Holocaust Memorial Museum

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US Holocaust Museum’s “early warning signs of fascism” sign is going viral

  • The United States Holocaust Memorial Museum wants to make sure that fascism doesn’t make a comeback. 
  • A Twitter user snapped a shot of a poster from somewhere inside the Holocaust Museum in Washington, D.C. 
  • Judging by dollar sign symbol in the lower right hand corner, the sign looks to be a poster for sale. 
  • The poster is derived from a 2003 article detailing the potential warning signs of an incoming fascist regime. Read more.

I have 8 minutes left before midnight, when Holocaust Remembrance Day will end, so let me tell you the 8 things that I remember most vividly from the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum.

1. The entire museum is suffocating. It’s quiet and somber and can sometimes feel like you’re mourning the loss of all of humanity at once. It feels like a crypt, an urn, where 6 million people are interred.

2. The Holocaust didn’t start with Hitler screaming rabidly about filthy Jews. It started when Hitler slipped dangerous rhetoric into his speeches, blaming crime and unemployment on them.

3. There’s a three-story tall room where every inch of the walls are covered with pictures. Little kids smiling cheesily and older couples sitting next to each other, families. The only thing they have in common? Their lives were exterminated during the Holocaust.

4. A man nicknamed the Angel of Death did medical experiments on children. CHILDREN. He gouged out their leg muscles and introduced life threatening infections just to see how their bodies would react.

5. There’s a boxcar that you’re made to go into on the tour. It’s a real part of a train that transported thousands to death camps. It’s cold and it’s cramped, and the tiny windows don’t give nearly enough light to let you feel relief from the nauseating claustrophobia that creeps on you.

6. There was a children’s transport camp called Terezin, where an art teacher helped the kids express their frustration and terror through their art. They have it hanging on the walls there. It’s normal kid stuff. Butterflies and houses, people performing on stages. Underneath, the name of the child is written, and their date of death. 90℅ of them didn’t make it past 1945.

7. The worst room, by far, are the shoes. It’s a simple exhibit. Both sides of the room have containers simply filled with shoes, old and rotten. It’s not objectively sinister. Until you read the caption and realize that every last shoe came from someone gassed to death. That’s when you start noticing the petite flats and the heavy work shoes, the tiny toddler Mary Janes, faded red. You notice that each shoe had a pair of feet attached, and each pair of feet had a body attached, and each body had a life, a story, a personality, a soul, attached. And you read the poem above, which bitterly notes that the only reason that these shoes weren’t burned with their owner was because they were made of leather and not flesh and blood.

8. You end in a memorial Hall. It’s made of bright marble, and each wall bears the name of a concentration camp. There, you can light a candle. It’s small, it’s insignificant, it does nothing to stop the atrocities committed, but helps. You look above it, and you read: “For the dead and the living, we must bear witness.”

Donald Trump at Yad Vashem leaves a bizarrely chipper note for posterity

President Trump visited Yad Vashem, the Israeli Holocaust memorial museum on the edge of Jerusalem, on Tuesday morning. Flanked by Israeli and American flags, the president spoke gravely of the “millions of innocent, wonderful, and beautiful lives, men, women, and children … extinguished as part of a systematic attempt to eliminate the Jewish people.”

And, when he left, he signed the guest book: “It is a great honor to be here with all of my friends — so amazing and will never forget!”

Many tweeters juxtaposed Trump’s note against the sober message left by Barack Obama when he visited Yad Vashem in July 2008, while he was still a senator.

Read the full story here

anonymous asked:

How is Trump a fascist? Not trying to argue. Legitimately just trying to understand.

How is Trump a fascist? Let us count the ways: 

Twelve.

(source of list: United States Holocaust Memorial Museum)

A poster from the Holocaust Memorial Museum.

Calling Trump a fascist isn’t bloated and unjust political rhetoric. He is a fascist and he’s trying to push a fascist agenda as much as he can within our political system.

If we don’t learn from history we’re doomed to repeat it.

Can I rant? Okay. Here goes.

This is what I saw today at the US Holocaust Museum Memorial in D.C. this “All lives matter” sentence as someone’s supposed take away from what can only be described as a humbling experience.

If this doesn’t sum up the ignorance of the “all lives matter” movement… I don’t know what will.

Setting aside the fact people were wearing their “make America great again hats” indoors and through the exhibits (through the entire floor on refugees and how many Jewish lives were lost to people’s racism that could have been prevented), and ignoring the girls taking selfies at the memorial as well as screaming, unattended children, people kissing in front of hundreds of photos of victims, general disrespect, etc… *this* person’s “takeaway” was the one to break me.

All lives matter.

Where do you even begin to interpret that in the given context? I can only begin to assume they made this as their statement to black lives matter and the idea behind that movement.

To the author of this statement, I ask:

The Nazis that you saw photos of burning and shooting children, do their lives matter equal at the holocaust museum?

The profiteers whose vicious actions of stealing wealth and land from displaced peoples were depicted on the wall, do their lives matter equally at the holocaust museum?

The neighbors of Jews who you read about selling their friends, doctors and schoolmates out to secret police groups, do their lives matter equally at the holocaust museum?

Because by saying “all lives matter” at this museum, you are diminishing the lives that the museum was built to remember and mourn.

By saying “all lives matter” at a black lives matter demonstration, you are diminishing their plight and mission for equality.

Jewish lives matter.

That is the acceptable takeaway from this museum. Saying anything else is an insult to our families, ancestors, and the horrifically murdered.

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designers worn by princess madeleine: armani

april 15th, 2008: luxembourg state visit to sweden: day one

september 16th, 2008: opening of the swedish parliament

september 15th, 2009: opening of the swedish parliament

april 19th, 2012: day of events in washington dc

july 14th, 2015: victoriadagen concert 

(click photos for more information)

Yale historian, professor, and Holocaust expert Timothy Snyder shared the following powerful thoughts:

Americans are no wiser than the Europeans who saw democracy yield to fascism, Nazism, or communism. Our one advantage is that we might learn from their experience. Now is a good time to do so. Here are twenty lessons from the twentieth century, adapted to the circumstances of today.

1. Do not obey in advance. Much of the power of authoritarianism is freely given. In times like these, individuals think ahead about what a more repressive government will want, and then start to do it without being asked. You’ve already done this, haven’t you? Stop. Anticipatory obedience teaches authorities what is possible and accelerates unfreedom.

2. Defend an institution. Follow the courts or the media, or a court or a newspaper. Do not speak of “our institutions” unless you are making them yours by acting on their behalf. Institutions don’t protect themselves. They go down like dominoes unless each is defended from the beginning.

3. Recall professional ethics. When the leaders of state set a negative example, professional commitments to just practice become much more important. It is hard to break a rule-of-law state without lawyers, and it is hard to have show trials without judges.

4. When listening to politicians, distinguish certain words. Look out for the expansive use of “terrorism” and “extremism.” Be alive to the fatal notions of “exception” and “emergency.” Be angry about the treacherous use of patriotic vocabulary.

5. Be calm when the unthinkable arrives. When the terrorist attack comes, remember that all authoritarians at all times either await or plan such events in order to consolidate power. Think of the Reichstag fire. The sudden disaster that requires the end of the balance of power, the end of opposition parties, and so on, is the oldest trick in the Hitlerian book. Don’t fall for it.

6. Be kind to our language. Avoid pronouncing the phrases everyone else does. Think up your own way of speaking, even if only to convey that thing you think everyone is saying. (Don’t use the internet before bed. Charge your gadgets away from your bedroom, and read.) What to read? Perhaps “The Power of the Powerless” by Václav Havel, 1984 by George Orwell, The Captive Mind by Czesław Milosz, The Rebel by Albert Camus, The Origins of Totalitarianism by Hannah Arendt, or Nothing is True and Everything is Possible by Peter Pomerantsev.

7. Stand out. Someone has to. It is easy, in words and deeds, to follow along. It can feel strange to do or say something different. But without that unease, there is no freedom. And the moment you set an example, the spell of the status quo is broken, and others will follow.

8. Believe in truth. To abandon facts is to abandon freedom. If nothing is true, then no one can criticize power, because there is no basis upon which to do so. If nothing is true, then all is spectacle. The biggest wallet pays for the most blinding lights.

9. Investigate. Figure things out for yourself. Spend more time with long articles. Subsidize investigative journalism by subscribing to print media. Realize that some of what is on your screen is there to harm you. Bookmark PropOrNot or other sites that investigate foreign propaganda pushes.

10. Practice corporeal politics. Power wants your body softening in your chair and your emotions dissipating on the screen. Get outside. Put your body in unfamiliar places with unfamiliar people. Make new friends and march with them.

11. Make eye contact and small talk. This is not just polite. It is a way to stay in touch with your surroundings, break down unnecessary social barriers, and come to understand whom you should and should not trust. If we enter a culture of denunciation, you will want to know the psychological landscape of your daily life.

12. Take responsibility for the face of the world. Notice the swastikas and the other signs of hate. Do not look away and do not get used to them. Remove them yourself and set an example for others to do so.

13. Hinder the one-party state. The parties that took over states were once something else. They exploited a historical moment to make political life impossible for their rivals. Vote in local and state elections while you can.

14. Give regularly to good causes, if you can. Pick a charity and set up autopay. Then you will know that you have made a free choice that is supporting civil society helping others doing something good.

15. Establish a private life. Nastier rulers will use what they know about you to push you around. Scrub your computer of malware. Remember that email is skywriting. Consider using alternative forms of the internet, or simply using it less. Have personal exchanges in person. For the same reason, resolve any legal trouble. Authoritarianism works as a blackmail state, looking for the hook on which to hang you. Try not to have too many hooks.

16. Learn from others in other countries. Keep up your friendships abroad, or make new friends abroad. The present difficulties here are an element of a general trend. And no country is going to find a solution by itself. Make sure you and your family have passports.

17. Watch out for the paramilitaries. When the men with guns who have always claimed to be against the system start wearing uniforms and marching around with torches and pictures of a Leader, the end is nigh. When the pro-Leader paramilitary and the official police and military intermingle, the game is over.

18. Be reflective if you must be armed. If you carry a weapon in public service, God bless you and keep you. But know that evils of the past involved policemen and soldiers finding themselves, one day, doing irregular things. Be ready to say no. (If you do not know what this means, contact the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum and ask about training in professional ethics.)

19. Be as courageous as you can. If none of us is prepared to die for freedom, then all of us will die in unfreedom.

20. Be a patriot. The [new] president is not. Set a good example of what America means for the generations to come. They will need it.

anonymous asked:

Hey R.C., I was wondering as Holocaust Memorial Day passed by a few weeks ago if you could tell us some you consider most powerful or inspiring Holocaust Memorial Architecture/Holocaust related. I attempted to search through your blog but came away empty handed. Thanks in advance if you do respond and otherwise I understand and thank you for all the effort you put into the blog, it's really great!

I am surprised by your statement “I attempted to search through your blog but came away empty handed.” Therefore, I will include only projects previously featured on ARCHatlas, you can follow the link to see the full post:

US Holocaust Memorial Museum Washington DC ( images by rcruzniemiec aka archatlas)

Keep reading

April is National Poetry Month and I had a light and airy poem picked out for today. Instead, since this is the holiest of weeks for Jews, this poem seemed more appropriate. (I was going to throw Sean Spicer’s remarks into the mix, but I think his problem is that he can’t think on his feet which is a problem for someone in his position.)

I bought this postcard at the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum. Somber and sad as all of the museum was, these shoes, for me, were the most concrete way to wrap my head around the enormity.

I Saw A Mountain

I saw a mountain
Higher than Mt. Blanc
And more Holy than the Mountain of Sinai.
Not in a dream. It was real.
On this world this mountain stood.
Such a mountain I saw — of Jewish shoes in Majdanek. …

Hear! Hear the march.
Hear the shuffle of shoes left behind — that which remained.
From small, from large, from each and every one.
Make way for the rows — for the pairs,
For the generations — for the years.
The shoe army — it moves and moves.

“We are the shoes, we are the last witnesses.
We are shoes from grandchildren and grandfathers.
From Prague, Paris and Amsterdam.
And because we are only made of stuff and leather
And not of blood and flesh, each one of us avoided the hellfire.

We shoes — that used to go strolling in the market
Or with the bride and groom to the chuppah,
We shoes from simple Jews, from butchers and carpenters,
From crocheted booties of babies just beginning to walk and go
On happy occasions, weddings, and even until the time
Of giving birth, to a dance, to exciting places to life…
Or quietly — to a funeral.
Unceasingly we go. We tramp.
The hangman never had the chance to snatch us into his
Sack of loot — now we go to him.
Let everyone hear the steps, which flow as tears,
The steps that measure out the judgment.”
I saw a mountain
Higher than Mt. Blanc
And more Holy than the Mountain of Sinai.

Moses Schulstein

A young Willem Arondeus in his flat in Blaricum Later during the war, Arondeus led a gay resistance group in Amsterdam which was responsible for bombing the Amsterdam Population Registry offices. The attack was carried out on 27 March 1943 in an effort to destroy government records of Jews and others sought by the Nazis. As a result of the act, Arondeus was executed in 1943. His rescue efforts have been recognized by by Yad Vashem and the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum.