Ira Glass

Nobody tells this to people who are beginners, I wish someone told me. All of us who do creative work, we get into it because we have good taste. But there is this gap. For the first couple years you make stuff, it’s just not that good. It’s trying to be good, it has potential, but it’s not. But your taste, the thing that got you into the game, is still killer. And your taste is why your work disappoints you. A lot of people never get past this phase, they quit. Most people I know who do interesting, creative work went through years of this. We know our work doesn’t have this special thing that we want it to have. We all go through this. And if you are just starting out or you are still in this phase, you gotta know its normal and the most important thing you can do is do a lot of work. Put yourself on a deadline so that every week you will finish one story. It is only by going through a volume of work that you will close that gap, and your work will be as good as your ambitions. And I took longer to figure out how to do this than anyone I’ve ever met. It’s gonna take awhile. It’s normal to take a while. You’ve just gotta fight your way through.
—  Ira Glass’ (from This American Life)
I’d just say to aspiring journalists or writers—who I meet a lot of—do it now. Don’t wait for permission to make something that’s interesting or amusing to you. Just do it now. Don’t wait. Find a story idea, start making it, give yourself a deadline, show it to people who’ll give you notes to make it better. Don’t wait till you’re older, or in some better job than you have now. Don’t wait for anything. Don’t wait till some magical story idea drops into your lap. That’s not where ideas come from. Go looking for an idea and it’ll show up. Begin now. Be a fucking soldier about it and be tough.
—  Ira Glass, LifeHacker Interview
Nobody tells this to people who are beginners, I wish someone told me. All of us who do creative work, we get into it because we have good taste. But there is this gap. For the first couple years you make stuff, it’s just not that good. It’s trying to be good, it has potential, but it’s not. And your taste is why your work disappoints you. A lot of people never get past this phase, they quit. Most people I know who do interesting, creative work went through years of this. We know our work doesn’t have this special thing that we want it to have. We all go through this. And if you are just starting out or you are still in this phase, you gotta know its normal and the most important thing you can do is do a lot of work. Put yourself on a deadline so that every week you will finish one story. It is only by going through a volume of work that you will close that gap, and your work will be as good as your ambitions. And I took longer to figure out how to do this than anyone I’ve ever met. It’s gonna take awhile. It’s normal to take awhile. You’ve just gotta fight your way through.
—  Ira Glass

The 8 Best ‘This American Life’ Episodes Of All Time

1. “The Long-Haired Boys”In this classic 2008 episode, producer Robyn Semien travels across the U.S. interviewing men who had long hair when they were boys. Listeners find out if the men still have long hair as men, and whether they would consider letting their son have long hair.

2. “Boat Man”—Most boat owners avoid the pier, but not Gerald Toblowski, who enjoys smashing his boat into it as fast as possible. The story of how one family struggles to make ends meet, facing ever-mounting debt as they continually repair their boat and dock.

3. “Square One”—Stories about starting over. Nancy Updike talks about buying an identical replacement dog, David Sedaris recalls his experiences repeating first grade a dozen times, and in the third act, Jake Halpern blasts into space to see if, when you travel far enough, the universe wraps around on itself. His conclusion? It does.

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Don’t wait for permission to make something that’s interesting or amusing to you. Just do it now. Don’t wait. Find a story idea, start making it, give yourself a deadline, show it to people who’ll give you notes to make it better. Don’t wait till you’re older, or in some better job than you have now. Don’t wait for anything. Don’t wait till some magical story idea drops into your lap. That’s not where ideas come from. Go looking for an idea and it’ll show up. Begin now. Be a fucking soldier about it and be tough.
— 

Ira Glass to Lifehacker. I’m Ira Glass, Host of This American Life, and This Is How I Work.

Quick tip for things to do immediately post-interview:

When I come out of an interview, I jot down the things I remember as being my favorite moments. For an hour-long interview usually it’s just four or five moments, but if out I’m reporting all day, I’ll spend over an hour at night typing out every favorite thing that happened. This is handier than you might think. Often this short list of favorite things will provide the backbone to the structure to my story.

Read through for the gear This American Life uses and its editing process.

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The opening number from Lin Manuel Miranda’s “21 Chump Street: The Musical”, a 15 minute play he wrote in a week in 2014 after This American Life’s Ira Glass asked him to turn one of their radio stories into a mini-musical. Based on a true story, 21 Chump Street is narrated by Miranda and stars Anthony Ramos (aka John Laurens/Phillip Hamiton) as a high school student who falls in love with the new girl at school—who is actually an undercover cop.

Warning: “What the Heck I Gotta Do” is quite possibly the catchiest thing you’ll hear all week. IT WILL GET STUCK IN YOUR HEAD, THERE IS NO RESISTING IT.

I’d just say to aspiring journalists or writers—who I meet a lot of—do it now. Don’t wait for permission to make something that’s interesting or amusing to you. Just do it now. Don’t wait. Find a story idea, start making it, give yourself a deadline, show it to people who’ll give you notes to make it better. Don’t wait till you’re older, or in some better job than you have now. Don’t wait for anything. Don’t wait till some magical story idea drops into your lap. That’s not where ideas come from. Go looking for an idea and it’ll show up. Begin now. Be a fucking soldier about it and be tough.
—  Important advice from Ira Glass.
vimeo

I’ve posted this before but I can never post it enough.

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SIDESHOW: Sometimes there are other ideas that I think would be awesome. So think of these as guest blog entries from other sections of my brain. (See all Sideshows here.)

This is from a Tumblr that doesn’t exist called Ira Glass Ceiling. All captions are quotes from reports to the SEC, The World Bank, and The Federal Glass Ceiling Commission. All photos are of NPR radio personality Ira Glass.

Ira Glass … has said that “the power of anecdote is so great that it has a momentum in and of itself.” He contends, “no matter how boring the facts are,” with a well-told story, “you feel inherently as if you are on a train that has a destination.”
vimeo

Several years back, This American Life’s Ira Glass gave an incredible interview with Current.tv that instantly went viral. 

Daniel Sax created this fantastic rendition of Ira Glass’s inspirational words that’s sure to get your creative juices pumping. 

In a Creative Slump? Watch This

via Visual News