President Trump has recently taken a series of what appear to be bold executive actions to reverse Obama-era policies: declining to re-certify the Iran nuclear deal, halting subsidy payments to insurance companies and setting an expiration date for the DACA immigration program. But, in so doing, he’s dumping thorny problems on a GOP-controlled Congress already struggling to rack up significant legislative accomplishments.

This did not go unnoticed by one of the top Democrats in Congress. Trump “throws destructive bones to his base then tells Congress to fix it: Iran, Health care, Puerto Rico,” Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., tweeted Saturday.

While Trump said Friday that Iran had violated “the spirit” of the 2015 nuclear deal, he didn’t pull out of the multi-nation agreement, at least not yet. Instead, he opened the door for congressional action — and that’s exactly what he’s asking for.

Trump’s Executive Actions May Mean More Headaches For Struggling Congress

Photo: Drew Angerer/Getty Images

That totally American feel when you take your kid to the ER for something because the pediatrician said to and then a month later you get a bill where 75% of the visit wasn’t covered by insurance because apparently the ER doc works for a group that is not covered by your insurance plan

5 Biggest Myths About Planned Parenthood: DEBUNKED

There is a lot of misinformation out there about Planned Parenthood — much of which has been pushed forward by anti-women’s health politicians and groups focused on blocking patients from turning to Planned Parenthood health centers for reproductive health care.

They’re trying to block people with Medicaid coverage from accessing preventive care at Planned Parenthood health centers — including birth control, cancer screenings, and STD/STI testing and treatment.


Myth #1: Other providers can absorb Planned Parenthood’s patient base

As experts have demonstrated over and over again, community health centers don’t have the capacity to absorb the 2.4 million Planned Parenthood patients.

Repeating the same lie over and over again doesn’t make it true. So when House Speaker Paul Ryan and other anti-abortion politicians in Washington say that the country’s overburdened, publicly funded community health centers (CHCs) will take up the slack in the event these politicians “defund” Planned Parenthood, don’t believe them for a minute. Better yet, call your U.S. senators to let them know the facts.

Defunding,” by the way, doesn’t stop federal taxpayer money from paying for abortions – because federal law already prohibits federal dollars from going to abortion, except in dire circumstances. Instead, “defunding” simply blocks patients who rely on public health care funds from getting care at Planned Parenthood health centers.

Read More: No, Community Health Centers Cannot Absorb Planned Parenthood Patients


Myth #2: Planned Parenthood is unpopular and should be defunded

20 separate nationwide polls and an additional 12 polls in key states show strong favorability for Planned Parenthood and strong opposition to efforts in Congress to block patients from accessing high-quality, lifesaving care at Planned Parenthood.

These poll results stem from the deep and longstanding relationship that many Americans have with Planned Parenthood, the nation’s leading provider of reproductive health care and sex education. For a century, people have relied on Planned Parenthood for care and information, and each year Planned Parenthood health centers serve millions of patients essential services, such as birth control, lifesaving cancer screenings, safe and legal abortion, and other high-quality health care.

An estimated one in five American women has relied on Planned Parenthood for care in her lifetime.

Read More: Fact: Public Overwhelmingly Supports Planned Parenthood


Myth #3: Planned Parenthood uses federal tax dollars for abortions

Does the Government Fund Planned Parenthood?

With all the talk in Washington about “defunding Planned Parenthood,” you might think there’s a specific, Planned Parenthood line item in the federal budget that Congress and the president can just zero out. Nothing could be further from the truth.

Most federal funds come through Medicaid, the government-funded health insurance plan for people with low incomes. Just like other kinds of insurance, Medicaid reimburses Planned Parenthood’s doctors and nurses for the preventive medical services they provide, including lifesaving cancer screenings, HIV tests, and birth control.

Read More: How Federal Funding Works at Planned Parenthood


Myth #4: Planned Parenthood has its own line item in the federal budget

Fact: There is no line item in the federal budget that goes to Planned Parenthood.

The phrase “defunding” Planned Parenthood is a misnomer.

Planned Parenthood does not receive a blank check from the federal government.

Just like hospitals, Planned Parenthood health centers get Medicaid reimbursements for critical services provided to low-income patients — services like birth control, cancer screenings, and STD testing and treatment.

And per the Hyde Amendment (which has been the law for more than 40 years) — federal Medicaid funds do not go toward abortion (with limited exceptions outlined under Hyde).

More than 50% of Planned Parenthood’s patients rely on Medicaid to access preventive care. The Senate’s “Trumpcare” bill would block many Americans from getting the affordable health care they rely on.


Myth #5: “Defunding” Planned Parenthood will save the country money

No, “defunding” Planned Parenthood will not save the country money.

Efforts to shut down Planned Parenthood threaten to harm women’s health and their economic security. And these efforts don’t make fiscal sense for the country — every public dollar spent on family planning services is estimated to save the government $7.09 in state and federal dollars.

Most people think on this anniversary that two buildings came down that day and 2,753 innocent lives were lost [in New York City]. … But since then, about 2,000 [more] people have died because of their illnesses. They, too, are heroes. And in many ways — I talk to a lot of them — they wish they would have died that day, because what they have had to go through and fight, not only their illnesses but the bureaucracy and the poor leadership, and to see their other friends pass away from Sept. 11-related illnesses. These men and women have been through the ringer, through the mill. …

We call ourselves the greatest nation in the world. But yet we have a strange way of repeating history, and letting veterans come home from war, or 9/11 responders, or just responders now across the nation, how they sacrifice themselves and then we don’t take care of them. That’s sad.

—  John Feal, 9/11 first responder and activist, with Terry Gross 
  • John McCain: *had surgery and got the best health care treatment money can buy*
  • John McCain: *was diagnosed with cancer and will continue to get great health care treatment*
  • John McCain: *flies out to the Senate to vote on the future of health care coverage for millions and gives a long speech about how bad the GOP health care bill is, how he hates how the republicans went about crafting the bill, and how he thinks bipartisanship is the answer*
  • John McCain: *votes yes to move the motion forward anyways*
washingtonpost.com
Sanders will introduce universal health care, backed by 15 Democrats
Republicans, bruised and exhausted by a failed campaign to repeal the Affordable Care Act, were giddy about the chance to attack Democrats and Sanders.
By https://www.facebook.com/daveweigel?fref=ts

Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.) will introduce legislation on Wednesday that would expand Medicare into a universal health insurance program with the backing of at least 15 Democratic senators — a record level of support for an idea that had been relegated to the fringes during the last Democratic presidency.

“This is where the country has got to go,” Sanders said in an interview at his Senate office. “Right now, if we want to move away from a dysfunctional, wasteful, bureaucratic system into a rational health-care system that guarantees coverage to everyone in a cost-effective way, the only way to do it is Medicare for All.”

Sanders’s bill, the Medicare for All Act of 2017, has no chance of passage in a Republican-run Congress. But after months of behind-the-scenes meetings and a public pressure campaign, the bill is already backed by most of the senators seen as likely 2020 Democratic candidates — if not by most senators facing tough reelection battles in 2018.

The bill would revolutionize America’s health-care system, replacing it with a public system that would be paid for by higher taxes. Everything from emergency surgery to prescription drugs, from mental health to eye care, would be covered, with no co-payments. Americans under 18 would immediately obtain “universal Medicare cards,” while Americans not currently eligible for Medicare would be phased into the program over four years. Employer-provided health care would be replaced, with the employers paying higher taxes but no longer on the hook for insurance.

Private insurers would remain, with fewer customers, to pay for elective treatments such as plastic surgery — a system similar to Australia, which President Trump has praised for having a “much better” insurance regime than the United States.

But the market-based changes of the Affordable Care Act would be replaced as Medicare becomes the country’s universal insurer. Doctors would be reimbursed by the government; providers would sign a yearly participation agreement with Medicare to remain with the system.

“When you have co-payments — when you say that health care is not a right for everybody, whether you’re poor or whether you’re a billionaire — the evidence suggests that it becomes a disincentive for people to get the health care they need,” Sanders said. “Depending on the level of the copayment, it may cost more to figure out how you collect it than to not have the copayment at all.”

As he described his legislation, Sanders focused on its simplicity, suggesting that Americans would be happy to pay higher taxes if it meant the end of wrangling with health-care companies. The size of the tax increase, he said, would be determined in a separate bill.

(Continue Reading)

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A deleted scene from 103 health care. Any ideas on signs for Dwight’s temporary office/workspace?