Heating

This is the tumblr Remembrall.

Have you

-texted everyone back?

-done your homework?

-left the oven on?

-fed your pets today?

-forgotten any hot beverages?

-forgotten a birthday?

-eaten today?

-told somebody you love them?

-remembered every appointment/meeting that you had today?

Feel free to add things to the list!

A couple that wanted to live sustainably in Stockholm had to figure out a way to survive without heat because the winter temperatures average below freezing. They solved their problem by building a greenhouse around their home, which keeps them warm and allows them to grow foods that normally wouldn’t survive Swedish winters. Source

2
Japanese Students Create Brilliant Straw Home Heated by Compost 
On Inhabitat - Sustainable Design Innovation, Eco Architecture, Green Building

Japanese students at Waseda University have designed and built an innovative straw house that produces its own heat through agricultural fermentation. During the cold months, dried straw is composted in acrylic cases within the house using the low-odor Japanese “bokashi” method. The fermentation naturally heats up the house by generating 30° celsius heat for up to four weeks.

The project, called “A Recipe To Live,” stands in the coastal town of Taiki-cho in Hokkaido. It was designed by students Masaki Ogasawara, Keisuke Tsukada and Erika Mikami to follow the natural cycles of the dairy farm town, which features many straw pastures.

During the hot summer months, the natural shelter dries straw inside transparent window shelves. These shelves serve as “heat shield panels,” and they release cool moisture as the straw dries. In the winter months, the straw is composted indoors to produce a source of heat through microbial fermentation. The house’s grass walls need to be changed a few times throughout the year, but they provide a natural system of heating and cooling that requires zero energy.

Photos by LIXIL

#Japan #compost #straw #bokashi #heating
[tinyhousedarling]
Why Heat The Building When You Can Heat The Person?

by Michael Keller

Fall is rapidly approaching and temperatures have already started to drop in some areas of the country. It’s time to figure out where the jackets got hidden at the end of last winter and whether the heater is up for the task this year. 

Residential and commercial buildings were responsible for 40 percent of all the energy consumed in the U.S. in 2013. That total makes the lighting, heating and cooling of indoor residential and commercial spaces the most power hungry of all users, beating industrial and transportation consumption by more than 10 percent each. Buildings also contribute almost 40 percent of all U.S. carbon dioxide emissions. 

Focusing in, it turns out that space heating is the biggest energy hog and accounts for 37 percent of the total power consumed by U.S. buildings in 2010, according to the Buildings Energy Data Book

Why isn’t there a smarter way than heating rooms regardless of whether people are in them or that the living things that occupy a space take up only a fraction of the conditioned area?

Keep reading