passive aggressive reminder that more than two genders and transgender people have existed for millennia

reminder that colonialism forced native societies to revert back to their gender assigned at birth or be killed

reminder that there has been Mahu in Hawai’i until it was forcefully taken and colonized by white america

reminder that there were Hijra in South Asia until britain colonized it and forced every Hijra person into concentration camps the same time the german holocaust was happening

reminder that We’Wha was a nonbinary person who served as an Ambassador to the Zuni people in 1886 to Grover Cleveland and was arrested for witch craft

reminder that in ancient Egypt there were people who were transgender and Egyptologists say that it was just people who were “buried wrong”

reminder that there are thousands of societies and cultures lost because of white colonization and we will never hear there stories

reminder that when this isnt taught in school it erases the history of people of color and queer people 

6

This Holocaust survivor has a powerful message for Sean Spicer

  • Holocaust survivor Roman Kent is speaking out after White House press secretary Sean Spicer’s now-infamous remarks on Tuesday. 
  • Spicer suggested at a press briefing that Syrian President Bashar Assad committed acts worse than Adolf Hitler because even Hitler didn’t use chemical weapons against his own people.
  • Kent, who was born in Poland in the 1920s and arrived in the United States in 1946 after spending the war in the Auschwitz, Mertzbachtal, Dornau and Flossenburg concentration camps, spoke to Mic in an exclusive interview in his office in New York City.
  • “He said, ‘Anybody can make a mistake,’” Kent said of Spicer’s apology in an emotional interview. “I agree with that. Anybody can make a mistake. But that’s not a mistake. That’s ignorance. … To have a person ignorant like this at the helm of our government — because press secretary is very important — it’s tragic.” Read more. (4/13/2017 1:00 PM)

16 May, Romani Day of Resistance.

Romani are usually excluded whenever the topic of the Holocaust/WW2 comes up, so it’s not all too surprising that the Romani Day of Resistance is very unknown to the majority. But it should be celebrated and embraced since it represents a change in the way Romani culture and identity appear in public space - where a history of resistance replaces a history of oppression:

  • On 15 May 1944, the underground resistance movement in the Auschwitz, Birkenau concentration camp BIIe warned the Roma that the SS guards were planning to round up the nearly 6,000 Roma and Sinti prisoners and send them to the gas chambers. 
  • On the morning of 16 May, the Romani prisoners did not show up for the usual morning roll call and ceased cooperating with the SS guards.
  • The Roma barricaded themselves into their shanties. They had broken into an equipment warehouse and armed themselves with hammers, pickaxes and shovels, taking apart the wooden sections of the bunks they slept on to make wooden stakes. 
  • When the SS guards approached the area, they were met with armed resistance from the inmates. 
  • The prisoners forced the guards into retreat, and though some prisoners were shot that night, the act of resistance allowed the Roma and Sinti prisoners to put off execution for several more months.
  • The SS were in shock because they had completely failed to anticipate this resistance. Concerned they might lose more men and that the uprising might spread to other parts of Auschwitz, they retreated from camp BIIe.
  • No Roma died in the gas chambers that day. The Nazis subsequently put the prisoners of BIIe on a starvation diet.
  • Later, on 23 May 1944 the Nazis moved 1,500 of the strongest Romani prisoners to Auschwitz I, many of whom were then sent to Buchenwald concentration camp.
  • On 25 May 1944, 82 Romani men were transported to the Flossenburg concentration camp and 144 young Romani women were sent to the Ravensbrück concentration camp.  
  • Less than 3,000 Romani prisoners remained in the family camp at BIIe, most of them children.
  • On 2 August 1944, the Nazis gassed all the remaining Romani prisoners to death in gas chamber V, although the Roma fought back on that dark night as well.

In Hungary the 2nd of August was designated in 2005 by the Parliament as “Roma and Sinti Genocide Remembrance Day”, yet most European countries make no or insufficient mention of the Roma victims in their official position regarding the Holocaust. 

Roma are still misrepresented by stereotypes that overshadow our culture and real identity and it should be needless to say that Europe should put some effort on making the Roma genocide widely known and recognized, to serve as a counterforce to the increasingly violent rhetoric and action against the Roma because and through them. Yet it does not seem like anything like that will happen any time soon. 

& Yes, please reblog this to make at least some of our history known.

3

Sean Spicer Just Claimed That Hitler Never Used Chemical Weapons

When another reporter asked him to clarify the comment, Spicer fumbled through an explanation and defense.

“I think when you come to sarin gas, he was not using the gas on his own people the same way that Assad is doing,” Spicer said.

“But in the way that Assad used them, where he went into towns and dropped them down to innocent into the middle of towns…I appreciate the clarification, that was not the intent,” he said.

Then, after the briefing, he released a statement saying he was not “trying to lessen the horrendous nature of the Holocaust.”

Then he sent out a clarification to that clarification, changing “innocent people” to “population centers.:

He then clarified the clarification to the clarification, saying "any attack on innocent people is reprehensible and inexcusable.”

Continue reading.

i still remember her, you know?

my grandmother, that is. a woman who loved to play shop with me, to feed me her twist on new york style cheesecake, who loved to gift me with dolls from poland and the odd teddy bear or two. i remember her warmth, the slightly shrill voice, the woolen clothes and those brown loafers that she loved so much.

but i also remember how i’d catch a version of her that i wasn’t used to - a woman who looked much older, with ghost-white knuckles, and a hardened face that was far too solemn for someone who gave and gave and gave - for someone who deserved so much more than what she was given. i remember how that version of grandma would speak, too. in a hushed voice, speaking in the mousiest of whispers, as if she were a teenager again, trying not to make a peep as she hid with her whole family under the floorboards of a family friend’s home.

i also remember the tears. how they’d just… appear, from nowhere. sometimes they’d just start falling from her face mid-sentence, other times it was when she was looking forlornly out of the large window in the living room that i’d drawn on as a toddler. they were not the same tears she shed as a teenager, after watching her mother be taken away by men who embodied and reveled in pure evil. they were cracks in the wall that my grandmother had built.

then there were those days where i’d catch her looking at her arm, and the faded numbers that had overstayed their welcome there. it was like black paint on a white canvas only that canvas was a person and that paint had not been spilled accidentally, but tattooed into the arm of a young girl who had lost everything but her humanity - something the man who gave her the tattoo never had.

but worst of all, i remember how she’d frantically run about the kitchen to make me a meal when she learned i hadn’t eaten for a day. i asked her why.

“because, bubula, i know what hunger feels like.” she replied. i didnt quite understand the depth of that back then.

like how i didn’t understand the tremor in her hand when we walked past a group of teenage boys who made a hitler joke. how i didnt understand why she had to pull over on the side of the road to sob when she heard that a fellow holocaust survivor had died on the radio. 

my grandmother was a fighter and a survivor and she was a woman who was strong as steel and as sweet as honey-dew. she was a woman who gave and gave and gave, a woman who deserved all the stars in the sky and pearls in the sea.

my grandmother was ripped from the arms of her family, she thrown into the deepest pit of hell, and she survived the flames. because my grandmother was a survivor of the holocaust.

never forget.

This year Yom HaShoah falls out on Armenian Genocide Remembrance Day. Let us not forget them either, and let us also think about the LGBT community of Chechnya.

I’d also like to remind everyone that while yes, the Nazis did target a lot of groups, Jews and Rromani were their primary targets and the only ones who they seeked to completely wipe out, whose cultures were irreparably shattered.

Here’s to the memory of the victims of HaShoah and the Nazi regime.