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witch’s familiar, a super-rushed 8-page comic about a human named November, a crow familiar named Hemlock, and a witch named Moira, in which Nov gets her phone stolen and they both… get their hearts stolen? By? Each other? It’s gay. That’s all that matters. 

November belongs to @seasideleaside!!!!!

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So things are slowly progressing for me, and I think I can safely announce one of my print projects I’m working on for the Panel One Festival in June!

The Littlest Empress will be a 16-page wordless, greyscale comic about a youngster zhuchengtyrannus’ search for new friends! I’m very happy with how it’s turning out, and I’d love to gauge people’s interest in it online here, so I know if I should print up extras for online sale afterwards?

I won’t be setting up preorders or anything like that for this little comic, but if you are interested, let me know! I’m hoping it’ll cost around 10$ max, but I will update y’all as this comic and others I’m making for print are quoted and finalized!

How To Avoid Having A Pile of Dead Webcomics

This also means how to avoid rebooting a comic several times as well. As a former Reboot Queen, I thought I would post this for new webcomic creators or even ones who’ve been at it a while and are just feeling kind of uncertain about their work.


I actually posted this on a forum first, but thought someone here might also find it useful. XP Note that these are not unspoken rules or anything! First and foremost, do what you feel you need to! Everyone learns in their own way.

1: At the beginning, aim shorter. If you’re just getting into webcomics, try some experimental one-shots first. It’s the comics with no end in sight (or an ending waaayyy too out of sight) that are more likely to be left unfinished. If your projects involve characters or plotlines you REALLY want to use again, you can always leave them open-ended to continue them, or just move on to your grand, epic project after getting the hang of things a bit first. XP It’s just better to start out kind of slow and learn your strengths and weaknesses. Or even if you’re not new to comics, this is still a good way to experiment.

2: NEVER start a comic on a sudden inspiration. You want to make an art or some short comics when this happens, cool, but what seems great to you one month may seem kinda lame the next. I mean, sure, we all have moments where we’re not as interested in our comics, but if you pick subjects you truly love, it makes it easier to plow through those downer moments. XP Heck, this advice can go for ANY sort of project.

3: If possible, avoid rebooting old chapters because of amateur art/writing. If you absolutely need to for publishing reasons or to change some plot elements, then do what you must, but doing this can REALLY slow things down. That old art/writing may make your eyes bleed, but remember that most readers really don’t mind and even enjoy seeing an artist grow.

4: Even with a longer series, have an ending in sight. Again, kind of related to tip 1. Basically, unless you’re making a comic strip or slice of life or something, make it possible to reach the end of your comic in your lifetime! Consider trimming unnecessary bulk from your story.

5: Don’t let readers’ opinions sway you! I don’t mean ignore helpful constructive criticism, I mean people who question how a character acts, or say “I hope this doesn’t happen!” or anything that might be making you second guess parts of your story. I actually spazzed out and changed an entire character because people were considering her too ‘Mary Sue’, and a lot of the reboots I made were partially influenced by reader opinions as well! Make the story YOU want to make, don’t worry about your characters being cliched (heck, even if they are), or people having a different opinion of your characters than you expected. Stay the course! XP

Though also remember that it’s okay to have unfinished webcomics. They helped you learn and are still art, so they were worth the effort.^^

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A comiXologist recommends…

NOVAE #1

You can only appreciate Novae if you set a slow pace to your reading. With very little dialogue and an emphasis on emotions conveyed by very small details – a trembling hand, a shining pin on a coat, a furtive look – Kaiju tells us the story of Sulvain and Raziol in Paris 1672. Sulvain, described to us as a world traveler and expert physiologist, comes to the French capital to meet his friend, the astronomer Huygens. The famous scientist is working on new discoveries with the help of his assistant, Raziol Qamar, an eager and enthusiastic apprentice who is immediately intrigued by his patron’s friend.

Kaiju’s art gives the reader the impression of looking at a painting rather than reading a story. This impression is reinforced by the coloring: the first issue is nearly monochrome with its use of grey and blue tones, sometimes illuminated by moments of orange. The light of the candle shines on Razul and Sulvain’s first exchange in Huygens’ library. The harsh day light casts a glaring glow on Razul’s exhausted state after he spent two days working on mathematical calculations for a conference.

Be prepared to be hooked: this first issue gives us few details about the story and will leave you clamoring for more. We can assume that Sulvain and Raziol will grow closer but I’m excited to see how this relationship will develop. If you are looking for a slow-burn historical romance, Novae is the comic for you.

Camille Fabre is an online marketing manager at comiXology.

cbr.com
15 Comic Books You Had No Idea Were Being Adapted For The Screen
CBR sheds some light on 15 little known comics that are hitting either TV or the big screen sometime soon!
  • After The Wicked and The Divine won three Eisner Award nominations, the books were optioned by Universal Television, with Matt Fraction and Kelly Sue DeConnick’s Milkfed Criminal Masterminds production company. Production is expected to start in 2018. 
  • Valiant is working on creating their own cinematic universe, starting with Harbinger and Bloodshot, their sequels and, eventually, a group of crossover films featuring all of their properties. 
  • Due to the popularity of Lumberjanes and the critical acclaim it received, 20th Century Fox has already optioned the comic book, with Will Widger (The Munchkin) attached to the script. Fox also is apparently trying to recruit a female director before moving forward with casting. 
  • Terry Moore and filmmaker Angela Robinson are partnering to adapt the Strangers In Paradise graphic novel into film. Described as a “sexy, stylish crime story with tons of heart,” production is expected to begin in 2018. 
  • An animated series is currently in the works for the women of Rat Queens with Wiebe attached as its writer.