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What makes fireworks colorful?

It’s all thanks to the luminescence of metals. When certain metals are heated (over a flame or in a hot explosion) their electrons jump up to a higher energy state. When those electrons fall back down, they emit specific frequencies of light - and each chemical has a unique emission spectrum.

You can see that the most prominent bands in the spectra above match the firework colors. The colors often burn brighter with the addition of an electron donor like Chlorine (Cl). 

But the metals alone wouldn’t look like much. They need to be excited. Black powder (mostly nitrates like KNO3) provides oxygen for the rapid reduction of charcoal © to create a lot hot expanding gas - the BOOM. That, in turn, provides the energy for luminescence - the AWWWW.

Aluminium has a special role — it emits a bright white light … and makes sparks!

Images: Charles D. Winters, Andrew Lambert Photography / Science Source, iStockphoto, Epic Fireworks, Softyx, Mark Schellhase, Walkerma, Firetwister, Rob Lavinsky, iRocks.com, Søren Wedel Nielsen

Why Should I Care For the Oceans?

We’ve all heard it:

“Why does it matter if we overfish tuna? It tastes so good!”

“If the oceans dried up tomorrow, why would I care? I live 500miles away from any body of water!”

The thing is, without the oceans, we would all be dead. Our planet would probably look like Mars. There would be no freshwater, no food for us to eat, no suitable climate for us to survive.

(Photo: Getty Images/iStockphoto)

Whether you live by the coast, or only see the ocean once a year on holiday, the ocean has an impact on your life. Every breath you take, every food or drinks you have… is thanks to our oceans. Every single individual and living being on this planet is deeply connected, and extremely dependent upon our seas.

The oceans regulates climate, weather, and temperature. They act as carbon dioxide ‘sinks’ from the atmosphere. They hold 97% of the Earth’s water. They govern our Earth’s chemistry; all the microbes and microscopic organisms at the very bottom of the food chain support our own existence. The oceans are also crucial for our economies, health and security.

(Photo credit: Brian Skerry)

The past generations have been raised with the idea that the ocean is huge (and it is) and resilient, and that we could basically take from or put into the oceans as much as we wanted. Now, we found out that we cant go on this way. This mentality is part of our problem and it needs to change.

While we have made tremendous discoveries about the oceans over the last few decades, we have also caused more destruction to the sea than ever before. Many fisheries stocks are overfished, catastrophic fishing techniques are destroying the habitats and depleting populations, many marine species are on the verge of extinction, coral reefs are dying, pollution run-offs from agricultural farms are creating dead-zones where nothing can grow or live, millions of gallons of oil have devastated the Gulf of Mexico, bigger and faster container ships create noise pollution for marine mammals and endangers them…The list goes on, and on. We have had so much impact that we have actually changed the pH of the oceans! 

Pretty overwhelming, uh? 

So yes, you should care, because if the oceans crash, we as a species are crashing with them. The entire planet Earth will be gone. And if that’s not enough of a wake-up call for you, I don’t know what else could be!

While all the current marine conservation issues appear huge and insurmountable, there is still hope. Each individual can make a difference now. YOU can make better choices about which fish to consume (or not at all!) and ask about the way they were caught or raised, YOU can encourage sustainable fishing practices, YOU can decide not to use fertilizer or pesticides in your backyard, YOU can bring your own reusable bag to the grocery store and stop using plastics, YOU can stop using products with microbeads, YOU can participate in beach clean-ups, YOU can start your own research and discover even more awesome things about the oceans… YOU can spread the word to your skeptic friends! Have people follow in your footsteps; inspire your friends and family. Be the change :) !

(Photo source: Flickr)

“If you want to have an impact on history and help secure a better future for all that you care about, be alive now” - Sylvia Earle

anonymous asked:

Do you have any advice for someone whose really tight on money? I have a part time job but it's not enough and I have bills. It's becoming a lot to handle.

Hey darling 💕 I sympathize with your current situation; you’re definitely not alone. Money stresses are unfortunately not uncommon, and heavily impacts both our mental and physical health. It’s important to concentrate on self care and positivity through this time.

  • Avoid negative thinking. I know I always say this but it’s crucial. When times are tough, it’s easy to get carried away with the negative voice inside our head. Instead of focusing on the bad or putting ourselves down, try to concentrate on the positive. For example; be extra proud of all the hard work you put into your job.
  • Set a budget, or go over it if you already have one. Having an organized spending plan will give you much more control. The three biggest money stressors are: spending more than you make, living paycheck to paycheck, and / or owing money. Face the issue head on and start building your plan.
  • Reach out to a trusted family member or close friend that you can vent to and share your honest feelings. Being able to talk openly about your troubles will help reduce stress, and they may be able to give you some helpful tips.
  • Know that seeking medical help is another good option. Having that support from a professional can help tremendously. I don’t mean to cause stress, but I think it’s important to be aware of the possibilities and the reality of being affected by stress. Anxiety disorders and depression are the most common mental illnesses caused by financial troubles. Insomnia, eating disorders, and many more serious physical illnesses are also common. It’s important to reach out when things become overwhelming.
  • Start an emergency fund. Keep a jar or an envelope in a safe place and start putting away small amounts when you can. Every penny counts, and having that extra bit saved allows you to be proud of yourself, have an extra option when money gets tight, or even when you want to reward yourself for all of your hard work.

Heres a few tips to save money where you are now:

  • Shop smart. Use any coupons you can for groceries and sign up for email newsletters because they usually contain sales and secret deals. Free reward programs are another amazing way to earn and save grocery money!
  • Save on your energy bill. Get used to turning off lights, unplugging appliances, turning off the tv when you’re not using it, etc. Being more conscious of your water usage is another good one.
  • Plan your meals ahead of time and try to cook at home when you can. Don’t be afraid to do some research for inexpensive but tasty meals.

There are also quite a few ways to make some extra crash but they will cost you time. These are just some ideas that might be useful.

  • Walk your friend’s or neighbour’s dog(s). This is a really fun, quick and underrated way to make money and spend time with a good buddy.
  • Use advertisements on your website with Google Adsense.
  • Consider opening up a free store online or selling to friends and the community. If you have any good quality outgrown, gently used or unused clothing that you rarely wear or don’t want; consider selling them. Old jewelry, furniture, books, and other things just taking up space are good to sell, too.
  • Use your artistic hobbies or take up a new hobby that can pay such as: photography, knitting, baking, cooking, drawing, painting, sewing, woodcraft, writing, digital artistry, calligraphy, jewelry making, papercraft, etc. Freelancing in makeup artistry, hairstyling, nail artistry are other great ways to make money. Even though they are highly competitive jobs, there is a large and constant demand.

Recommended Websites:

Etsy - Sell everything from clothing, accessories, interior design, etc.
Storenvy - Sell everything from clothing, accessories, interior design, etc.

TeePublic - Upload your artwork and sell it on clothing.
RedBubble - Upload your artwork and sell it on clothing and more.
Society6 - Upload your artwork and sell it on clothing and more.

PoshMark - Sell your clothes.
ThredUP - Sell your clothes.

SkyWord - Get paid to write.
SliceThePie - Get paid to review music.

ShutterStock - Sell your photography and stock photos.
iStockPhoto - Sell your photography and stock photos.

Amazon Trade-In - Sell your old or unused electronics.
BestBuy Trade-In - Sell your old or unused electronics.
Gazelle Trade-In - Sell your old or unused electronics.
ItsWorthMore - Sell your old or unused electronics.

StudyPool - Get paid to tutor online.
Chegg - Get paid to tutor online.

InstaGC - Get paid to answer surveys.
Ipsos ISay - Get paid to answer surveys.
OpinionOutpost - Get paid to answer surveys.
Toluna - Get paid to answer surveys.

Recommended Apps:

iPoll (IOS)
Qriket (IOS) enter 57F794 for 25 extra spins
AppNana (Android)
OpinionRewards (Android)
GrabPoints (Android)
PerkTV (Android)
SlideJoy (Android)
S’more (Android)
Swagbucks (Android)
QuickThoughts (Android)

I really hope at least one of these tips can help you out. Remember that your present situation is not your final destination. This will pass. You will get through this. Good luck and stay strong angel. 🌻💕

Stories about black women whose employers asked them to cut their dreadlocks or to trim their big afros have surfaced with more frequency in the last few years. Now a new study confirms that many people —including black ones— have a bias against the types and styles of natural hair worn by black people.

The “Good Hair Study” was conducted by Perception Institute, which describes itself as “a consortium of researchers, advocates and strategists” that uses emotional and psychological research to identify and reduce bias in areas such as law enforcement, education, civil justice and the workplace. The study resulted from a partnership with Shea Moisture, a black-owned hair and body products company, and aimed to better understand the connection between implicit bias and textured hair.

New Evidence Shows There’s Still Bias Against Black Natural Hair

Photo: portishead1/Getty Images/iStockphoto

Over the past two years, I’ve lived in six cities in two states — Arizona, New York — and the District of Columbia. And one of the first things I always notice about each new place is the street harassment.

Manhattan and Brooklyn were rough. During my first week of work in Manhattan, a tall man in a coat said “good morning, baby” to me as he masturbated. Calls of “hey baby” were almost as common as “good morning.” In Phoenix, I got harassed in my car during rush hour gridlock with honks, “heys” and sexually explicit gestures. And during my first month interning with NPR in Washington, D.C., I was honked at, leered at, “hey baby'ed” and, once, even followed to work.

I’m not alone. A 2014 survey commissioned by Stop Street Harassment, a nonprofit that works to document and end street harassment, showed that 65 percent of all women in the U.S. said they had experienced street harassment. In the 2,000-person nationally representative poll, 23 percent of U.S. women said they’d been touched and 20 percent had been followed. Among men, about a quarter surveyed said they had been harassed on the street.

Why Street Harassers Speak The Same Language Across The U.S.

Illustration: raccoon2517/Getty Images/iStockphoto

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Honeybees are in trouble. Here’s how you can help

The die-off of America’s honeybee colonies, which are disappearing in droves because of parasites, pesticides, poor nutrition and disease, leave beekeepers scrambling to salvage the vital insects.

The task of solving the honeybee problem, experts say, isn’t isolated to beekeepers. A few changes to home patios and gardens can lend honeybees a much-needed assist.

Last year, a third of the nation’s honeybee colonies died, which is low considering the bigger decreases of the last decade. This doesn’t necessarily mean fewer bees. Beekeepers can salvage a dead colony, but it comes with labor and production costs.

(Photo: Getty Images/iStockphoto)

Despite the toxic ingredients commonly found in e-cigarettes and other vaping products, many adults don’t think secondhand e-cigarette aerosol poses a risk to children, according to a report published Thursday by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

About one-third of adults surveyed didn’t know if secondhand aerosol caused harm to children, and 40 percent of the adults said this kind of exposure caused “little” or “some” harm to children.

The newness of these products, promotion by the industry and the lack of regulation contribute to the knowledge gap, says Dr. Brian King, one of the study’s authors and the deputy director for research translation at the CDC’s Office on Smoking and Health.

Many Adults Don’t Think Exposure To Vaping Is Bad For Kids

Photo: Mauro Grigollo/Getty Images/iStockphoto

California Supreme Court justice Goodwin said he realized he hadn’t seen a comprehensive study of how Asian-Americans came into the legal profession — so he took it upon himself to lead one.

In the study, Liu shows that though Asian-Americans are the fastest-growing minority group in the legal field, there’s still a stark lack of Asian-American lawyers in top positions in this country.

In 2015, 10 percent of graduates at the top-30 law schools were Asian-American, according to the study. Yet they only comprised about 6 percent of federal law clerks and 4 percent of state law clerks. Compare that to white students, and you’ll see a striking contrast: 58 percent of students from top-30 schools were white, but still landed 82 percent of all federal clerkships and 80 percent of all state clerkships.

What’s Keeping Asian-American Lawyers From Ascending The Legal Ranks?

Illustration: Tawatdchai Muelae/Getty Images/iStockphoto