Immigrant-Youth

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On November 9, 2017 — two months after the Trump administration ended the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program — over 500 advocates for immigrant youth spoke out and took action.

Operation Dream Act Now — organized by immigrant youth themselves  consisted of an upswell of student walkouts and activity in Washington, D.C. and across the country. Their message? Demand Congress pass a clean Dream Act with no dangerous enforcement add-ons before the end of this year.

WHAT IS A CLEAN DREAM ACT?

A clean DREAM Act means Congress must swiftly pass this widely popular bipartisan bill without any additions or amendments that will put families and immigrant community members at greater risk for undue detention and deportation.

Photo credit: Gabriela Rossner

One of my friends from school was kidnapped this week by ICE

Cal State Los Angeles student Claudia Rueda taken by ICE this morning. Please mobilize and spread the word #FreeClaudia

“Early this morning, Border Patrol conducted a raid in Boyle Heights kidnapping Claudia Rueda outside her home in Boyle Heights, immigrant rights organizer with the Los Angeles Immigrant Youth Coalition and student at Cal State Los Angeles. Claudia most recently lead a campaign to free her mom, Teresa, from ICE detention after Border Patrol agents similarly kidnapped Teresa from their home.

When the officials showed up this morning, family members knew not to open the door since the agents couldn’t produce a warrant. But they got to Claudia anyway while she was outside moving the family’s car. For several hours her family had no idea where she was.

Claudia has lived in the US nearly her entire life. She participated in college-prep programs, was a student at UC Santa Cruz, and transferred to Cal State LA where she is currently studying Latin American Studies and has the support of many professors and campus organizations.Claudia has been preparing for apply for DACA but had been unable to gather the money for the filing fees.

Claudia’s best friend states: “Claudia is an extremely supportive, empowering, and hard working friend. All throughout high school, she encouraged students to continue their studies in higher education, becoming involved in afterschool programs like ESCALERA. Throughout our college career, she has continuously supported me, offered her home, and her wisdom to continue being a hardworking student and following our passions.”

Call Border Patrol in Chula Vista at 619-498-9750 to demand DHS not initiate removal proceedings and release Claudia to let her apply for DACA and get back to her family and completing finals.

“Hi, my name is ________________, and I am a concerned community member calling in support of Claudia Sarahi Rueda Vidal, DOB: 1/15/95, a DACA eligible youth, college student and beloved community member from Boyle Heights. Claudia has been a mentor in the community to other youth and has long fought for justice for others. I demand that Border Patrol release her to her family and community to let her apply for DACA with USCIS.”

FIGHT DEPORTATIONS BY ANY MEANS NECESSARY!
FIGHT ICE WITH FIRE!


*** this is a copy and paste from her group’s Facebook. Claudia was head of a group of people that collaborated with my MSA and BLACK student union as well as the transgender rights/undocumented students group TRUCHA at our school. This is clearly a targeted attack because of her activism. I desperately need everyone’s help in trying to free her.

teenvogue.com
I'm a Teen Behind Bars in an Immigration Detention Center
"I never thought I would be detained for so long for trying to save my own life.”
By Isabella Gomez

“I do not feel safe anywhere in here. I didn’t come here [to the U.S.] to work; I came here to try to survive. I never thought I would be detained for so long for trying to save my own life.”

We need a #DreamActNow

Systematic racism will be the downfall of US Soccer. (and YES I am including the Women’s National Team too

In contrast to other countries, soccer in the United States caters itself towards white, suburban, upper-middle class kids. Premier clubs and other expenses have single-handedly priced out those in lower-income neighborhoods. Can you imagine how many Messis or Martas we lose annually, just because of the pay-to-play structure of youth soccer? Immigrant families, who come to the United States bearing an avid love for the game, are unable to pursue their dreams due to the outrageous costs. (X

American soccer players come from places where incomes, education and employment rankings, are whiter than the US average, while the basketball and football players came from places that ranked lower than average on those same indicators. (X)

In regards to the United States Women’s National Team…the success of our team is indisputable. But ask yourself this, how much longer do you think we’ll be able to maintain our dominance if we continue to ignore lower- income, or, dare-I-say, minority athletes? Just take a look at USMNT for the answer on that one.  

washingtonpost.com
THIS IS NOT A TEST: Federal agents conduct immigration enforcement raids in at least six states
The raids mark the first largescale immigration action since President Trump’s Jan. 26 order to crack down on the estimated 11 million immigrants living here illegally.
By https://www.facebook.com/pages/Sandhya-Somashekhar/424900341023463

U.S. immigration authorities arrested hundreds of undocumented immigrants in at least a half-dozen states this week in a series of raids that marked the first large-scale enforcement of President Trump’s Jan. 26 order to crack down on the estimated 11 million immigrants living here illegally.

The raids, which officials said targeted known criminals, also netted some immigrants who did not have criminal records, an apparent departure from similar enforcement waves during the Obama administration that aimed to just corral and deport those who had committed crimes.

Trump has pledged to deport up to 3 million undocumented immigrants with criminal records. Last month he also made a change to the Obama administration’s policy of prioritizing deportation for convicted criminals, substantially broadening the scope of who the Department of Homeland Security can target to include those with minor offenses or no convictions at all.

Immigration officials confirmed that agents this week raided homes and workplaces in Atlanta, Chicago, New York, the Los Angeles area, North Carolina and South Carolina, netting hundreds of people. But Gillian Christensen, a spokeswoman for the Department of Homeland Security, which oversees Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE), said they were part of “routine” immigration enforcement actions. ICE dislikes the term “raids,” and prefers to say authorities are conducting “targeted enforcement actions.”

Immigration activists said the crackdown went beyond the six states DHS identified, and said they had also documented ICE raids of unusual intensity during the past two days in Florida, Kansas, Texas and Northern Virginia.

That undocumented immigrants with no criminal records were arrested and could potentially be deported sent a shock through immigrant communities nationwide amid concerns that the U.S. government could start going after law-abiding people.

“This is clearly the first wave of attacks under the Trump administration, and we know this isn’t going to be the only one,” Cristina Jimenez, executive director of United We Dream, an immigrant youth organization, said Friday during a conference call with immigration advocates.

ICE agents in the Los Angeles area Thursday swept a number of individuals into custody over the course of an hour, seizing them from their homes and on their way to work in daytime operations, activists said.

David Marin, ICE’s field director in the Los Angeles area, said in a conference call with reporters Friday that 75 percent of the approximately 160 people detained in the operation this week had felony convictions; the rest had misdemeanors or were in the United States illegally. Officials said Friday night that 37 of those detained in Los Angeles has been deported to Mexico.

“Dangerous criminals who should be deported are being released into our communities,” Marin said.

A video that circulated on social media Friday appeared to show ICE agents detaining people in an Austin shopping center parking lot. Immigration advocates also reported roadway checkpoints, where ICE appeared to be targeting immigrants for random ID checks, in North Carolina and in Austin. ICE officials denied that authorities used checkpoints during the operations.

[The ‘sanctuary city’ on the front line of the fight over Trump’s immigration policy]

“I’m getting lots of reports from my constituents about seeing ICE on the streets. Teachers in my district have contacted me — certain students didn’t come to school today because they’re afraid,” said Greg Casar, an Austin city council member. “I talked to a constituent, a single mother, who had her door knocked on this morning by ICE.”

Rep. Joaquin Castro (D-Tex.) said he confirmed with ICE’s San Antonio office that the agency “has launched a targeted operation in South and Central Texas as part of Operation Cross Check.”

“I am asking ICE to clarify whether these individuals are in fact dangerous, violent threats to our communities, and not people who are here peacefully raising families and contributing to our state,” Castro said in a statement Friday night.

Hiba Ghalib, an immigration lawyer in Atlanta, said the ICE detentions were causing “mass confusion” in the immigrant community. She said she had heard reports of ICE agents going door-to-door in one largely Hispanic neighborhood, asking people to present their papers.

“People are panicking,” Ghalib said. “People are really, really scared.”

Immigration officials acknowledged that authorities had cast a wider net than they would have last year, as the result of Trump’s executive order.

The Trump administration is facing a series of legal challenges to that order, and on Thursday lost a court battle over a separate executive order to temporarily ban entry into the United States by citizens of seven majority-Muslim countries, as well as by refugees. The administration said Friday that it is considering raising the case to the Supreme Court.

Some activists in Austin and Los Angeles suggested that the raids might be retaliation for those cities’ “sanctuary city” policies. A government aide familiar with the raids said it is possible that the predominantly daytime operations — a departure from the Obama administration’s night raids — meant to “send a message to the community that the Trump deportation force is in effect.”

Frank Sharry, executive director of America’s Voice, a pro-immigrant advocacy group, said that the wave of detentions harks back to the George W. Bush administration, when workplace raids to sweep up all undocumented workers were common.

The Obama administration conducted a spate of raids and also pursued a more aggressive deportation policy than any previous president, sending more than 400,000 people back to their birth countries at the height of his deportations in 2012. The public outcry over the lengthy detentions and deportations of women, children and people with minor offenses led Obama in his second term to prioritize convicted criminals for deportation.

A DHS official confirmed that while immigration agents were targeting criminals, given the broader range defined by Trump’s executive order they also were sweeping up non-criminals in the vicinity who were found to be lacking documentation. It was unclear how many of the people detained would have been excluded under Obama’s policy.

Federal immigration officials, as well as activists, said that the majority of those detained were adult men, and that no children were taken into custody.

“Big cities tend to have a lot of illegal immigrants,” said one immigration official who spoke on the condition of anonymity because the official was not authorized to speak publicly due to the sensitive nature of the operation. “They’re going to a target-rich environment.”

Immigrant rights groups said that they were planning protests in response to the raids, including one Friday evening in Federal Plaza in New York City and a vigil in Los Angeles.

“We cannot understate the level of panic and terror that is running through many immigrant communities,” said Walter Barrientos of Make the Road New York in New York City, who spoke on a conference call with immigration advocates.

“We’re trying to make sure that families who have been impacted are getting legal services as quickly as possible. We’re trying to do some legal triage,” said Bob Libal, the executive director of Grassroots Leadership, which provides assistance and advocacy work to immigrants in Austin. “It’s chaotic,” he said. The organization’s hotline, he said, had been overwhelmed with calls.

Jeanette Vizguerra, 35, a Mexican house cleaner whose permit to stay in the country expired this week, said Friday during the conference call that she was newly apprehensive about her scheduled meeting with ICE next week.

Fearing deportation, Vizguerra, a Denver mother of four — including three who are U.S. citizens — said through an interpreter that she had called on activists and supporters to accompany her to the meeting.

“I know I need to mobilize my community, but I know my freedom is at risk here,” Vizguerra said.

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Congress has a choice: they can either protect immigrant youth or continue to expose thousands more to deportation from their home.

We can’t wait any longer. Take action now.

Here’s how to participate:

1) Dial 1-888-778-6856 and wait for the “Welcome” message.

2) Get connected to the switchboard.

3) Enter your zip code.

4) Wait for your call to be connected to your Representative or Senator and demand a #DreamActNow!

youtube

Why We Must All Fight for the Dream Act.

By repealing DACA – Deferred Action For Childhood Arrivals – Trump has endangered both these young immigrants and the economic security of America.

In 2012, the Obama  administration created DACA as a temporary way to address the needs of young people who came to America as infants or toddlers, and know no other country.  

To apply and qualify for DACA, these young people had to risk entering the system by giving their identifying information. Once approved, they were granted two years of “deferred action” on deportation, with the promise that they could reapply every two years indefinitely.

This allowed “dreamers” to go to college, get a job, and pay taxes without fear of deportation. DACA was never perfect, but for 800,000 immigrant youth it meant freedom from fear and an opportunity to fully contribute to the country they were raised in. 

But now these young people are threatened with deportation. 

For no reason. These young people are not taking jobs away from native-born Americans.  Even the conservative Cato Institute has said that the economic cost of cancelling DACA would be $200 billion over ten years.  And that’s just direct costs. The Center for American Progress estimates that if we lost these young workers the U.S. gross domestic product would shrink by $433 billion over the next decade.

The moral case is even more compelling than the economic one.

These kids grew up in America. To enter the DACA program they already had to step forward and show that they were contributing  to their communities and then prove it again every two years to stay in the program. It is immoral to now put them in the crosshairs of deportation.

This is just the latest effort by Trump to play to his base and divide us, but we must not allow that. Americans of all races and creeds must push congress to pass the Dream Act, and allow these young people to become American citizens – without the Act being a bargaining chip for more border security or anything else. 

These DACA young people are our neighbors, our colleagues, and our classmates. They represent the the best of the dream that my parents and most of our ancestors had when they came to America:  To make a better life for themselves, and for their kids.  Trump’s attempt to divide us and fuel our differences along racial and ethnic lines is an attack on the America I believe in, and we must not let it stand.  

That’s why the DACA fight is my fight, and why I stand with the dreamers – and I hope you will too.

youtube

Migration Is About Survival, Short Documentary By grass-roots community based organization We are San Juan and Erika Martinez

San Juan Capistrano is famously known for the return of the swallows coming from South America to old mission town. Every year, thousands of people visit to celebrate the migration of the swallows. While the city prides itself in this yearly event, they continue to disregard the voice of the migrant community. San Juan has a large population of undocumented immigrants, and because it is small and isolated, border patrol strategically targets the community, harasses them, deports them, and instills a sense of fear in their daily lives. Just like the swallows, the migration of the undocumented community of San Juan is largely driven by survival. A survival that is continuously violated by destructive and invasive immigration policies.

Our homes, our families, our roots are in this country and we are Here To Stay. TODAY is the anniversary of the 1st Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) application ever released. DACA has opened the door for thousands of immigrant youth to pursue education and employment opportunities to contribute to their communities in positive ways. This year, we must fight to Defend DACA and protect their basic rights to exist and succeed. We have faced these struggles before - We have come together, taken action and we have won. NOW is the time to stand with our undocumented youth ✊🏽❤️ // 🎨 by @ashlukadraws

youtube

Video title: Translates “SKAM” to Chinese 

OK, so I just saw this and had to post it, because it is completely ridiculous but also verrryy cute. Here is what they say summarised: 

  • Kai Joseph Xu studies Norwegian and is translating SKAM to Chinese
  • For some reason this lead to him getting to meet our prime minister, Erna Solberg???
  • He asks her if they can please watch SKAM in China! Cute!!
    • she replies that she heard the reason it was blocked was the music rights, but that they are working on it and next season will be open internationally
      • liar!! ( typical politician) 
  • He says that over 6 million chinese people have seen SKAM !!!
  • And that 120 million follow SKAM on Weibo?? Can this possibly be true though??!!
  • He thinks Sana’s season will be exciting and that she is very beautiful (samee!) 
  • And he says the hardest part is translating the slang, and when characters speak “Kebabnorsk”
    • “Kebabnorsk” = norwegian multi-ethnolect commonly used amongst immigrant youth/ children of immigrants (particularly in oslo)
      • (just pointing out that kebab-norsk is not a name that the speakers coined though? it more likely comes from those who criticise it as “bad language”, i think?)
    • he points out mahdi as a difficult character to translate.. soo. rip him translating the balloon squad, particularly elias haha! 

earlier today my father forwarded two emails to me,
one along the lines of “all immigrants are sleeping agents sent here to organize and kill us” and another showing the head of the pirate party -
(liberal left, won seats in the recent parliamentary elections for the first time bc most uni students/activists voted for them bc they’re the one party that’s pro-human rights anti-capitalism which had any chance to place ok)
- at a “welcome, immigrants” rally and it was typed in a “True Colours Revealed, Bartoš is pro-immigrants, what will the youths who clearly voted for him just bc he wants to legalize torrent download do Now” manner

so i mailed back something like “💩💩💩 most of us voted pirates bc were not racist cretins but aight” and now im waiting to get disowned or something sjshhs

Head’s up: text “HereToStay” to 877877 to sign up for the Here To Stay Network (they’ll ask for your zip code and email right after as well). It’s a network run by United We Dream, a youth immigrant organization, and they’ll text you whenever there’s either something going on in the area or they decide to do a mass call-in campaign. 

For example, they texted me a few minutes ago about two young immigrants protected under DACA who might be deported anyway today and ended it with “Reply YES to make a call to DHS to demand their release.” I responded with “YES” and they sent me the number (I looked it up, it’s the office of the Deputy Secretary of the DHS) and a script for the call. I called multiple times and kept getting hung up on on different rings, which I’m guessing means there’s people in the office right now receiving a flood of calls so large they have to just keep manually hanging up all the phones. Making life hell for the person who runs the daily operations of the DHS is something I can get behind.

Sandor Bernath (1892-1964). ca.1940’s - Watercolour on woven paper.

Sandor Bernath was known for his stylized watercolors of sailing ships. He was a student of Edward Hopper. Born in Hungary on December 30, 1892, Bernath immigrated in his youth to the United States, and by the early 1920s had begun to establish himself within New York art circles. In January of 1922, he was given a one-man show at Mrs. Malcolm’s Gallery on East 64th Street.Although little is known about Bernath’s education and early training, this exhibition of nineteen watercolors included works, which suggest that by 1922, the artist had traveled and studied abroad. 

Reproductive Health, Rights and Justice Leaders & Organizations Join In Solidarity, We Won’t Go Back

Ninety organizations came together on December 13, 2016 in Washington, D.C. to declare our unity and dedicate our collective power to protecting and advancing sexual and reproductive health, rights, and justice in the United States and around the world. Every person has the basic human right to quality health care, and no individual or community should be left behind. Each of us should have the chance to live safe, healthy lives and be free to determine our own path – including if, when, and how to create a family. We will resist every attempt to roll back those rights or undermine those opportunities.

WE BELIEVE IN:

  • protecting and expanding access to sexual and reproductive health education, care, and services;
  • safeguarding and advancing abortion rights and access;
  • promoting health, safety and wellness for all communities;
  • fostering fairness and equity in sexual and reproductive health.

WE DEMAND THAT:

  • the policies of our government recognize and respond to the needs and priorities of the diverse range of individuals, families, and communities we represent, especially those who face disproportionate, burdensome, and unfair barriers to accessing quality health care, including women and girls in the Global South and low-income women, immigrants, LGBTQ individuals, indigenous peoples, young people, and women of color in the United States;
  • appointees, nominees, and elected officials uphold our nation’s laws and the U.S. Constitution, affirm protections and safety for individuals, especially those most marginalized, and work to ensure health equity in the United States and around the world.

WE COMMIT TO:

  • mobilizing to defeat actions that threaten to undermine sexual and reproductive health, rights, and justice in any community in the United States and across the globe;
  • exercising the collective power of our movement to create a world where all people have the rights and resources they need to thrive;
  • standing together with our progressive allies to advocate for policies that advance sexual and reproductive health and rights and that ensure all communities have the resources to exercise those rights;
  • working across movements to advance immigrant rights, youth rights, disability rights, LGBTQ equality, economic justice and racial justice and to ensure the safety of our communities.

We won’t allow roll-backs on hard-won rights. We will hold firm to ensuring that all people are treated with dignity, compassion, and respect and can achieve full reproductive freedom. Together, we will work for a world where equitable access to sexual and reproductive health, rights, and justice is realized for all.

See the whole list of organizations here>>