HarperCollins

Happy World Book Day!

For all you book lovers, pictured here (from our 200th anniversary exhibit at Columbia University’s Rare Book & Manuscript Library), Harper’s New England School Library, published by Harper & Brothers in 1842-43. This set 75 volumes was issued and shipped in its own pine board cabinet fitted with shelves, a door with a lock and key, and a top piece on the back that allowed it to be hung on a wall. 

“The Hate U Give” and The Reviews I Hate.

***DISCLAIMER: I saw a lot of the reviews mentioned weeks ago, mostly during release week.***


So, first off, yay! THE HATE U GIVE is a #1 fucking New York Times Bestseller. I can’t be happier about this.

Originally posted by thecynicalcrayon

THE HATE U GIVE (aka THUG, if you’ve seen the hashtag on Twitter) by Angie Thomas is a truly revolutionary book. It’s introduced to the YA community and publishing industry that not only do diverse stories written by people of color and marginalized writers matter, but also that they are demanded by consumers. For years, agents, editors and publishing houses were saying that there was no market for books like THUG. Welp. As it turns out, that was just fake news! Anyway, THUG hitting the New York Times is a massive deal, and I think we’ll see more changes within the industry. At least, one can hope.

The point of this post though is to open up the discussion of how to talk about THUG without being problematic. And this is mostly aimed at white reviewers, bloggers, journalists, etc. I’ve read several reviews, blog posts, Tweets, and general articles about THUG that rubbed me the wrong way, and I’m just going to highlight some of those things here.

My thoughts are probably going to be scattered and this might have a zillion typos because I’ve not yet had coffee and it’s early for me, but just hang with me.

First off – let’s start with the title. THE HATE U GIVE. It comes from Tupac Shakur who had a tattoo and a life motto of: T.H.U.G.L.I.F.E. It stood for “The Hate U Give Little Infants Fucks Everybody.” It’s a statement of what white society feeds into our youth (hatred, racism, and systems of oppression) and how it comes back around with long, devastating effects and stereotypes between white society and the black community. That’s why a lot of times when we see black and brown kids getting gunned down by racists, we’re always hearing that, “they were no angel. They were just a thug.” This is what Tupac was warning us about. 

The usage of the letter “U” and not “you” is AAVE. The letter “U” is deeply rooted in black culture, mostly through music. I’ve seen a lot of people (usually white reviewers) write “THE HATE YOU GIVE” and though a lot of people don’t get corrected, it’s still kind of a microaggression. If you find that annoying, it’s probably because you’ve internalized that your way of speaking is superior, thus, walking the lines of white supremacy. Ignoring the usage of the letter “U” is erasure of an intimate element to Angie Thomas’s novel and black culture. Please don’t intentionally correct the title to “THE HATE YOU GIVE.” That’s offensive.

Speaking of AAVE:

AAVE is African American Vernacular English. It’s a whole rule-bound dialect of English with very clear, defined grammar structures. THUG is full of AAVE, which is part of the reason I love it so much. If in your review, you mention something along the lines of “a language deficit” or “incorrect/ungrammatical” structures, that’s problematic logic. Just because you don’t understand something doesn’t make it wrong. If you don’t understand what something means, please don’t hesitate to Google, if you can. It will save you.

However, Starr, the main character in THUG is constantly code-switching. Code-switching is when black people switch our behavior and language to certain navigate situations. It’s how we balance who we are with who we have to be at times. Starr lives in the hood, but goes to a very “preppy” school in the suburbs where she’s one of the only black kids in her class. She speaks and behaves differently around her friends than she does when she’s at school and around white folks because she absolutely has to. It’s a survival tactic. That’s a real thing that people have to do. So, stop calling it “inauthentic” and “unrealistic.”

Which brings me to…

Comparisons to novels by other black authors

It’s important not to box in black culture, especially when it comes to language. Yes, we code switch. Yes, we manipulate the English language. But black people are not a monolith. When you read books by black authors who write black characters don’t expect them to use AAVE in it and don’t expect them not to. We know standard English. A lot of us have degrees in English. In a lot of reviews by white reviewers, I’m seeing people compare THUG to ALL AMERICAN BOYS. Just stop it. Don’t. Do. This. You’re totally allowed to like one more than the other and whatever, but comparing the two, saying one is “more realistic” than the other because it fulfills whatever prejudiced views you have of black people and our experiences is pretty dang racist, if you didn’t know.

Lastly, for now because I may come back to this: #BlackLivesMatter

 

If you haven’t already, go pick up THE HATE U GIVE by Angie Thomas. You won’t regret it. It’s amazing and beautiful and heartbreaking and real as fuck.

Originally posted by usedpimpa

Some nights were so / sensory I felt that starlight landing on my back / and believed I could set fire to things with my fingers
—  Denis Johnson, from “Talking Richard Wilson Blues, by Richard Clay Wilson,” The Throne of the Third Heaven of the Nations Millennium General Assembly: Poems New and Collected (HarperCollins, 1995)
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You may never look at the “sport of kings” in quite the same way after you read Melissa del Bosque’s new true crime book Bloodlines: The True Story of a Drug Cartel, the FBI, and the Battle for a Horse-Racing Dynasty, in which a pair of rookie agents uncovered the involvement of Miguel Treviño, one of the leaders of the Zetas, Mexico’s most brutal drug cartel, in American horse-racing, in order to launder millions of dollars.

Robert M. Pirsig, who inspired generations to road trip across America with his “novelistic autobigraphy,” Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance, died Monday at the age of 88.

His publisher William Morrow & Company said in a statement that Pirsig died at his home in South Berwick, Maine, “after a period of failing health.”

Pirsig wrote just two books: Zen (subtitled “An Inquiry Into Values”) and Lila: An Inquiry into Morals.

‘Zen And The Art of Motorcycle Maintenance’ Author Robert M. Pirsig Dies At 88

Photo: William Morrow/HarperCollins

Curiosity House

My classmate lend me her book “Curiosity House” this weekend and MAAAAAN, I got hooked on it! But I have trouble finding any mutual, or artist who had shown interest on them, yet. I know you’re out there somewhere just react to this post because I’m trying to find its fandom.

It’s a book by the author Lauren Oliver and H.C. Chester. 

It’s aesthetic reminds me of A SERIES OF UNFORTUNATE EVENTS/PECULIAR CHILDREN. And I don’t know what else to say but I love the ““Big Four””. eeeeeepppp