anonymous asked:

Hi cunt women are lesser animals,with usually smaller brains, less neurons, and less synapses. That's why women rely more on instinct and emotion, rather than logic or reason. That also explains women's relative lack of intellectual accomplishments or invention over the past 3,000 years (and more). Your gender's main contributions have been singing, giving birth, cooking and cleaning, Nearly everything women have accomplished is with help from men or from a group of men. Women deserve no rights

Hi dickhead I’m feeling petty this morning so I’m gonna eviscerate this swill part by part. It seems like the concept of basic science confuses you. I’ll start by citing this article for you and provide some choice quotes. It used a heavily peer-reviewed study and the methodology was completely sound (i read the whole goddamn original work and several of its external citations).

“On average, for example, men tend to have a larger amygdala, a region associated with emotion. Such differences are small and highly influenced by the environment, yet they have still been used to paint a binary picture of the human brain,“

“Depending on whether the researchers looked at gray matter, white matter, or the diffusion tensor imaging data, between 23% and 53% of brains contained a mix of regions that fell on the male-end and female-end of the spectrum. Very few of the brains—between 0% and 8%—contained all male or all female structures.” 

A list of early inventions by women (it includes elevated rail-lines, Kevlar, and the submarine telescope! the lack of patents taken out by women early on is actually because men made it illegal for a woman to hold a patent in her name until the early 1900s. those darn men, always inhibiting progress)

 A detailed list of several well-known contemporary female scholars

Here’s Wikipedia’s list of Muslim women who made significant intellectual achievements

A list of 30 Black women who made history

A detailed history of Asian women’s contributions

Notable Native American women from the past 350 years

Here’s TWO articles on the contributions of trans women in contemporary culture (the first one also includes nonbinary people, just a heads up. It seemed more relevant than many of the others tho)

You know what fuck you here’s 50 more women who did important shit

Wikipedia’s history of lesbian literature (which lists a lot of books and authors)

Tbh I do agree with you on the singing being a main contribution, just because women have nicer voices (in my opinion) and are much more likely to use their songwriting expertise to push activist and progressive agendas.

Maybe don’t come into my inbox with this shit when you don’t know what you’re talking about? Put away the 18th century medical book and take a chill pill.

It was witches who developed an extensive understanding of bones and muscles, herbs and drugs, while physicians were still deriving their prognoses from astrology and alchemists were trying to turn lead into gold. So great was the witches’ knowledge that in 1527, Paracelsus, considered the ‘father of modern medicine,’ burned his text on pharmaceuticals, confessing that he 'had learned from the Sorceress all he knew.’
—  Barbara Ehrenreich and Deirdre English, Witches, Midwives, and Nurses - A History of Women Healers (1973)
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“My mother used to tell me, ‘You may be the first to do many things, but make sure you’re not the last.’ I feel a responsibility to show young women what’s possible and to mentor them to own their power and fulfill their promise.”

- Kamala Harris is California’s first female, African-American, and Asian-American Attorney General and is aiming to become the first African-American female senator in almost 20 years.

Check out the in-depth Q&A with Kamala below!

Keep reading

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Author John Scalzi was on a roll this morning (currently 7:14 AM, 26 Sept. 2014) with a tweet he found from some guy sending out an “ultimatum” to women to “make a choice” between feminism and, well, men like him. So Scalzi launched into a truly magnificent set of scorchers, which I’m posting here for the delectation of people everywhere.

Also: I would like to thank that guy for setting the ultimatum. It makes finding a boyfriend so much easier when the undesirable ones wear a placard identifying themselves.

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Queer Profile: Queen Kristina of Sweden

Born December 8, 1626 in Stockholm, Sweden, Queen Kristina inherited the throne at the age of six when her father died in battle. Being the only heir, her father instructed that she be educated as a prince. One of the first things she achieved during her reign, was putting an end to the Thirty Years’ War. Nicknamed Minerva of the North, after the Roman equivalent of the Greek god of wisdom, Kristina valued education and philosophy. She showed these values in her determination to improve the education of peasants. Thanks to her rule; Sweden first began to publish newspapers and the first school system was started. Advancements in science and the enjoyment of literature and the arts were fully supported by Queen Kristina. She carried one of the greatest collections of books, paintings, and sculptures. While Queen of Sweden, Kristina chose her own ladies-in-waiting and it is believed she had an affair with one of them, Countess Ebba Sparre, whom she nicknamed “Belle” (pictured bottom left). Their intimacy is proved through the many letters passed between them. Ebba Sparre was reportedly given the title of the queen’s “Bed Fellow.” Their relationship ended soon after Countess Sparre was married and left Kristina’s court, but their letters continued. Kristina also was believed to have had affairs with women by the names of Gabrielle de Rochechouart de Mortemart, Rachel Teixeira, and Angelina Giorgino, but she later reflected in her memoirs that Ebba was the only real love of her life. Despite the urging of her court for her to produce an heir to the throne, Queen Kristina refused to marry throughout her 10 year reign of Sweden. Instead she appointed her cousin Charles X Gustav to be her heir. She immediately abdicated the throne and moved to Rome, Italy following her baptism into Catholicism. In Rome, she founded the Arcadia Academy (Accademia dell’Arcadia) and urged that the first public house of opera, Tordinona, be opened.

The witch-hunts left a lasting effect: An aspect of the female has ever since been associated with the witch, and an aura of contamination has remained – especially around the midwife and other women healers.

This early and devastating exclusion of women from independent healing roles was a violent precedent and a warning: It was to become a theme of our history. The women’s health movement of today has ancient roots in the medieval covens, and its opponents have as their ancestors those who ruthlessly forced the elimination of witches.

—  Barbara Ehrenreich and Deirdre English, Witches, Midwives, and Nurses - A History of Women Healers (1973)