International-Service

I’m closing out Women’s History month with a post about someone I actually knew, my grandmother’s best friend, Jean Moore Fasse.

Mrs. Fasse was born in Lillington, North Carolina, in 1908 and was raised on a Harnett County farm. She worked as a nanny while attending high school and enrolled at Fayetteville State Teachers College (now Fayetteville State University). That’s where she and my grandmother met. They both earned teaching degrees. My grandmother accepted a position at a one-room school in rural Harnett County. Mrs. Fasse’s first teaching job was in a one-room school in Goldsboro, NC. My grandmother spent her career in education, but her friend decided teaching was not her calling.

In 1944, Mrs. Fasse joined the American Red Cross and was sent to Washington, D.C., for training. After training, she was stationed along the Ledo Road, a supply lifeline from India to China, built by the U.S. Army in World War II. She spent time in Calcutta, India and Burma. After the war, Mrs. Fasse returned to the States, but traveling was in her blood by then.

She signed up for the U.S. Special Services and was trained to run recreation clubs in Europe. She spent many years working in Germany, until she married in 1963. She remained in Europe until 1990.

Mrs. Fasse’s visits were always exciting. She was vivacious, quick-witted and sophisticated. And she always had lots of stories to tell. As a child who was curious by nature, she made me want to see the world myself.

The last time I saw Mrs. Fasse was after my grandmother’s funeral in 2002. She spent some time with our family, talking about the friendship she shared with my grandmother. They had a lot in common. They were both adventurous, independent, strong-willed women who thrived on breaking barriers.

Jean Fasse died on June 21, 2008.

Source: Jean Moore Fasse Papers, Jackson Library, The University of North Carolina at Greensboro

Photo: Jean Fasse in Indian dress, circa 1946

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brigadier

I apologize in advance for the scatter-brained post that follows. It’s been quite a week.

Timmy Global Health, who I’m working for (hopefully you’ve gathered that by now) sent down their first brigade since I’ve lived here in Xela.  Unique from the others, this group of 12 was a ‘public’ brigade - aka a group of random people (non-college students) that wanted to come down for a week and do some international medical service.  I have a lot of opinions about these sorts of trips in general, as they are often unsustainable and provide very limited relief, BUT I do find Timmy’s model to be better than most. We spent the week in 4 different rural mayan communities, all of which spoke a language other than spanish (Kich'e, Kaqchikel, and Mam).  In reality, over 20 Mayan languages are spoken all over Guatemala, an incredible maintenance of diversity considering the global obliteration of native languages.  

I recommend people check out the Timmy website for a greater description of what our medical brigades do - I don’t have the energy or desire to lay it all out here… sorry!  I spent most of my week translating prescriptions from our pharmacy to patients - in total about 400 very low income Guatemalans.  Exhausting, needless to say, but amazing.  We had 2 doctors, 2 nurses, a microbiologist, a medical student and his lovely mother, a professional spanish interpreter, and 2 young women with a desire to serve but no… necessarily applicable skills.  Luckily, we brought students from Pop Wuj to help translate, as well as our Guatemalan Clinic doctors, Alfonso and Jose.  We set up in schools, homes, and public halls in each village, setting up 'triage’, doctor rooms, and pharmacy where we could (often in less than ideal, but workable conditions).  I didn’t take many pictures, as I worried about the inappropriateness of snapping shots of Mayan women and children, but I have a few.  Next time, hopefully more. 

Our last day, in Antigua, was less than pleasant - I’ve picked up some sort of bug, which has combined itself with my 'gripe’, aka real bad cold, and I’m now digestively and respiratorially challenged.  Plus fever, aches… first time I’ve really wanted to go home since I got here, only so my Mommy could take care of me.  Luckily this week we’ve got a number of holidays with no work allowed (dia de los muertos and dia de santos) so I’m going to rest up real good and get back on my feet soon.

Moving into my new place shortly (god willing, waiting on the phone call still), so I can finally start settling in to a normal and self-controlled life down here. Obviously I’m very excited to start that up, particularly the part where I can cook for myself (NO MORE MEAT, MUCH MORE VEGETABLES) and am planning a scary movie marathon this evening with my lovely friend Katie.  

Hope you all are well up north - still encouraging visits (I’m renting an island for christmas….) 

once again, mucho mucho love

Hey guys! I’m working with daring-adventures and ravingpotato to plan and organize an 8 week service trip to Bali, Indonesia this summer. We are volunteering at Slukat Learning Center to teach English and Computer skills to help the youth of Bali fully integrate into the Balinese economy. We promised Slukat we will raise $4,000 to donate when we get there, but right now we only have a little over $900. Right now our national office is going to match a certain percentage of any money we raise for the next week, so please, if you could contribute anything it would mean the world us. 

Donate here: http://www.razoo.com/story/Uidaho-2014 

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I AM GOING TO GHANA

Followers, my friend needs your help!

My dear friend Rumbie is going to Burkina Faso this summer with the International Service and needs all the donations she can get!

All money raised will go towards the promotion of women’s rights and the disabled so please, please, please donate as much as you can (even if it’s just a £1).

Also this cray cray girl is doing a bungee jump at the Victoria Falls and the whole thing is going to be filmed!

Click here to DONATE and see her story! 

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renaissance woman, bonnie

Dancing in front of thousands of people in Beijing, China was my moment.

Being an Ally for my friends at the Georgia Pride Parade in 2013, that was my moment

Being apart of the REVOLUTIONARY MARCH FOR MICHAEL BROWN IN ATL,GEORGIA on AUGUST 20TH 2014, WAS MY MOMENT. 

BEING THE ONLY DARK SKINNED WOMAN IN MY PROM GROUP, WAS MY MOMENT. 

CUTTING ALL MY HAIR OFF IN 2012, WHEN I FIRST BEGUN MY SPIRITUAL JOURNEY, WAS MY MOMENT

& BEING A PART OF A GREAT BODY OF WOMEN AND MEN ACROSS THE GLOBE WHO KNOW HOW TO GIVE MORE THAN THEY RECEIVE, THAT IS WHY I AM STILL ALIVE. 

I have changed over the course of the last 3 years, but I will always have a serving spirit. I will always want to give more than I receive. I will always be the Black Girl who made it out the Hood. I will always be A Black Woman in America. 

I want everyone to know: I am more than my failures, I am more than my hurt. I am more than my skin tone, I am more than my kinky, short, long, or bald head. I am more than a crooked smile, or a dance move. I am more than a writer. I am more than a person merely existing… I am Light. I am a Gift to the World. Sometimes I wonder how I am going to make it, how I am going to be more than I feel…. I’ve learned to pray more than I worry because God has given me countless moments in my life to Shine; and so I shall… Namaste’

Why I Am Becoming A Rotarian

Why I Am Becoming A Rotarian

I first came across Rotary at a BBQ in front of my local hardware store. It’s just another charity, as far as I was concerned. The guy behind an apron looked like Santa, and I was happy to have sausages and a cold drink as a cheap lunch. After a few cheap lunches, I started to take notice of their unusual name. What is “Rotary”?

I didn’t really act on my curiosity until recently. My life took a…

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Ten Innovative NGOs in Education

FORUM for AFRICAN WOMEN EDUCATIONALISTS (FAWE)

Founded: 1992
Primary Work: Education advocacy
Located: 34 African countries
Website: http://www.fawe.org
Interesting fact: The Tuseme (“Let Us Speak Out”) initiative uses drama, song and creative arts to train girls to identify and understand the problems that affect them, articulate these problems and take action to solve them.

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