Great-Seal

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Great seals of the three Kings: Richard II, Henry IV and Henry V

-Richard II of England - RICARDVS DEI GRACIA REX FRANCIE ET ANGLIE ET D[OMI]N[V]S HIBERNIE
Richard, by the grace of God, King of France and England and Lord of Ireland

-Henry IV of England - HENRICVS DEI GRACIA REX FRANCIE ET ANGLIE ET D[OMI]N[V]S HIBERNIE
Henry, by the grace of God, King of France and England and Lord of Ireland

-Henry V of England - HENRICVS DEI GRACIA REX FRANCIE ET ANGLIE ET D[OMI]N[V]S HIBERNIE / HENRICVS DEI GRACIA REX ANGLIE ET FRANCIE ET DOMINUS HIBERNIE 

Henry, by the grace of God, King of France and England and Lord of Ireland / Henry, by the grace of God, King of England and France and Lord of Ireland


Edward the Confessor, sometime before A.D. 1066, started using a “Great Seal” casting in wax of his own visage to signify that a document carried the force of his will. With some exceptions, each subsequent British monarch has chosen his or her own design for the Great Seal.

Images from: Luminarium.org

theblaze.com
Clinton on Security Failures in Benghazi: ‘It Was Not My Ball to Carry’
Former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton said in an interview with “60 Minutes” that she was not responsible for security failures leading up to the Sept. 11, 2012, attacks in Benghazi. When asked what responsibility she has for the Benghazi attacks, Clinton said she “took responsibly”...

“When this happened in Benghazi, I immediately stood up an independent committee – distinguished Americans, military and civilian experts,” she said. “They came out and they said, ‘You know, the ball was dropped – in security. And, you know, some of the decisions that were made, probably should have been rethought.’”

CBS’s Scott Pelley then interjected: “But wasn’t that your ball to carry?”

“No it wasn’t. It was not my ball to carry,” Clinton responded. “Read the reports, read all of the reports — all many hundreds of pages of them.”

No accountability.  This is a prelude to a Hillary Clinton presidency.  #neverhillary

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The Seal Burse of Queen Elizabeth I

England, around AD 1596

“This seal burse (purse) is embroidered with the Royal Arms of England for the Great Seal of Elizabeth I (reigned 1553-1603). The Great Seal was traditionally carried in procession before the Lord Chancellor and Keeper of the Seal in a burse, or purse, originally of white leather or linen. By the end of the sixteenth century the burse was transformed into a magnificent velvet purse, embroidered with the arms of England and elaborately decorated. This example shows the crowned royal cypher and the letters ‘ER’ (Elizabeth Regina) for Queen Elizabeth I, and a Tudor rose: the heraldic design is set within a scrolling foliate border. The shimmering surface of this burse, achieved by the use of gold threads and silver sequins, and the elaborate design, is a testament to the lavish display of the Elizabethan court.

The Great Seal of England is of the greatest importance, as it is attached to all major documents of state. It was part of the ‘perquisite’ or ‘perk’ of office that the Lord Chancellor and Keeper of the Great Seal was allowed to keep the old seal with its accompanying burse. Sir Thomas Egerton was appointed Keeper of the Great Seal on 6 May 1596; he gave this burse to his servant Henry Jones, whose family transformed it into a cushion cover. The strips at the side of the burse panel, decorated with wheat ears, were attached at this time. It is mentioned in the will of Henry’s widow, Elizabeth, in 1632: ‘a cushion of velvet embroidered with gold which was a seal purse.’”

Source: British Museum