Heating

Imagine it’s an extremely cold winter morning. The heating system at the Tower is down and the Avengers are running around, trying to help Tony fix it. You’re sitting on a couch, in Loki’s tight, warm embrace. When Tony complains that you two aren’t helping, Loki tells him you’re cold and he won’t leave you to freeze.

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Air Conditioning - NRG Heating and Air Conditioning

Why Heat The Building When You Can Heat The Person?

by Michael Keller

Fall is rapidly approaching and temperatures have already started to drop in some areas of the country. It’s time to figure out where the jackets got hidden at the end of last winter and whether the heater is up for the task this year. 

Residential and commercial buildings were responsible for 40 percent of all the energy consumed in the U.S. in 2013. That total makes the lighting, heating and cooling of indoor residential and commercial spaces the most power hungry of all users, beating industrial and transportation consumption by more than 10 percent each. Buildings also contribute almost 40 percent of all U.S. carbon dioxide emissions. 

Focusing in, it turns out that space heating is the biggest energy hog and accounts for 37 percent of the total power consumed by U.S. buildings in 2010, according to the Buildings Energy Data Book

Why isn’t there a smarter way than heating rooms regardless of whether people are in them or that the living things that occupy a space take up only a fraction of the conditioned area?

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Winter notes:
I moved into my new house late in the season, and had no time to bring in wood. I decided to try compressed wood bricks. They have really worked well. They burn slower then lumber and leave almost no ash. They light easy and fast. I figure a ton of bricks equates to about 1 ¾ cord the way we are burning. Right now I have a bout 3.5 tones out in the garage. I think that will bring me through the winter. I got it delivered at $210 a ton. I will still bring in wood if I can get it free, but I think I am going to buy at least 2 tons of bricks each winter.