I'm white tag

PSA for my fellow gringos (or anyone else who didn’t know this)

Latino/Latina: originating from parts of the Caribbean, South or Central America. Gender neutral term (in English) is usually written as latinx.

  • Sentence: María was born in Ecuador, so she is Latina.

Hispanic: Spanish-speaking, or originating from a Spanish-speaking country. A term used in the US to classify people from a country that speaks Spanish. From what I’m aware of it ROUGHLY corresponds with the Spanish word “hispanohablante” although the two are not interchangeable in every circumstance.

  • Sentence: José was born in Brazil, so he is NOT Hispanic, since his country’s official language is Portugese, but he IS Latino.

Mexican: from the North American country named Mexico, NOT a language. NOTICE! not all Latinos in the US are from Mexico.

  • Sentence: Enrique was born in Mexico, so he is Mexican. Enrique speaks Spanish, since “Mexican” is not a language. 

Chicano/Chicana/Chicanx: a person of Mexican descent (usually born in the US)

  • Sentence: Anna’s parents were born in Mexico, so she identifies as Chicana. Her friend Miguel’s parents are from Colombia, so he identifies as Latino.

Spanish: a language spoken by many countries all over the world/ originating from the country Spain. NOTICE! not the only language spoken in Spain or South/Central America.

  • Sentence: Juan was born in Madrid, so he is Spanish. He only speaks Spanish, but has friends who speak other languages.

Quechua, Catalan, Nahuatl, Gallego, Euskera: other languages spoken in countries where Spanish is the ‘official’ language. Many Hispanics are bilingual and Spanish may not be their native language.

  • Sentence: Alba was born in a region of Spain called Catalonia. Even though she is considered Spanish, she speaks Catalan with her family and friends and considers herself Catalan.
  • Sentence #2: Sofia was born in Mexico and does not speak “Mexican,” but her family does speak Nahuatl, a native language originating in Mexico.


That is all.

Somebody reviewed the BBC doctor who spin off Class (which has incredible racial diversity, as well as disabled characters who aren’t there for inspiration, and lgbt characters, without it being a main plot point) show as being racist because it’s only got two main characters who are white (and they are the most main main characters) and it normalises hate of white people and i cannot tell if they’re being sarcastic or not but i’m honestly very annoyed by this review, I am white, racism towards white people isn’t really a thing, unlike white privilege, which does exist. We have enough/too many white characters in tv shows and after the shit white people put POC through I can see why they would hate white people. 

Going into Hidden Figures having heard a lot of controversy about the bathroom sign-smashing scene, I was concerned that the movie was going to be pretty pandering on the racism front. I was pleasantly surprised that it was not; in fact, while it did romanticise some things it also made some white people uncomfortable so, mission success overall probably. FYI I am a white woman, but these are some of the things I observed that I thought were good in terms of the portrayal of race/racism.

1. Every positive anti-racist action taken by a white character was directly and unequivocably prompted, if not demanded, by a black character. The white character doesn’t take pity on the black character; the black character states their situation firmly with their head high and demands change. Of course a there’s a degree of pity in there, bc the white people have the power and don’t technically have to do shit, but it was not just a bunch of White Saviors strolling around going ‘oh, the poor black women, let me save you’. There aren’t even any “white friends” really (eg white teachers, other helpful white people,) except as a few people from the office eg Kevin started to step up their games. And we don’t see any of the white people’s family lives, internal drama, etc, and at no point does anything become about the consequences white people may face if they stand up for the black ones. There is no ~woe is me, what I give for social justice~. And the black characters aren’t expected to be grateful for being saved.

2. Systematic & unintentional/covert racism was explicitly highlighted, rather than overt racism being used to cover up/excuse the ‘small’ stuff. The scene where Kevin Costner smashes the bathroom sign? follows NUMEROUS mentions & displays of Katherine’s going to the bathroom and the notice of her absence, her getting rained on and drenched, and then proceeding to crack and explain some hard hitting points, one of which was that somebody had put a coloured sign on the coffee and no-one had taken it off or stood up for her or even used her coffee, and one of which were that there were no coloured bathrooms in literally half of NASA and none of the white people had noticed. Also, the difference between black WOMEN’s and white WOMEN’s pays was directly targeted (”you don’t pay us enough to buy pearls!”) White characters and white audience members were uncomfortable. Racism, but also the Bystander effect and the ignorance afforded by privilege are called out HARD, with silences and camera shots that force it to hit. There is no Unacceptably Too Racist Bad Guy to unify against; it’s ALL about systematic racism and unintentional racism and the lack of willingness of WHITE people INCLUDING WOMEN to face up to it.

3. Allies are rewarded/thanked/forgiven for actions, not words.  The idea of things being “just the way they are” and “just because that’s how it is, doesn’t make it right” is brought up numerous times but they don’t leave it there. At no point is racism magically solved - not even by the sign-smashing incident. Their colleagues and superiors are still pointedly difficult. They highlight ongoing civil rights issues and violence against black activists, state vs federal differences, and informal inequalities. And the black women don’t accept apologies and platitudes; they only accept action as apologies, eg. “I truly think you [white lady] believe [that you don’t have anything against black people]” vs. said white lady actually using her privilege within the system and getting Dorothy the Supervisor position she deserved

4. White Women are White. Water is wet, but not every portrayal of women will tell you that. I think they walked a really good line with the white women, because while there were a few moments of female solidarity (eg. “She can also speak”) they were always presented as being ‘just as white’ the as the white men. Just as doubtful, just as racist, just as ignorant and/or unwilling to stand up to the system; eg they didn’t invite or let Katherine into the bathroom, they didn’t touch her coffee pot, or do anything especially kind to her until those points when some of the men were also starting to reach out. There were no ‘we’re all women here/in a man’s world’ moments. At no point did the main ladies have to accept or defend anything from, or happening to, the white women, especially not at their own expense. 

(and meanwhile, sexism within the black community and elements of the main characters’ identities as both black and female were also explored)

and of course

5. Black women as heroines. This kind of goes without saying, given the point of the movie, but it’s more than just ‘cool, black female leads’. It’s everything that means. It means the stories of real black women are being told. And not (very) whitewashed. It means black women are bestowed with extremely brilliant intelligence, sense of justice and strength of character as every protagonist must. It means black women are front and centre of their own narratives, exerting agency, portraying developed lives. They have friendships, families (all different), opinions, personalities, beyond the token and independent of, as well as inclusive of, their oppression. Non-black audiences are presented with black women they can an must empathise with, front-and-centre, and in relation to one of the greatest proudest moments of American history. Black women have leadership roles, they make landmarks, and as far as this movie is concerned, they basically save the world. When it all goes down, the entire country is waiting on the word and the work of a black woman. That’s rare af in terms of rep, and it’s a freaking treasure.

Yup. Never mind that Tiana was a black woman whose big dream in life was to start her own business in the 1920s American South where that was totally unheard of, and romance wasn’t on her list until she had her adventure with Naveen. And in the end she defeats her villain by herself while still a frog, AND breaks her own curse, AND gets married AND gets her dream of owning her own restaurant after all.

But nah, Frozen is more progressive because it supposedly elevates love between sisters over het romantic love. Even though Anna’s motivation is het romantic love throughout most of the movie, she spends more time with her male love interests than with her sister, and their sisterly love doesn’t really matter to the plot until the last second of the movie. Come to think of it, Frozen tries to do a lot of the same things PATF did, and gets credit for doing it all first.

I’m sorry for being so bitter, I’m just so tired of Frozen getting praise it doesn’t really deserve and of PATF getting swept aside.

I don’t know how to fully enjoy any of these moments without wondering if it’s the last.
—  Jay Asher, What Light
8

happy v-day from straight white boys everywhere!

homemade valentines taken from real texts from a certain boy