Inside-Stories

7

Okay, after testing so many different actions and failing to create my own, I finally found one that I’m really happy with and works for different kinds of lighting! So this is how I’ll be editing for this story!

If you’re interested in this psd yourself you can grab it [here]! It will be added to my resource page too!

  • what she says: im fine
  • what she means: Bowsers inside story from the Mario franchise had probably the best characterization and minute details of most mario games, portraying the characters' personalities exceedingly well- while keeping a steady plot and amazing pacing that has you completely immersed in certain scenes- compared to other games where they seem to mostly be flat and unemotional (especially bowser and the mario bros.) the added touch of peach being more powerful and the bros speaking italian is a nice bonus and the game manages to keep a light air of humor despite heavier tones such as bowser actually dying at one point but these features will always be overlooked as part of the game that will forever be known as the Mario Vore Game

Context: I’m DMing for a group who is playing Curse of Strahd. The barabarian, Bruce, forgot to retrieve his magic spear so it was confiscated by the law enforcement of the town they’re in. Seeing how dejected Bruce was, Zindara the warlock went and purchased a wooden spear made to be a child’s toy and used a bit of magic to make it sparkle. He then gave this to the barbarian and attempted to convince him that it was far more powerful than his other one.

Zindara: (IC) “Oh yes, this spear is extremely powerful. It’s a wonder I managed to get my hands on it, but I knew how upset you were to have lost your other one.” (OOC) I roll Deception to convince him this is a magical weapon.

He rolled a 23 while Bruce rolled at 2, so in awe of his new weapon he goes to show it to Larofin the paladin.

Bruce: (IC) “Look at this! Isn’t it amazing!”

Larofin: (OOC) I roll to see through the deception… 17?

Me, the DM: That is pretty obviously a toy spear. There’s even a price tag hanging off of it.

Larofin: (OOC) I want to roll deception to convince him that this is also a holy weapon used to slay a dragon… 19.

The barabarian rolls a 5 so listens in awe as the paladin describes how a holy warrior used this spear to slay an ancient dragon that had threaten to destroy his city’s temple and devour everyone inside. As the story is wrapping up the party’s “no-nonsense” NPC walks up and the barabarian calls her attention to his “treasure”.

Bruce: (IC) “Kamala! Look at this! It’s super powerful and rare! Zindara got it for me!” (OOC) Hah, jokes over now guys.

The NPC sees through the deception easily but doesn’t say anything for a few moments. She raises an eyebrow as she looks at the “legendary” spear, then at Zindara (who is trying not to crack up), then at Larofin (who is trying not to grin), then lastly at Bruce who is obviously very excited. There is a long pause before she speaks…

Kamala: (IC) “Wow, I never thought I’d see a weapon of legend with my own eyes. I used to hear stories about it; that only the most powerful of heroes are capable of wielding it.”

She rolled a 21 for charism and he, of course, rolled a nat 1 as the warlock and paladin nearly fell over laughing both in and out of character. Bruce is now completely convinced that this is a legendary magic weapon used by a famous paladin to slay an evil dragon, and thus calls it the “Sacred Spear of Dragon Slaying”.

sock-monkey-homunculus  asked:

Hi. I want to write an epic space opera, so I was wondering what are some classic points my stoey needs and what has been done to death? Also, fun fact, Charlton Heston's character in Planet of the Apes is from my town. Unfortunately, his school was made up.

Rod Serling once gave the best advice to writing: take however many books you’re reading right now, and double that.

This is probably not the answer you want to hear, but it’s a mistake to think in terms of tropes. A lot of people go into writing with their heads: they want to subvert expectations in a clever way. They write because they want to get a pat on the head for being smart (”in this novel, it turns out the Love Interest is actually the Dragon with a hint of Lightning Bruiser!”). Overused tropes and clichés aren’t the problem, though. When people say they didn’t like a story because it was cliché or overdone, what they mean is, they didn’t believe it.

If you want to tell a military scifi story, do that. It’s like a piece of advice an acting coach once gave me: no matter how many actors there are, there’s always room for one more good one.

If you want to tell a story about space pirates (to pick a particularly common scifi theme), tell a story about space pirates, but “don’t try to impress me, try to convince me.” This means identifying exactly what it is you want to say and convincing me of it. A lot of people bristle at this because for some strange reason, we have the first culture in human history that is suspicious of clear communication, and for some reason, loves ambiguity.

So, if you want to tell a story about space pirates, you have to identify what it is you want to say. Suppose you have the idea that all criminal organizations are is just “outsider capitalism.” It’s family and protection for people who have none of the above, and that the difference between pirates and a big business is simply that one is run by people on the outside who “weren’t invited to the party.”

So, if that’s what you want to say, a story about space pirates starts to take shape. Your main character comes to life, as he is the person the audience sees the story through and we like who he likes, trusts who he trusts. You start the story inside a big interstellar corporation, but our hero sees they practice all kinds of underhanded traits he later sees in the pirates, except the “big guys” get away with it. Since a good rule is that the main character is the person in the story who gets into the most trouble, you have him as a stiff executive who gets kicked out of a corporation, who then is forced to join the pirates because like everyone else there, he has nowhere else to go. Your main character is in some way an unfinished, imperfect person; the point of the story is to have him improve or learn something. 

At first, because he has the expectations the audience does, our hero believes they’re all cut-throats, but we see a different side to them: we see them not as evil, but people who are somehow unacceptable to society in some way. All the pirate characters are created to drive that idea home. One was pushed off his home by a corporation; one is a member of a religious group that isn’t liked; one is a cyborg, which are discriminated against; one is a runaway clone of an executive about to be chopped up for parts. None of them have families, since the point of the story is to show how organizations like this can be surrogate families. The story starts to write itself: our hero tries to protect his surrogate family (as our hero cares, we care, too), and we see the pirates get punished for things the “big guys” get away with. 

The finale writes itself: the pirates fight the big corporation and our hero chooses to side with the pirates even after a final temptation. Endings should feel easier to write than beginnings; a story is like a funnel, at the beginning, anything can happen, but as it goes on, the range of possibilities narrow until one final outcome is possible. 

See? Right there, we have a story that subverts expectations and does something interesting with an overused trope (space pirates), but subverting expectations is a means, not an end in and of itself. It’s all about expressing clearly what you have to say.

Beginner writers, don’t despair.

When you’re first starting out as a writer, you assume you have one good story inside you. Maybe 500 words? Maybe 2,000? 20,000 at most?

But then you start writing dozens of flash fics and short stories. You realize you have hundreds of stories in your brain.

Then, you write a novel. You write draft 1. Wow! Even if the quality is your worst work in years, you wrote 70,000? 80,000? 90,000 words? 

Then, you write the following drafts. The writing improves. You flesh it out. Maybe you added 20,000 words. 

You start wondering about publishing houses, query letters. You write query letters and actually send them

For a while, no one gets back to you. After some perseverance, and maybe more edits to your novel, you get an agent. You get a deal.

To think, you started off unsure of whether you would ever write 5,000 consecutive high-quality words. 

id honestly give so much to see a b99 episode of the squad going camping together one day. like, mayhem ensues, gems include:

  • rosa telling scary campfire stories and jake lowkey clinging onto amy for dear life
  • charles attempting to cook a gourmet bbq for the squad but something inevitably catches on fire
  • hitchcock and scully getting lost and jake and rosa attempting to search for them in the woods
  • gina building a Luxury Tent ™ and filming people for her blog 
  • terry relaxing in the corner playing kwazy cupcakes, oblivious to everything that is going on 
  • holt knowing a shocking amount of professional wilderness survival skills and prepares to chip in with lifesaving advice at the last minute, every time
  • however he surprisingly doesn’t account for amy bringing and memorising two binders’ worth of wilderness skills herself
  • holt and amy end up having a lowkey mentor mentee competition as to Who Knows What To Do Best in every situation that comes up. rosa ends up winning due to girl scout experience
  • bonus: 3 am and the entire squad rests peacefully around the campfire together after an Eventful day. jake is huddled close to amy for warmth, rosa is chatting with gina, charles is proudly serving everyone food (hitchcock and scully openly love it), holt is curiously watching terry’s kwazy cupcakes game. everyone can hear holt periodically saying things like “that was an error, i would swipe up instead of left.” 
  • the whole squad swap old stories and inside jokes, and all silently agree that this trip was a success.