HENARES

6

Airport bars, thinks Roy, must be among the most depressing and soulless places on earth. The only reason he’s sitting in this one sipping on a ridiculously over-priced beer is that his brother Douglas is running late to pick him up, so he thought that while he was waiting he may as well do some work on his laptop. Bunty could not have picked a worse time to have her health crisis; Roy signed three highly sought-after young talents last week, including hot new 6′ 8″ basketballer Otieno Henare, and he should be spending his week brokering multi-million dollar sponsorship deals with high-powered execs instead of being stuck out here in the middle of nowhere surrounded by dribbling glassy-eyed yokels. But when he opens his laptop the first thing that greets him in his newsfeed is a smirking picture of Alex Deadshit Dunlop, with his greasy helmet of dyed-black hair and sallow skin, under a headline proclaiming him to be the new chairman of some wanky arts board which apparently is some big fucking deal because he’s responsible for a budget of over §500 million, §20 million of which he wants to immediately flush down the toilet under the guise of ‘fostering the talents of exciting new artists.’ 

Roy: Motherfucker. Fuckwitted, queef-eating cockhead-

Cowboy: The fuck did you just say?

Roy: Calm your tits, John Wayne. I wasn’t talking to you. 

Cowboy: You better watch your language, son.

Douglas: Roy? What the hell?

Ngata’s 1916 verses:
The first contingent was
from throughout New Zealand,
including the South Island;
they were from the four tides.

You there
the five hundred
the brave Battalion
of angry-eyed Tu.

Some of you have fallen in Egypt,
some in Gallipoli.
Love gnaws within us
and pain also.

The second echelon was
from around Gisborne,
from Tolaga Bay,
from the East Coast.

Farewell, O Henare,
and your ‘clump of rushes’
who fell while fighting
in France.

Who will survive there
to bring the story back
to all the people
in sorrow bowed?

Tomoana’s 1917 verse:
The ninth contingent
is from near Rotorua,
from near Gisborne,
and from Hawke’s Bay.

And now I am going
to the conflict of the Frenchmen
and there will I weep.
I salute you as I disappear
out of sight of the land.
Goodbye
my own true love.

— 

When the First World War broke out, Māori leaders responded in various ways. Some, such as Rua Kenana Hepetipa, maintained total opposition to Māori enlistment. Others such as Apirana Ngata, Paraire Tomoana, and Maui Pomare, were in favour of Māori enlistment and organised recruitment drives, particularly in the Waikato region of Ngāti Maniapoto and the East Coast Ngāti Porou region.

Their recruitment campaign was particularly successful in Ngāti Porou, which enlisted enough men to form its own company in the battalion. Some companies were also supplemented by recruits from the Cook Islands and Niue.

By 1916 the battalion was in desperate need of reinforcements. As part of the drive to recruit more soldiers, the song Te Ope Tuatahi was composed by Apirana Ngata. It became famous during the First World War and was adopted as the anthem of the battalion.

In 1917, again in need of reinforcements, Paraire Tomoana composed an additional verse to the song, specifically encouraging enlistment in Ngāti Kahungunu, and other eastern regions of the North Island.

Ngata’s 1916 verses:
Te ope tuatahi
No Aotearoa
No Te Waipounamu
No nga tai e wha

Ko koutou ena
E nga rau e rima
Te Hokowhitu toa
A Tumatauenga

I hinga ka Ihipa
Ki Karipori ra ia
E ngau nei te aroha
Me te mamae

Te ope tuarua
No Mahaki rawa
Na Hauiti koe
Na Porourangi

I haere ai Henare
Me to wiwi
I patu ki te pakanga
Ki Paranihi ra ia

Ko wai he morehu
Hei kawe korero
Ki te iwi nui e
E taukuri nei?

Tomoana’s 1917 verse:
Te ope tuaiwa
No Te Arawa
No Te Tairawhiti
No Kahungunu

E haere ana au
Ki runga o Wiwi
Ki reira au nei
E tangi ai

Me mihi kau atu
I te nuku o te whenua
He konei ra e
E te tau puma.

— 

When the First World War broke out, Māori leaders responded in various ways. Some, such as Rua Kenana Hepetipa, maintained total opposition to Māori enlistment. Others such as Apirana Ngata, Paraire Tomoana, and Maui Pomare, were in favour of Māori enlistment and organised recruitment drives, particularly in the Waikato region of Ngāti Maniapoto and the East Coast Ngāti Porou region. 

Their recruitment campaign was particularly successful in Ngāti Porou, which enlisted enough men to form its own company in the battalion. Some companies were also supplemented by recruits from the Cook Islands and Niue. 

By 1916 the battalion was in desperate need of reinforcements. As part of the drive to recruit more soldiers, the song Te Ope Tuatahi was composed by Apirana Ngata. It became famous during the First World War and was adopted as the anthem of the battalion. 

In 1917, again in need of reinforcements, Paraire Tomoana composed an additional verse to the song, specifically encouraging enlistment in Ngāti Kahungunu, and other eastern regions of the North Island.

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Barn Owl (Tyto albaby Máximo Henares Villoria

THIS DAY IN HISTORY:  December 16th, 1485- Queen Catherine of Aragon was born

Catherine was born at the Archbishop’s Palace in Alcalá de Henares near Madrid, on the night of 16 December 1485. She was the youngest surviving child of King Ferdinand II of Aragon and Queen Isabella I of Castile. Catherine was quite short in stature with long red hair, wide blue eyes, a round face, and a fair complexion.

Catherine was three years old when she was betrothed to Prince Arthur, heir apparent to the English throne. They married in 1501, but Arthur died five months later. In 1507, she held the position of ambassador for the Spanish Court in England, becoming the first female ambassador in European history. Catherine subsequently married Arthur’s younger brother, the recently succeeded Henry VIII, in 1509.