Greek-and-Roman-Mythology

The Sum of my Heart

read it on the AO3 at http://ift.tt/2h0qb7Z

by fishydwarrows

Victuuri-

there’s flowers, its gay:

“Death will snatch your child from their cradle. It will come into your house and cut your throat. Death is cunning and a cheat. Truly, the most evil of all the Gods.” Such words often clutched at Yuuri’s silent heart, cutting deep into his mind.

Hades and Persephone AU

Words: 2142, Chapters: 1/?, Language: English



read it on the AO3 at http://ift.tt/2h0qb7Z
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They’re all here! I took it upon myself to create an illustration of a Mythological creature or character for every letter of the alphabet, trying to span across a multitude of cultures and creature-types. Another thing I wanted to accomplish with this project was to find some the more unusual and/or obscure creatures that don’t get as much representation in artwork. Individual Tumblr Posts with said creatures’ descriptions are below.

Again, I’ll be making this into a small run of books as a way to test the waters. If there’s more demand for a larger run, I’ll definitely be looking into it!

All REBLOGS are appreciated! 

Bestiary Alphabetum: Each Entry is clickable!

A is for Ammit

B is for The Beast of Gevaudan

C is for Cockatrice

D is for Dullahan

E is for Eurynomos

F is for Faun

G is for Grendel

H is for Harpy

I is for Indus Worm

J is for Jersey Devil

K is for Krampus

L is for Lamassu

M is for Manticore

N is for Nuckelavee

O is for Otoroshi

P is for Penanggalan

Q if for Questing Beast

R is for Rangda

S is for Succubus

T is for Tzitzimitl

U is for Ushi-Oni

V is for Vegetable Lamb

W is for Wyvern

X is for Xing Tian

Y is for Yara-Ma-Yha-Who

Z is for Ziphius

Mythology Links

Everyone know’s that research is important. So here are some links for people looking into mythology.

Greek Mythology

Roman Mythology

Egyptian Mythology

Norse Mythology

European Mythology

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Asian Mythology

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African Mythology

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Middle Eastern Mythology

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Native American Mythology

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Meso-American Mythology

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Multiple Mythologies

Mythological Creatures

It’s 2035. 

Rick Riordan is releasing his 20th mythology-fiction series based on Percy’s previously undiscovered step sibling’s grandkids.

I’ll be there to push away any kids to pick up a copy, though. 

Every October.

Roman Amethyst Intaglio of a Girl Riding a Sea Monster, 1st Century BC/AD

This was possibly made by the master carver Dioscurides, who was the favorite gem carver of the Emperor Augustus.

It is possible that this intaglio portrays one of two possible subjects, the nymph Aura or a Nereid riding on a sea-bull, sea-goat or some other type of horned sea monster. A small seal swims in the ocean behind them.

The difference between Romans and Greeks
  • Camp Half Blood: Oh hi welcome to our lovely camp have a nice beaded necklace while we sing songs around the campfire
  • Camp Jupiter: You wanna be part of our camp? C'mere then you're goNNA GET BRANDED FOR LIFE
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mythology meme - one of six nymphs/muses: echo

Echo was a nymph whose power of speech was curtailed by Hera, so that she merely repeated the concluding phrases of a speech and returned the words she heard. Hera did this because Echo, holding the goddess in long talk, prevented her to catch the nymphs who had been in company with her husband.

She was educated by the nymphs, and taught to play music by the muses. In the original Greek myths, Echo fled from all males, whether men or gods, because she loved virginity. Seeing that, Pan took occasion to be angry at her, and to envy her music because he could not come at her beauty. Therefore he turned mad the shepherds and goatherds, and they, like dogs and wolves, tore her to pieces, and flung them about them all over the earth. Gaia then buried these pieces, preserving their musical property. And by a decree of the muses they breathe out a voice, imitating all things.

In Ovid’s version of her story Echo fell in love with Narcissus, who spurned her love, and so she, because of her grief, faded away with the exception of her voice. Echo, they say, disappeared from woods and mountains so completely that not even her bones remained, which were turned into stone. The others nymphs grieved Narcissus but, while preparing his funeral pyre, they could not find his body. In its place they found the flower, which still today bears his name.