Henry V (1989)

Fashion films

This is a comprehensive list of fashion films by categories:

1. Documentaries:

  1. Diana Vreeland: The eye has to travel (2011)
  2. Marc Jacobs & Louis Vuitton (2007)
  3. The September Issue (2009)
  4. Lagerfeld Confidential (2007)
  5. Valentino: the last emperor (2008)
  6. Yves Saint Laurent: L'amour fou (2010)
  7. Bill Cunningham New York (2010)
  8. In Vogue: the editor’s eye (2012)
  9. Fashion Victim: the killing of Gianni Versace (2001)
  10. Notebook on Cities and Clothes (1989)
  11. J.Crew and the Man Who Dressed America (2012)
  12. This is My Dream (2011)
  13. A Man’s Story (2010)
  14. OWN Visionaries: Tom Ford (2011)
  15. Picture me: A model’s diary (2009)
  16. Don’t tell my Booker (2007)

2. Biographic films about designers/fashion icons:

1)     Coco avant Chanel (2009)

2)     Gia (1988)

3)     Factory girl (2006)

4)     Ciao Manhattan (1972)

5)     The bitter tears of Petra von Kant

3. Fashion-themed movies:

1)     Confessions of a Shopaholic (2009)

2)     Sex and the City 1 & 2

3)     The women (2008)

4)     Fashion (2008)

5)     Funny Face (1957)

6)     Prêt – à – Porter (1994)

7)      Rage (2009)

8)     Point&Shoot (2004)

9)     Garmento (2002)

10)  Mahogany (1975)

11)  Cover Girl (1944)

12)  Blowup (1966)

13)  Girl Model (2011)

4. Movies that generates influential styles/trends:

1)     Breakfast at Tiffany’s (1961)

2)     Clueless (1995)

3)     Nine (2009)

4)     The Antonement (2007)

5)     Legally blonde (2001)

6)     Monte Carlo (2011)

7)     Blade runner (1982)

8)     Grease (1978)

9)     Annie Hall (1977)

10)  American Graffiti (1973)

11)  Working girl (1988)

12)  Flashdance (1983)

13)  Rebel without a Cause (1955)

14)  Bonnie & Clyde (1967)

15)  Zoolander (2001)

5. Movies that won Oscar’s best costume design

1)     The Great Gatsby (2013)

2)     Anna Karenina (2012)

3)     The Artist (2011)

4)     Alice in Wonderland (2010)

5)     The Young Victoria (2009)

6)     The Duchess (2008)

7)     Elizabeth: the golden age (2007)

8)     Marie Antoinette (2006)

9)     Memoirs of Geisha  (2005)

10)  The Aviator (2004)

11)  The lord of the rings: the return of the king (2003)

12)  Chicago (2002)

13)  Moulin Rouge (2001)

14)  Gladiator (2000)

15)  Topsy-Turvy (1999)

16)  Shakespeare in love (1998)

17)  Titanic (1997)

18)  The English Patient (1996)

19)  Restoration (1995)

20)  The adventure of Priscilla, Queen of the Desert (1994)

21)  The age of Innocence (1993)

22)  Bram Stoker’s Dracula

23)  Bugsy (1991)

24)  Cyrano de Bergerac (1990)

25)  Henry V (1989)

26)  Dangerous Liaisons (1988)

27)  The Last Emperor (1987)

28)  A Room with a View (1986)

29)  Ran (1985)

30)  Amadeus (1984)

31)  Fanny and Alexander (1983)

32)  Ghandi (1982)

33)  Chariots of Fire (1981)

34)  Tess (1980)

35)  All that Jazz (1979)

36)  Death on the Nile (1978)

37)  Star Wars (1977)

38)  Fellini’s Casanova (1976)

39)  Barry Lyndon (1975)

40)  The Great Gatsby (1974)

41)  The Sting (1973)

42)  Travels with my Aunt (1972)

43)  Nicholas and Alexandra (1971)

44)  Cromwell (1970)

45)  Anne of the thousand days (1969)

46)  Romeo and Juliet (1968)

47)  Camelot (1967)

48)  A man for all seasons (1966 – color)

49)  Who’s afraid of Virginia Woolf (1966 – black & white)

50)  Doctor Zhivago (1965 – color)

51)  Darling (1965 – black & white)

52)  My fair lady (1964 – color)

53)  The nights of Iguana (1964 – black & white)

54)  Cleopatra (1963 – Color)

55)  8 ½ (1963 – black & white)

56)  The wonderful world of the Brothers Grimm (1962 – color)

57)  What ever happened to Baby Jane (1962 – black & white)

58)  West Side Story (1961 – color)

59)  La Dolce Vita (1961 – black & white)

60)  Spartacus (1960 – color)

61)  The facts of life (1960 – black & white)

62)  Ben-Hur (1959 – color)

63)  Some like it hot (1959 – black & white)

64)  Gigi (1958)

65)  Les Girls (1957)

66)  The King and I (1956 – color)

67)  The solid Gold Cadillac (1956 – black & white)

68)  Love is a many-splendored thing  (1955 – color)

69)  I’ll cry tomorrow (1955 – black & white)

70)  Gate of Hell (1954 – color)

71)  Sabrina (1954 – black & white)

72)  The robe (1953 – color)

73)  The roman holiday (1953 – black & white)

74)  Moulin Rouge (1952 – color)

75)  The bad and the beautiful (1952 – black & white)

76)  An American in Paris ( 1951 – color)

77)  A place in the sun (1951 – black & white)

78)  Samson and Delilah (1950 – color)

79)  All about Eve (1950 – black & white)

80)  Adventure of Don Juan (1949 – color)

81)  The Heiress (1949 – black & white)

82)  Joan or Arc (1948 - color)

83)  Hamlet (1948 – black & white)

Stanley Kubrick’in Favori Filmleri

  • Annie Hall (Woody Allen, 1977)
  • Husbands and Wives (Woody Allen, 1992)
  • Manhattan (Woody Allen, 1979)
  • Radio Days (Woody Allen, 1987)
  • McCabe & Mrs. Miller (Robert Altman, 1971)
  • If… (Lindsay Anderson, 1968)
  • Boogie Nights (Paul Thomas Anderson, 1998)
  • La notte (Michelangelo Antonioni, 1961)
  • Harold and Maude (Hal Ashby, 1971)
  • Pelle the Conqueror (Bille August, 1987)
  • Babette’s Feast (Gabriel Axel, 1987)
  • Casque d’Or (Jacques Becker, 1952)
  • Édouard et Caroline (Jacques Becker, 1951)
  • Cries and Whispers (Ingmar Bergman, 1972)
  • Smiles of a Summer Night (Ingmar Bergman, 1955)
  • Wild Strawberries (Ingmar Bergman, 1972)
  • Deliverance (John Boorman, 1972)
  • Henry V (Kenneth Branagh, 1989)
  • Modern Romance (Albert Brooks, 1981)
  • Children of Paradise (Marcel Carné, 1945)
  • City Lights (Charles Chaplin, 1931)
  • The Bank Dick (Edward Cline, 1940)
  • Beauty and the Beast (Jean Cocteau, 1946)
  • Apocalypse Now (Francis Ford Coppola, 1979)
  • The Godfather (Francis Ford Coppola, 1972)
  • The Silence of the Lambs (Jonathan Demme, 1991)
  • Alexander Nevsky (Sergei Eisenstein, 1938)
  • The Spirit of the Beehive (Victor Erice, 1973)
  • La strada (Federico Fellini, 1954)
  • I vitelloni (Federico Fellini, 1953)
  • La Kermesse Héroïque (Jacques Feyder, 1935)
  • Tora! Tora! Tora! (Richard Fleischer, 1970)
  • The Fireman’s Ball (Miloš Forman, 1967)
  • One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest (Milos Forman, 1975)
  • Cabaret (Bob Fosse, 1972)
  • The Exorcist (William Friedkin, 1973)
  • Get Carter (Mike Hodges, 1971)
  • The Terminal Man (Mike Hodges, 1974)
  • The Texas Chainsaw Massacre (Tobe Hooper, 1974)
  • Hell’s Angels (Howard Hughes, 1930)
  • The Treasure of Sierra Madre (John Huston, 1947)
  • Dekalog (Krzysztof Kieslowski, 1990)
  • Rashomon (Akira Kurosawa, 1950)
  • Seven Samurai (Akira Kurosawa, 1954)
  • Throne of Blood (Akira Kurosawa, 1957)
  • Metropolis (Fritz Lang, 1927)
  • An American Werewolf in London (John Landis, 1981)
  • Abigail’s Party (Mike Leigh, 1977)
  • La bonne année (Claude Lelouch, 1973)
  • Once Upon a Time in the West (Sergio Leone, 1968)
  • Very Nice, Very Nice (Arthur Lipsett, 1961)
  • American Graffiti (George Lucas, 1973)
  • Dog Day Afternoon (Sidney Lumet, 1975)
  • Eraserhead (David Lynch, 1976)
  • House of Games (David Mamet, 1987)
  • The Red Squirrel (Julio Medem, 1993)
  • Bob le flambeur (Jean-Pierre Melville, 1956)
  • Closely Watched Trains (Jiří Menzel, 1966)
  • Pacific 231 (Jean Mitry, 1949)
  • Roger & Me (Michael Moore, 1989)
  • Henry V (Laurence Olivier, 1944)
  • The Earrings of Madame de… (Max Ophuls, 1953)
  • Le plaisir (Max Ophuls, 1951)
  • La ronde (Max Ophuls, 1950)
  • Rosemary’s Baby (Roman Polanski, 1968)
  • The Battle of Algiers (Gillo Pontecorvo, 1966)
  • Heimat (Edgar Reitz, 1984)
  • Blood Wedding (Carlos Saura, 1981)
  • Cría Cuervos (Carlos Saura, 1975)
  • Peppermint Frappé (Carlos Saura, 1967)
  • Alien (Ridley Scott, 1977)
  • The Anderson Platoon (Pierre Schoendoerffer, 1967)
  • White Men Can’t Jump (Ron Shelton, 1992)
  • Miss Julie (Alf Sjöberg, 1951)
  • The Phantom Carriage (Victor Sjöström, 1921)
  • The Vanishing (George Sluizer, 1988)
  • Close Encounters of the Third Kind (Steven Spielberg, 1977)
  • E.T. the Extra-terrestrial (Steven Spielberg, 1982)
  • Mary Poppins (Robert Stevenson, 1964)
  • Platoon (Oliver Stone, 1986)
  • Pulp Fiction (Quentin Tarantino, 1994)
  • The Sacrifice (Andrei Tarkovsky, 1986)
  • Solaris (Andrei Tarkovsky, 1972)
  • The Emigrants (Jan Troell, 1970)
  • The Blue Angel (Josef von Sternberg, 1930)
  • Danton (Andrzej Wajda, 1984)
  • Girl Friends (Claudia Weill, 1978)
  • The Cars that Ate Paris (Peter Weir, 1974)
  • Picnic at Hanging Rock (Peter Weir, 1975)
  • Citizen Kane (Orson Welles, 1941)
  • Roxie Hart (William Wellman, 1942)
  • Ådalen 31 (Bo Widerberg, 1969)
  • The Siege of Manchester (Herbert Wise, 1965)
10

William I by Michael Gambon in Blood Royal: William the Conqueror (1990)
William II by Peter Firth in Blood Royal: William the Conqueror (1990)
Henry I by Clive Wood in The Pillars of the Earth (2010)
Stephen by Tony Curran in The Pillars of the Earth (2010)
Henry II by Patrick Stewart in The Lion in Winter (2003)
Richard I by Sean Connery in Robin Hood: Prince of Thieves (1991)
John by Paul Giamatti in Ironclad (2011)
Henry III by Rusty Livingstone in King John (1984)
Edward I by Patrick McGoohan Braveheart (1995)
Edward II by Ian McKellen in Edward II (1970)
Edward III by Ben Willbond in Horrible Histories (2009)
Richard II by Ben Wishaw in The Hollow Crown (2012)
Henry IV by Jeremy Irons in The Hollow Crown (2012)
Henry V by Kenneth Branagh in Henry V (1989)
Henry VI by Peter Benson in Henry The Sixth (1983)
Edward IV by Max Irons in The White Queen (2013)
Edward V by Sonny Serkis in The White Queen (2013)
Richard III by Laurence Olivier in Richard III (1955)
Henry VII by Michael Marcus in The White Queen (2013)
Henry VIII by Keith Michell in The Six Wives of Henry VIII (1970)
Edward VI by Jason Kemp in Elizabeth R (1971)
Mary I by Joanne Whalley in The Virgin Queen (2005)
Elizabeth I by Cate Blanchett in Elizabeth (1998)
James I by Robert Carlyle in Gunpowder, Treason & Plot (2004)
Charles I by Peter Capaldi in The Devil’s Whore (2008)
Charles II by Rufus Sewell in Charles II: The Power and The Passion (2003)
James II by John Westbrook in The First Churchills (1969)
William III & Mary II by Alan Rowe & Lisa Daniely in The First Churchills (1969)
Anne by Margaret Tyzack in The First Churchills (1969)
George I by Peter Bull in Saraband for Dead Lovers (1948)
George II by Richard Griffiths in Pirates of the Caribbean:On Stranger Tides (2011)
George III by Nigel Hawthorne in The Madness of King George (1994)
George IV by Hugh Bonneville in Beau Brummell: This Charming Man (2006)
William IV by Jim Broadbent in The Young Victoria (2009)
Victoria by Annette Crosbie in Edward the Seventh (1975)
Edward VII by Timothy West in Edward the Seventh (1975)
George V by Tom Hollander in The Lost Prince (2003)
Edward VIII by Stephen Campbell Moore in Wallis & Edward (20005)
George VI by Colin Firth in The King’s Speech (2010)
Elizabeth II by Helen Mirren in The Queen (2006)

*To be updated as necessary. Documentaries and largely fiction-based movies (i.e. The Princess Diaries, Roman Holiday) not included intentionally.

  • A King’s Story (1965)
  • A Man for All Seasons (1966)
  • Anastasia (1956)
  • Anne of the Thousand Days (1969)
  • A Royal Affair (2012)
  • Ashoka the Great (2001)
  • A Queen Is Crowned (1953)
  • Becket (1964)
  • Bertie and Elizabeth (2002)
  • Catherine the Great (1996)
  • Catherine the Great (2005)
  • Charles and Camilla: Whatever Love Means (2005)
  • Charles and Diana: A Palace Divided (1992)
  • Charles and Diana: A Royal Love Story (1982)
  • Diamond Queen (2012)
  • Diana (2014)
  • Diana – Her True Story (1993)
  • Diana: Last Days of a Princess (2007)
  • Diane (1956)
  • Edward and Mrs Simpson (1978)
  • Edward II (1970)
  • Edward the 7th (1975)
  • Elizabeth (1998)
  • Elizabeth R (1971)
  • Elizabeth: The Golden Age (2007)
  • Farewell My Queen (2012)
  • Felipe and Letizia: An Impossible Love (2004)
  • Felipe y Letizia (2010)
  • Fergie & Andrew: Behind the Palace Doors (1992)
  • Grace Kelly (1983)
  • Grace of Monaco (2014)
  • Hamlet (1948)
  • Hamlet (1996)
  • Henry V (1989)
  • Henry VIII (1991)
  • Henry VIII (2003)
  • Henry VIII and His Six Wives (1972)
  • Ivan The Terrible I & II (1944)
  • Lady Jane (1986)
  • La prise de pouvoir par Louis XIV (1966)
  • La Reine Margot (1994)
  • Ludwig (1972)
  • Marie Antoinette (2006)
  • Mary of Scotland (1936)
  • Mary, Queen of Scots (1971)
  • Mayerling (1936)
  • Mrs. Brown (1997)
  • Nicholas and Alexandra (1971)
  • Orlando (1992)
  • Peter the Great (1986)
  • Prince William (2002)
  • Queen Christina (1933)
  • Queen Victoria’s Empire (2001)
  • Restoration (1995)
  • Richard III (1995)
  • Sissi (1955)
  • The Crown Prince (2006)
  • The Duchess (2008)
  • The King’s Speech (2010)
  • The Last Emperor (1987)
  • The Libertine (2004)
  • The Lion in Winter (1968)
  • The Lost Prince (2003)
  • The Madness of King George (1994)
  • The Other Boleyn Girl (2008)
  • The Private Life of Henry VIII (1933)
  • The Private Lives of Elizabeth and Essex (1939)
  • The Queen (2006)
  • The Queen (2010)
  • The Rise of Catherine the Great (1934)
  • The Royal Romance of Charles and Diana (1982)
  • The Scarlet Empress (1934)
  • The Shadow of the Tower (1972)
  • The Six Wives of Henry VIII (1970)
  • The Virgin Queen (1955)
  • The Woman He Loved (1988)
  • The Women of Windsor (1992)
  • The Young Victoria (2009)
  • Tower of London (1939)
  • Tower of London (1962)
  • Victoria and Albert (2001)
  • Wallis and Edward (2005)
  • W.E. (2012)
  • William and Catherine: A Royal Romance (2011)
  • Will and Kate Forever (2011)
  • William & Kate (2011)
  • Young Bess (1953)

Did I miss any? Message me here!

anonymous asked:

Since you said watching Shakespeare films helps, are there any you recommend?

The list is way too long, but I’ll try to boil it down just to a few personal faves…

  • Hamlet (1948), starring Laurence Olivier 
  • Henry V (1989), starring Kenneth Branagh
  • Much Ado About Nothing (1993), starring Kenneth Branagh & Emma Thompson
  • Richard III (1995), starring Ian McKellen 
  • Coriolanus (2011), starring Ralph Fiennes & Gerard Butler
  • Richard II (2012), starring Ben Whishaw & Rory Kinnear

Hope you enjoy the films!

deadline.com
MoMA Slates Fall Bardfest With 21 Shakespeare-Related Films
New York’s Museum of Modern Art will screen an eclectic assortment of films based on or inspired by William Shakespeare next month in “Breaking Bard: Shakespeare on Film, October 12–24 …
By Jeremy Gerard

“Breaking Bard: Shakespeare on Film”

• Play On! Shakespeare in Silent Film (2016). A feature length celebration from the BFI National Archive draws together a selection from more than two dozen Shakespeare films from 1899 to the close of the silent film era.
• A Midsummer Night’s Dream (2014). Directed by Julie Taymor. With Kathryn Hunter, David Harewood, Max Casella.
• Coriolanus (2011). Directed by Ralph Fiennes. Screenplay by John Logan. With Fiennes, Gerard Butler, Brian Cox.
• Deliver Us from Eva (2003). Directed by Gary Hardwick. Screenplay by James IverMattson, B.E. Brauner, Hardwick. With LL Cool J, Gabrielle Union, Duane Martin. Based on The Taming of the Shrew.
• Maqbool (2003). Directed by Vishal Bhardwaj. Screenplay by Abbas Tyrewala, Bhardwaj. With Irrfan Kahn, Tabu, Panjak Kapur. Based on Macbeth.
• O (2001). Directed by Tim Blake Nelson. Screenplay by Brad Kaaya. With Mekhi Phifer, Martin Sheen, Julia Stiles. Based on Othello.
• Hamlet (2000). Written and directed by Michael Almereyda. With Ethan Hawke, Kyle MacLachlan, Julia Stiles.
• Titus (1999). Written and directed by Julie Taymor. With Anthony Hopkins, Jessica Lange, Jonathan Rhys Meyers. Based on Titus Andronicus.
• Looking for Richard (1996). Directed by Al Pacino. Narration written by Al Pacino, Frederic Kimball. With Pacino, Penelope Allen, Winona Ryder.
• Romeo + Juliet (1996). Directed by Baz Luhrmann. Screenplay by Craig Pearce, Luhrman. Starring Leonardo DiCaprio, Claire Danes, John Leguizamo.
• Tromeo & Juliet (1996). Directed by Lloyd Kaufman. Screenplay by Kaufman, James Gun. With Jane Jensen, Will Keenan, Sean Gunn. Based on Romeo and Juliet.
• Richard III (1995). Directed by Richard Loncraine. Screenplay by Loncraine, Ian McKellen. With Ian McKellen, Robert Downey Jr., Annette Bening.
• Rosencrantz And Guildenstern Are Dead (1990). Written and directed by Tom Stoppard. With Gary Oldman, Tim Roth, Richard Dreyfuss. Based on Hamlet.>
• Henry V (1989). Written and directed by Kenneth Branagh. With Branagh, Judi Dench, Paul Scofield.
• The Tempest (1979). Written and directed by Derek Jarman. With Heathcote Williams, Peter Bull, Toyah Wilcox.
• King Lear (1971). Written and directed by Peter Brook. With Paul Scofield, Irene Worth, Cyril Cusack.
• Macbeth (1971). Directed by Roman Polanski. Screenplay by Polanski, Kenneth Tynan. With John Finch, Francesca Annis, Martin Shaw.
• Romeo and Juliet (1968). Directed by Franco Zeffirelli. Screenplay by Franco Brusati, Masolino D’Amico, Zeffirelli. With Leonard Whiting, Olivia Hussey, Michael York.
• All Night Long (1962). Directed by Basil Dearden. Screenplay by Nel King, Paul Jarrico. With Patrick McGoohan, Marti Stevens, Paul Harris. Based on Othello.
• Forbidden Planet (1956). Directed by Fred M. Wilcox. Screenplay by Cyril Hume. With Walter Pidgeon, Anne Francis, Leslie Nielsen. Based on The Tempest.
• Hamlet (1948). Directed by Laurence Olivier. Starring Olivier, Eileen Herlie, Jean Simmons.

7

‘I can’t tell you how many boxes of matches we went through. Sometimes it would light, sometimes it wouldn’t, sometimes it would break, sometimes I’d light it and it would go out too soon, sometimes I’d light it and I’d be holding it in the wrong place. It took a long time. Eventually I think there were about two takes when it worked. But we went through a lot of matches, a lot.

Derek Jacobi on filming the 'O! for a Muse of fire’ scene in Henry V (1989)

Henry V films that I have seen and the verdicts

For allieinarden, who has recently become acquainted with the play.

Henry V (1979) (“the BBC version”)

[It’s been a while since I’ve seen this one, so my memory may not be good.]

Pros: This production was filmed (like most BBC drama at the time) on a set, giving it the feel of an actual play and making the Chorus’s Prologue actually seem relevant. It’s one of the few versions to pay enough attention to historical detail to provide reasonably accurate costumes for the early fifteenth century. The actor who plays Henry V actually bears something of a resemblance to him, down to that dreadful bowl haircut and a scarred cheek left over from the Battle of Shrewsbury back in 1 Henry IV (the historical Henry, at age 16, was shot in the face by an arrow during that battle). Abridgements are relatively minimal and include often-cut bits such as the Boy’s speech and the leek scene. The humor is allowed to remain—Fluellen is actually funny this time, and in general the cast is pretty good. (If you’ve seen the Granada Sherlock Holmes series, you might recognize this Henry V. He was also Watson’s old schoolmate in “The Naval Treaty.”)

Cons: Along with the stagey feel comes not-so-great production values. The sets are a bit obvious. Also, there’s not so much cinematography, which could have given it greater dramatic impact. As far as establishing mood and fully utilizing the medium of film, this version is rather lacking. Also, it has a bit of a dated feel as well (you can tell it was made in the seventies).

Henry V (1989) (“the Branagh version”)

Pros: This is probably the most cinematically impressive of the ones I’ve seen.” The visuals and the soundtrack are lovely (a particularly moving scene depicts the English army after Agincourt, trudging across the field and singing “Non nobis”). The St. Crispin’s day speech is extremely energetic, and the battles are suitably gritty. The cast is generally very good, full of well-known names (Fluellen is Bilbo Baggins, and the Boy [dubbed “Robin” by the credits] is Batman!), and their dramatic scenes are pulled off effectively.

Cons: However, most of the comedic scenes are either cut or played with unusual gravitas. Several important scenes/lines are cut. In an effort to demonstrate how the English are disadvantaged, attention to historical accuracy in the armor is completely ignored.

Henry V (2012) (“the Hollow Crown version”)

Pros: Hiddleston’s performance as Henry is good—very responsible and world-weary. An emphasis is placed on his faith, which is indeed a significant aspect of his character in the play though most film version gloss over it. Production values are excellent, and outdoor locations are utilized. The proposal scene is well pulled off. In addition, most of Henry’s harshest moments are included (down to the full frightening speech at Harfleur); this version doesn’t sugarcoat his character, nor is it a hatchet job. Some historical context is included, showing Henry’s funeral and a brief cameo of his infant son. And I won’t give anything away, but this version has a unusual twist on the Chorus.

Cons: The cuts are extensive and puzzling. It feels like watching Cliff’s notes sometimes. The “important” bits are ticked off, leaving little time for the minor characters. Many of these are cut, leaving Henry with about three or four nobles in his court. His brothers have vanished and their roles sometimes appropriated by the Duke of York, included presumably because his death has dramatic potential. (The historical background of York is ignored too—he’s the same person as Aumerle from Richard II and was Henry’s cousin. The Hollow Crown’s version is clearly no relation.) York’s death replaces the murder of the boys as the event that makes Henry angry for the first time. Essentially, many parts were cut and pasted and reinterpreted to fit the director’s vision—rather disrespectful to Shakespeare’s original storyline. This version is trying desperately to be different from Branagh’s memorable take on the play, to the point that it’s a bit dry and nondramatic. (Henry’s big speeches, “Once more unto the breach” and St. Crispin’s Day, are played lowkey, like pep talks to small, contained groups.) Furthermore, almost all comic relief has been expunged, most notably with Fluellen, who is played utterly serious. The costumes are visually pleasing but not terribly accurate. In fact, this production is treated as less of a history and more of a story, if that makes sense.