International-Dark-Sky-Association

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Hey everyone. First - I’m not dead. I’ve just been living for this project and I apologize for neglecting this blog. I will still continue posting space age stuff, but producing this animation besides working a full time job just needed all my time and attention. I hope you’re still there? ( :

Anyway, here’s the link to the film I made: https://vimeo.com/194509929

It’s about saving our night sky. I made it for the International Dark Sky Association to help fight light pollution. Hope you enjoy.

Over the past five years, Big Bend [National Park in Texas] has eliminated or retrofitted the outdoor lights on the park’s 289 buildings, as well as in its parking lots and campgrounds. In 2012, it received gold-tier certification from the International Dark-Sky Association, based on five measures of nighttime darkness and clarity. Only 13 parks in the world have that designation. Big Bend shares with three other places the claim to having the least light-polluted sky in the Lower 48 states.

(via Deep in the heart of Big Bend National Park - The Washington Post)

The Bortle Scale and Light Pollution

The Bortle Scale is used by astronomers to rate the darkness of our skies. It ranges from 1 (darkest) to 9 (brightest). For most of us, our daily lives are spent beneath a radiance level of between 5 and 8 and rarely venture into areas ranked 3 or darker- and what a shame that is.

Light pollution, while a testament to our technological advances, has blanketed our view of the universe and decoupled our relationship with the cosmos. For the millions of people living in areas where less than 20 stars can be seen in the night sky, it is practically impossible to imagine a natural sky blanketed with upwards of 2,500 stars backed by great ribbons of billions of stars which can be found in our Galaxy: The Milky Way.

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#NationalParkWeek continues with the Grand Canyon-Parashant National Monument in Arizona - jointly managed by the BLM and National Park Service. 

The monument includes more than one million acres of remote and unspoiled public lands in Arizona, with deep canyons, mountains and buttes, and scenic vistas. Here, paleozoic and mesozoic sedimentary rock layers offer a clear view to understanding the geologic history of the Colorado Plateau. The monument encompasses the lower portion of the Shivwits Plateau, an important watershed for the Colorado River and the Grand Canyon.

The monument is also known a vast landscape where the only nighttime light comes from the stars. The International Dark Sky Association recognized the unspoiled quality of its pristine and breathtaking night skies with an official IDA designation as “Parashant International Night Sky Province,” joining an elite group of other international Night Sky Places around the globe.

Photos by Bob Wick, BLM

vimeo

Lost in Light II is a short film showing how light pollution affects night skies using one of the most prominent constellations - The Orion. The success and reach of my previous film(vimeo.com/srirammurali/LostinLight) - made the news in over 40 countries and published on National Geographic, inspired me to make a follow up to help people even better relate to night skies and further raise awareness on light pollution. One thing I realized from my last film was that people were able to relate to the difference between the light pollution levels but not the Milky Way itself. The Milky Way appears more colorful to a camera than it does to our eyes and most people haven’t seen it. But, the Orion is a more common sight. It’s a great subject to help explain light pollution.

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vimeo

This video is worth getting through just for the amazing timelapse clips of the fireflies lighting up the landscape.

For a few short weeks each year, Elkmont Ghost Town in Smoky Mountains National Park becomes the site of the most magnificent synchronized firefly (Photinus carolinus) gathering in the world. Resembling an odd forest rave party, male fireflies enter the mating season by flashing their lights brightly four to right times in unison for about ten seconds, followed by a eight to twelve second darkness in which females may respond with their lights.

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vimeo

At the heart of the New River Gorge is world’s third longest single span arch bridge, as well as the third tallest bridge on the United States at 876 feet above river level. Every year, around mid-October, this moody stretch of the river becomes the site of one of the most impressive displays of Fall foliage colors, and that transition of seasons has become one of the biggest tourist draws on the East coast.

This video was filmed as part of SKYGLOW (skyglowproject.com), an ongoing crowdfunded quest to explore the effects and dangers of urban light pollution in contrast with some of the most incredible dark sky areas in North America. This project is being produced in collaboration with International Dark-Sky Association (darksky.org), a non-profit fighting for the preservation of night skies around the globe.

Originally premiered on BBC Earth: bbc.com/earth/story/20151112-see-an-entire-valley-change-colour-in-this-gorgeous-timelapse-video

vimeo

Videographer Sean Parker shows off some of the timelapse sky shots produced during his video and photography course in Arizona and Utah last year - and promises a similar course upcoming this year for anyone interested.

vimeo

The story of two small towns in Colorado that purposely enacted light pollution controls to recover their view of the night sky

vimeo

Impressive day and nighttime tour of Yellowstone National park, in time-lapse video, with some really neat shots of geysers and fumaroles beneath the Milky Way.

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Saying goodnight this #ColumbusDay from Grand Canyon-Parashant National Monument in Arizona.

The Grand Canyon-Parashant National Monument is a vast remote landscape where the only nighttime light comes from the stars. The International Dark Sky Association (IDA) recognized the unspoiled quality of its pristine and breathtaking night skies with an official IDA designation as “Parashant International Night Sky Province,” joining an elite group of other international Night Sky Places around the globe.

Twenty-two organizations throughout the southwestern United States supported the Grand Canyon-Parashant National Monument’s nomination for IDA’s “Dark Sky Park” status, including the scientific community. Its pristine “Gold Tier” night sky view creates prime research and discovery opportunities.

The scenery continues to impress during the day at this rugged corner of northern Arizona, with views stretching from the lower portion of the Grand Canyon to the pine clad peaks of Mount Trumbull and Mount Logan Wilderness Areas. Grand Canyon-Parashant National Monument is jointly managed by the Bureau of Land Management and the National Park Service.

Photo and GIFs by BLMer Bob Wick.

vimeo

We covered earlier today how it is International Dark Sky Week, here’s a video to go along with that titled “Losing the Dark” by the International Dark Sky Association.

Wishing you all a wonderful weekend from BLM Arizona’s Grand Canyon-Parashant National Monument!

Grand Canyon-Parashant National Monument is a vast remote landscape where the only nighttime light comes from the stars. The International Dark Sky Association (IDA) recognized the unspoiled quality of its pristine and breathtaking night skies with an official IDA designation as “Parashant International Night Sky Province,” joining an elite group of other international Night Sky Places around the globe.

Twenty-two organizations throughout the southwestern United States supported the Grand Canyon-Parashant National Monument’s nomination for IDA’s “Dark Sky Park” status, including the scientific community. Its pristine “Gold Tier” night sky view creates prime research and discovery opportunities.

The scenery continues to impress during the day at this rugged corner of northern Arizona, with views stretching from the lower portion of the Grand Canyon to the pine clad peaks of Mount Trumbull and Mount Logan Wilderness Areas. Grand Canyon-Parashant National Monument is jointly managed by the Bureau of Land Management and the National Park Service.

anonymous asked:

What's the best place in the western United States to see the Galaxy with your naked eye?

I don’t know that there’s one single objective “best” place. 

The International Dark Sky Association maintains a list of communities, parks, and reserves that are officially recognized for preserving night-sky views. This is an official designation, and thus excludes a lot of otherwise excellent viewing sites.

Here you can find a searchable map with several tagged locations. The map is overlaid with a light pollution map.

-RLO

Biophilic Cities

Bioliphic City

Definition: A green city, with abundant nature and natural systems that are visible and accessible to urbanities. 

If you have ever visited a small town with a bustling community, street vendors and markets- the spirit of the city caring about the environment and the people in it? That is an example of a Bioliphic city. 

The concept of a Biophilic city is much more attainable than we realize. I can’t promote enough the concept of a rooftop garden or “green roof”. They are affordable, extremely helpful to the environment, and saves you money in the long run. It offers cooling and heating properties to the building, and harbors plant and animal life (birds) to integrate the built environment into nature. The next step would be to create a green wall and green at street level. 

When is the last time you have been in a city, looked up, and seen a starry sky like this?

The modern light pollution makes these cities impossible to see nights like these. Cities are now making the effort to stop the excessive lighting by having dark sky ordinances. The International Dark Sky Association does its part in educating and promoting the benefits and beauty of living in an area that respects the night sky. There are communities, parks, and reserves in North America and Europe that promote the lifestyle, and if we took the initiative to make Salt Lake a dark sky city, imagine how incredible our night skies could be. 

This is a screenshot from the International Dark Sky Association website. It only takes a small group of people to get the ball rolling. 

Another group that I know of is Save our Canyons. Carl Fisher came and spoke to my Outdoor Education and Leadership class, telling us about ways we could get involved with the movement. Canyons are being threatened by city projects, and the issue is being swept under the rug. Getting the community involved with projects like this in Utah would help give them a pride for the state, standing up for the beautiful things that they are a part of. 

Overall, to achieve a bioliphic lifestyle, we have to come together as a community and understand the importance of having pride in where we live, and preserving that.