Islamic-State-of-Iraq-and-Syria

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To stop terrorism against Americans, Donald Trump should ban Americans from America

  • The Trump administration is considering banning visas from Syria, Iraq, Iran, Libya, Somalia, Sudan and Yemen.
  • Terrorism in the U.S. is a primarily homegrown phenomenon. Trump’s order does nothing to counter this.
  • In 2015, the New York Times reviewed the backgrounds of 20 Islamic extremist attackers in the U.S. since the Sept. 11, 2001, and found that half of the assailants were born in the United States. 
  • An additional five attackers were fully naturalized citizens, while just three were in the U.S. with green cards and one held a tourist visa.
  • Since 2015, the trend hasn’t changed in high-profile attacks. Omar Mateen, Pulse nightclub shooter in Orlando, was born in New York. 
  • Ahmad Khan Rahami, the man who detonated bombs which wounded 29 in New York on Sept. 17, was born in Afghanistan in 1988 but was a naturalized citizen since 2011. 
  • Esteban Santiago Ruiz, the 26-year-old U.S. military veteran who killed five and wounded six others at Ft. Lauderdale Airport on Jan. 6, was a U.S. citizen.
  • Of the high profile terror attacks in 2016, only 18-year-old Abdul Razak Ali Artan, the Ohio State University student who wounded 11 people on Nov. 28, might have been impeded by Trump’s order,
  • But only by preventing him from entering the country while he was a child, long before he was radicalized. Artan was a Somali refugee.
  • What about 9/11? Of the 19 total 9/11 attackers, 15 were from Saudi Arabia, two came from the United Arab Emirates, and one each from Egypt and Lebanon. None of which are included in Trump’s list.
  • In June 2015, the Triangle Center on Terrorism and Homeland Security reported, based on surveys of 382 law enforcement organizations, that:
  • “Law enforcement agencies in the United States consider anti-government violent extremists, not radicalized Muslims, to be the most severe threat of political violence that they face.”
  • Since most U.S. terror attacks are committed by homegrown extremists, not foreigners, and perceived persecution is a commonly cited motivation among terror suspects… 
  • Trump’s order could do little to prevent attacks but perpetuate the narrative of civilization-scale conflict that groups like the Islamic State, also know as ISIS, rely upon to radicalize new converts. Read more

ISIS affiliate Boko Haram has been totally crushed, Nigerian government says

Nigerian President Muhammadu Buhari said on Saturday that his country’s armed forces had crushed the last remaining stronghold of notorious terror group Boko Haram, driving the militants out of their “Camp Zero” in northern Sambisa Forest, USA Today reported. Boko Haram, which pledged allegiance to the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria and stepped up coordination with the latter organization earlier this year, was founded in 2002 and launched a violent uprising in 2009. According to humanitarian organization Doctors Without Borders, as of late 2015, the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees estimated the group’s rebellion had displaced nearly 1.4 million people. Read more.

IRAQ. Basra governorate. Near Umm Qasr. March 16, 2009. Detainees walk after prayer at Camp Bucca, a U.S. military detention centre. At its peak, the prison located 340 miles southeast of Baghdad held 26,000 detainees.

Camp Bucca has been described as playing an important role in shaping ISIS. The detention of large numbers of Jihadists and ex-Ba’athists during the Iraqi insurgency provided them with the opportunity to forge alliances and learn from each other, combining the ideological fervour of the former with the organisational skills of the latter. Former Camp Bucca detainees who went on to become leaders in the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant include Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi, the leader of Daesh; Abu Muslim al-Turkmani, al-Baghdadi’s deputy; Haji Bakr, who spearheaded ISIL’s expansion into Syria; Abu Abdulrahman al-Bilawi, the military leader responsible for planning the seizure of Mosul; and Abu Ayman al-Iraqi, another senior military leader. Abu Mohammad al-Julani, who founded the Syrian Al Qaeda affiliate al-Nusra Front, was also a Camp Bucca detainee.

Photograph: Yuri Kozyrev/Noor

independent.co.uk
"I am a 14-year-old Yazidi girl given as a gift to an Isis commander. Here’s how I escaped"

“That afternoon, they brought us to an empty school in Baaj, a little town west of Mosul near the Syrian border. We met many other Yazidi women who were captured by Islamic State. Their fathers, brothers and husbands had also been killed, they told us. Then Islamic State fighters entered. One of them recited the words to the shahada, the Muslim creed – “I testify that there is no God but Allah, and that Muhammad is his prophet” – and said that if we repeated them, we would become Muslims. But we refused. They were furious. They insulted us a lot and cursed us and our beliefs.”

I’ve been reading a lot on ISIS and this article in particular really affected me. It’s the story of Narin, a fourteen-year-old Yazidi girl who was taken captive by ISIS. It’s her story of captivity up until she was able to miraculously escape. It’s a good read so I highly suggest you read it, especially if you don’t know much about what’s happening with ISIS.

One tragedy doesn’t need to diminish another. You can stand with Paris, you can stand with Yemen, you can stand with Lebanon, you can stand with Syria, you can stand with Iraq, you can stand with Nigeria, you can stand with Libya, you can stand with BlackLivesMatter, you can stand with the University of Missouri, you can stand with Palestine, you can stand with South Korea, and the South Sudan, we can stand with refugees, we can stand with Muslims, and you can stand with all of them at the same time. You can care about all of them. We don’t need to play “oh you didn’t mention this, or this was worse” competitions with human suffering. It’s sickening, this is not a fucking game, this is the actual loss of human life.

telegraph.co.uk
Everything you need to know about Donald Trump's 'Muslim ban'
What is an executive order?

by James Rothwell

What is an executive order?

An executive order is an official statement from the president which tells government agencies how to use their resources.  In the case of Mr Trump’s “Muslim ban”, the order bars citizens of seven Muslim-majority countries from entering the US for a period of 90 days.

It also suspends the United States’ refugee system for a period of 120 days.  Mr Trump says his “extreme vetting” system will help “keep radical Islamic terrorists out of the US”.

Who does it affect?

The order itself does not name the countries whose citizens are banned from entering the US. Instead, it refers to a statute which applies to seven Muslim-majority nations. They are Syria, Iran, Sudan, Libya, Somalia, Yemen and Iraq, with dual nationals included in the ban.
Certain visa categories, such as those for diplomats, are exempt. There have also been reports of legal US residents, known as green card holders, being turned away from US-bound flights.

Green cards are not mentioned explicitly in the executive order. Oddly, the ban does not apply to the nationalities of those who carried out the 9/11 attacks, such as Saudi Arabia, the United Arab Emirates and Egypt.

How does it affect refugees?

The ban completely suspends the United States’ Syrian refugee programme, which accepted 12,486 Syrians in 2016.  It also gives preference to accepting Christian refugees from the Middle East over Muslim refugees.  And it reduces the cap on the total number of refugees allowed to enter the US in 2017 from 110,000 to just 50,000.

Is the executive order legally binding?  

Executive orders are legally binding and are recorded in the Federal Register,  a daily record of all federal regulations, proposals, and public notices. But they can be subjected to a legal review - and, according to the New York Times, the “Muslim ban” order is illegal.

According to the newspaper, the Immigration and Nationality Act of 1965 banned all discrimination against immigrants on the basis of national origin.

Mr Trump’s travel ban, it says, appears to be violation of that act.  

What happens next?

Opponents of the “extreme vetting” order say they will launch a legal challenge on two fronts. They are expected to argue that the blanket ban violates the fifth amendment right to due process.

They will also argue that the order’s preferential treatment of Christians over Muslims violates the first amendment on freedom of religion.

LIBYA. Sirte. September 2016. We Are Not Taking Any Prisoners. Fighters of Libyan forces affiliated with the Tripoli government walk around a gigantic chandelier of the conference room in Ouagadougou Congress Complex. Sirte, Libya, is one of the three self-proclaimed capitals of the so-called Islamic State, along with Raqqa in Syria and Mosul in Iraq. It was the first of the three to fall, with an offensive launched by the Libyan government in May 2016. It took seven months of fighting, 500 American airstrikes, the lives of 700 Libyan soldiers and more than 3,000 injured Libyan soldiers to finally declare the city free.

General News, Third Prize, Stories at the World Press Photo Contest.

Photograph: Alessio Romenzi

150,000 Afghan men, women and children killed or missing.
1,500,000 Iraqi men women and children killed or missing.
The Syrian Civil War.
The rise of ISIL.
The life and death struggle of the Kurdish and Yazidi peoples.
Literally countless refugee deaths at sea in the Mediterranean.
Terror attacks in the UK and other European nations.

All of these flow directly from the cold, premeditated, self-serving actions of the twenty-first century Men of Blood: Anthony Charles Lynton Blair, the slavering cross-bench pack of war dogs whom he led, and the bloodied capitalist interests who profited from taking us to two undemocratic, illegal imperialist wars in the Middle East. No Hell will ever come close to their atonement for initiating one of the most monstrous regional bloodbaths in human history.

6

Mosul offensive: ISIS militants fleeing to Syria, says tribal leader

over 100,000 allied forces converge on a region controlled by only 5000 islamic state fighters

————

Near Mosul, Iraq (CNN)Hundreds of ISIS fighters are fleeing Mosul in Iraq and crossing into neighboring Syria as coalition forces close in on the city, a powerful tribal leader in the region says.

Sheikh Abdullah Alyawer, a tribal leader in the town of Rabia, on Iraq’s border with Syria, told CNN Monday that dozens of ISIS militants and their families were fleeing the city each day, and crossing into Syria at Ba'aaj, an ISIS-controlled crossing point south of Sinjar.

The route was entirely along corridors under ISIS control, he said. Fleeing civilians with no affiliation to ISIS usually ended up in the Syrian town of al Houl, which is under Kurdish control, he said.


Better than expected gains

Coalition forces celebrated better-than-expected territorial gains over the weekend and artillery fire pummeled ISIS positions in the encircled town of Bashiqa early Monday morning in the relentless push for Mosul.

According to the Iraqi Joint Operations command center, 78 towns and villages have been liberated so far as the operation to retake the city enters its second week.

The center said 772 ISIS fighters had been killed and 23 were detained, 127 vehicle-borne explosive devices were destroyed, two bomb-making factories were discovered and nearly 400 improvised-explosive devices were remotely detonated so far.

United against ISIS

The offensive is remarkable for both its speed and the level of cooperation that this disparate group is showing in the face of its common enemy – an extraordinary union of factions that have long stood on opposing sides in Iraq’s history, with Kurdish forces, Christians and Shia Muslims fighting alongside the majority Sunni Arabs.

The thousands of ground troops were supported from above with a concentrated program of airstrikes aimed at weakening ISIS’ defenses – the highest weekly number since the campaign against the terror group began, according to Brett McGurk, Special Presidential Envoy for the Global Coalition to Counter ISIL.

“One week into #Mosul operation, all objectives met thus far, and more coalition airstrikes than any other 7-day period of war against #ISIL,” he wrote on Twitter, using another name for ISIS.

The coalition force, which vastly exceeds ISIS’ numbers, is closing in on the beleaguered city, still home to an estimated 200,000 to 300,000 civilians.
But the coalition is well aware that resistance – already tough in the open fields and small villages surrounding the main prize – is likely to ramp up significantly when the city’s perimeter is breached.

ISIS has been in control of Mosul for two years, giving its fighters plenty of time to fortify defenses, and the militants have time and time again proved themselves adept at bloody, urban warfare.

The city was important to the terror group as the cultural capital of its envisaged caliphate, or Islamic state.

‘Freed’ and then forgotten

With this weekend’s gains have come pockets of horrific losses.

ISIS executed about 40 people who were celebrating the apparent liberation of their villages by Iraqi forces, a Mosul City Council official said Sunday, citing local sources.

The official said that although Iraqi troops passed through the village where the executions took place – near Nimrud, south of Mosul – they did not leave units behind to ensure that ISIS militants stayed out.

These follow executions on Thursday and Friday, when ISIS militants rounded up and shot dead 284 men and boys, an Iraqi intelligence source told CNN.

Emergency crews have been working around the clock to extinguish a fire at a sulfur factory in Qayyara, about 30 kilometers south of Mosul, that was torched by ISIS militants.

The fire, started when the ISIS militants left explosives and slow-burning oil in sulfur deposits and around the facility, has sent plumes of toxic smoke in the air, causing hundreds to seek medical help.

SYRIA. Rojava. Al-Hasakah governorate. Near Derik/Al-Malikilyah. Newroz Refugee Camp. March 2015. A young Yazidi refugee sporting a YPG necklace.

Account of Joey L., war photographer:

After bearing witness to the scenes in Shingal (Sinjar), I thought it was important to include portraits of Yezidi Kurds whom had been displaced by the Islamic State. We headed far north of Shingal, across the former Syrian border into Rojava to Newroz, a guerrilla-protected refugee camp. Many of the Yezidi people at the camp were saved by a narrow, treacherous, zigzagging corridor created by guerrilla forces, who beat back the Islamic State on both sides, using the rugged terrain to their advantage.

It was in Newroz where I met a young Yezidi boy of about 11 or 12 years old who shared a poem he wrote. It wasn’t until I got home that I had a friend translate his spoken word. As I read the words one night from the comfort of my home, I couldn’t help but choke up over the stark reality this boy had witnessed, and the strength of spirit that he had to share:

“Rise up, rise up and open your eyes from your slumber…

It is true that we are all injured, half dead and half burning…

Who but this mountain, YPG and God have freed us?

Mountain of Shingal, my mother, blood is dripping from your plums…

We have not yet escaped our last massacre, today we are victims of a white massacre…

Again we are fighting like wolves…

Go to Shingal’s mountain, go to the roofs, shout to God “Rise up, Rise up”

Islamic State in Iraq and Greater Syria (ISIS) is not Islamic. “No religion condones the killing of innocents, and the vast majority of ISIL’s victims have been Muslim,” Obama said. “ISIL is a terrorist organization, pure and simple. And it has no vision other than the slaughter of all who stand in its way.”

Over a hundred Muslim scholars and clergymen from all over the world have released in September an address to Islamic State (IS, formerly ISIS) leader Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi, accusing the self-proclaimed caliph and his army of heinous war crimes and violation of fundamental principles of Islam, illiterate use of Islamic scripture torn from the context and perversion of the rules of morality and Sharia law.

A British Islamic State fighter who carried out a suicide bombing in Iraq this week is a former Guantanamo Bay detainee who was paid £1 million compensation by the government.

Jamal al-Harith, a Muslim convert born Ronald Fiddler who detonated a car bomb at an Iraqi army base near Mosul, was released from the US detention camp in 2004 and successfully claimed compensation after saying British agents knew or were complicit in his mistreatment.

He was freed following intense lobbying by Tony Blair’s Labour government.

Al-Harith, who used the nom de guerre Abu-Zakariya al-Britani, entered Syria via Turkey in 2014 to join Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant, leading to questions at the time about the monitoring of terrorist suspects.

It also raised the possibility that compensation money paid by British taxpayers had been handed on by him to Isil.

Earlier this week Isil released an image of him sitting inside the bomb car grinning broadly, with wires and what may be a detonation button in the background.

A statement released by the terrorist group said: “The martyrdom-seeking brother Abu Zakariya al-Britani - may Allah accept him - detonated his explosives-laden vehicle on a headquarters of the Rafidhi army and its militias in Tal Kisum village, southwest of Mosul.”

“Rafidha” is a derogatory term for Shiite Muslims, who Isil considers to be heretics.

His brother, Leon Jameson, told The Times Al-Harith had “wasted his life”.

He added: “I didn’t think he’d ever do anything wrong but, if he’s joining extremists, then, you know … I’m not ashamed of him, I never will be. But it’s his own decision. I can only just give him advice if he needs any.”

The 53-year-old said his brother had been a keen sportsman in his youth, playing football, basketball and table-tennis and winning a trophy for karate when he was a teenager.

He later converted to Islam after meeting Muslim friends at a sixth form college.

“All I know is one day he brought a Quran home,” Mr Jameson told the newspaper.

“We were supportive of it, yeah,we didn’t see anything wrong with it at the time and the trouble only started later, seems like he’s been dragged into it.”

The 50-year-old, originally from Manchester, was arrested by US forces in Pakistan in 2001 as a suspected Taliban sympathiser, before being sent to Guantanamo Bay in Cuba in 2002.

At the time of his release, the then home secretary David Blunkett said: “No-one who is returned…will actually be a threat to the security of the British people.”

Earlier this week Isil named him as the man who had blown himself up in the car bombing at the Iraqi army base, and released a picture of him.

Al-Harith’s wife Shukee Begum travelled to Syria with their five children to try to persuade her husband to return to the UK, but failed and was taken hostage before eventually managing to escape.

Al-Harith, the son of Jamaican immigrants, converted to Islam in the 1990s and worked as a web designer before he travelled to the Pakistani city of Quetta in 2001 for what he claimed was a religious holiday.

He has insisted he tried to enter Iran when the US invaded neighbouring Afghanistan, but was captured and imprisoned by the Taliban on suspicion of being a UK spy.

When US special forces found him in a Taliban jail, they assessed him as a “high threat to the US” who was “probably involved in a former terrorist attack against the US”.

Al-Harith’s prisoner file from Guantanamo Bay, published online by WikiLeaks, refers to him travelling to Sudan in 1992 with “Abu Bakr, a well-known al-Qaeda operative”.

After his return to the UK - where he was released without charge - he joined three other former prisoners known as the Tipton Three in a failed attempt to sue Donald Rumsfeld, the then US Defense Secretary.

His legal action against the British government was more successful, resulting in a payment of up to £1 million in return for which he agreed not to talk about his ordeal.

Cage, the controversial human rights group, still features a profile of al-Harith on a part of its old website, Cageprisoners. It reads:

Born Ronald Fiddler on November 20, 1966, to devout, churchgoing Jamaican parents, al Harith converted to Islam in his 20s after reading Malcom X’s biography. He has two sisters, Maxine and Sharon.

His family say he is a gentle, quiet man who rarely spoke of his faith unless asked, and after four years learning Arabic and teaching English at Khartoum University in Sudan, he seemed happy enough to return home where he started to study nursing. At this time, he also established a computer business. He later moved back to Manchester, where he worked as an administrator in a Muslim school.

He travelled from the UK to Pakistan at the end of September 2001, retracing a journey he had made to Iran in 1993. He paid a lorry driver to take him from northern Pakistan to Iran as part of a backpacking trip, but they were stopped near the Afghan border by Taliban soldiers who saw his British passport and jailed him, in October, fearing he was a spy. He had been away from home only three weeks when he was captured.

As the operation to mop up al Qaida forces went on into the spring of 2001, he was captured by US forces while being held in Kandahar Jail. He was interrogated by the CIA in Afghanistan before being taken to Guantanamo.

He was released from Guantanamo and returned to the UK on 9th March 2004. After a few hours of questioning he was released without charge and reunited with his family. Jamal was the first of the British detainees to speak publicly about his ordeal. He married in late 2004 and has three children (aged 3,5, and 8) from a previous marriage.

Tim Loughton, a Conservative MP reportedly said: “This is a scandalous situation. So much for Tony Blair’s assurances that this extremist did not pose a security threat.

"He clearly was a risk to Britain and our security all along. It adds insult to injury that he was given £1million in compensation because of Blair’s flawed judgement that he was an innocent.”

John Pugh, a Lib Dem MP, said: “This raises serious questions about the reassurances Labour gave us that this man posed no danger.

"It is a kick in the teeth that he was given a fortune in taxpayers’ money after claiming he was innocent only to flee to Islamic State and pose a risk to the UK.

"The Home Office needs to explain how he was able to leave the country so easily despite his background mixing with those at the very top of Islamic terrorism.”

As many as 850 people regarded as a national security concern have travelled to fight with jihadis in the Middle East.

Just under half are thought to have returned to Britain while 15 per cent are believed to have been killed.

The Foreign Office states:

The UK has advised for some time against all travel to Syria, and against all travel to large parts of Iraq.

As all UK consular services are suspended in Syria and greatly limited in Iraq, it is extremely difficult to confirm the whereabouts and status of British nationals in these areas.

1. Mohammed Emwazi / Jihadi John

Emwazi was reported killed in a November 2015 air strike, with US forces saying they were “reasonably certain” he was dead.

Isil later released what appeared to be an obituary to the fighter, who it called Abu Muharib al-Muhajir.

It featured a smiling picture of the militant, who appeared unmasked looking towards the ground.

Emwazi shocked the world when he appeared in a video in August 2014 in which he condemned the West and appeared to behead US journalist James Foley.

He emerged again in a number of other videos released by Isil, including those in which American reporter Steven Sotloff and British aid workers David Haines and Alan Henning were murdered.

Kuwait-born Emwazi attended Quintin Kynaston Community Academy in north London and was described by his former head teacher as a “hard-working aspirational young man”.

He went on to gain a degree in information systems with business management from the University of Westminster.

2. Reyaad Khan

Khan was 20 when he appeared in an Isil propaganda video titled, There Is No Life Without Jihad, in June last year together with two other Britons urging Westerners to join the war.

The man, from Cardiff, is thought to have travelled to fight in Syria late in 2013.

His Facebook page revealed that he was a Chelsea FC fan who enjoyed playing computer games FIFA 12 and Call Of Duty.

After appearing in the video with a Kalashnikov assault rifle against his shoulder his mother said she believed he had been “brainwashed” into joining Isil.

In a direct appeal to her son, the woman, who asked to remain unnamed, sobbed as she said: “Reyaad, please come back home. I’m dying for you. You’re my only son.”

Before leaving for Syria, Khan attended Cardiff’s Al-Manar Centre (ACT) together with Nasser Muthana, who was also filmed for the Isil recruitment video.

The mosque denied the pair had been taught extremist views there and blamed the internet as an “alarming source for radicalisation”.

David Cameron, the then Prime Minister, said Khan had been killed on August 21 2015 when he was targeted by an RAF remotely piloted aircraft while travelling in a vehicle in Raqqah, Syria.

3. Ruhul Amin

Amin, 26, featured alongside Khan and Muthana in the 13-minute Isil recruitment video under the name Brother Abu Bara al Hindi.

Wearing sunglasses and a white headscarf, he could be heard saying: “Are you willing to sacrifice the fat job you’ve got, the big car, the family you have?

"Are you willing to sacrifice this, for the sake of Allah? If you do Allah will give you back 700 times more.”

Also known as Abdul Raqib Amin, he was born in Bangladesh and grew up in Aberdeen before reportedly moving with his family to Leicester.
In July 2014 he boasted on ITV’s Good Morning Britain that he had been “involved in a few combats” in Syria.

Explaining the moment he left Britain, he said: “I left the house with the intention of not to go back. I’m going to stay and fight until the (caliphate) is established, or I die.”

A leading member of Aberdeen’s Muslim community, who did not want to be identified, said he was not someone who “stood out in any particular way”.

He was killed in the same airstrike as Khan.

4. Junaid Hussain


Computer hacker Hussain was described as a key Isil operative before he was killed by a US drone strike on August 24 2016.

The 21-year-old, from Birmingham, was said to have been number three on the Pentagon’s “kill list” of Isil targets.

It is believed that he fled Britain to travel to Syria in 2013, and in June last year he was linked to a plot to attack an Armed Forces Day parade in south London.

The plan to explode a pressure cooker bomb - killing soldiers and bystanders on the route - was reportedly foiled after Hussain unwittingly recruited an undercover investigator from The Sun to carry it out.In June 2012, aged 18, Hussain was jailed for six months after he admitted making prank calls to a counter-terror hotline and publishing former prime minister Tony Blair’s address book.He was a member of TeaMpOisoN (TeamPoison), a group which claimed responsibility for more than 1,400 offences where personal and private information has been illegally extracted from victims in the UK and around the world.Hussain was reportedly married to a Muslim convert named as Sally Jones, a mother-of-two from Kent who once was a member of an all-girl punk rock group.