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  • ACTION COMICS #40 inspired by BILL & TED’S EXCELLENT ADVENTURE, with cover art by Joe Quinones
  • AQUAMAN #40 inspired by FREE WILLY, with cover art by Richard Horie
  • BATGIRL #40 inspired by PURPLE RAIN, with cover art by Cliff Chiang
  • BATMAN #40 inspired by THE MASK, with cover art by Dave Johnson
  • BATMAN & ROBIN #40 inspired by HARRY POTTER, with cover art by Tommy Lee Edwards
  • BATMAN/SUPERMAN #20 inspired by THE FUGITIVE, with cover art by Tony Harris
  • CATWOMAN #40 inspired by BULLITT, with cover art by Dave Johnson
  • DETECTIVE COMICS #40 inspired by THE MATRIX, with cover art by Brian Stelfreeze
  • FLASH #40 inspired by NORTH BY NORTHWEST, with cover art by Bill Sienkiewicz
  • HARLEY QUINN #16 inspired by JAILHOUSE ROCK, with cover art by Dave Johnson
  • GRAYSON #8 inspired by ENTER THE DRAGON, with cover art by Bill Sienkiewicz
  • GREEN LANTERN #40 inspired by 2001: A SPACE ODYSSEY, with cover art by Tony Harris
  • GREEN LANTERN CORPS #40 inspired by FORBIDDEN PLANET, with cover cover art by Tony Harris
  • JUSTICE LEAGUE UNITED #10 inspired by MARS ATTACKS, with cover art by Marco D'Alphonso
  • JUSTICE LEAGUE #40 inspired by MAGIC MIKE, with cover art by Emanuela Lupacchino
  • JUSTICE LEAGUE DARK #40 inspired by BEETLEJUICE, with cover art by Joe Quinones
  • TEEN TITANS #8 inspired by THE LOST BOYS, with cover art by Alex Garner
  • SINESTRO #11 inspired by WESTWORLD, with cover art by Dave Johnson
  • SUPERGIRL #40 inspired by WIZARD OF OZ, with cover art by Marco D'Alphonso
  • SUPERMAN #40 inspired by SUPER FLY, with cover art by Dave Johnson
  • SUPERMAN/WONDER WOMAN #17 inspired cover by GONE WITH THE WIND, with art by Gene Ha
  • WONDER WOMAN #40 inspired by 300, with cover art by Bill Sienkiewicz

Oscar’s First Black Winner Accepted Her Honor in a Segregated ‘No Blacks’ Hotel in L.A.

“On a February afternoon in 1940, Hattie McDaniel — then one of the biggest African-American movie stars in the world — marched into the Culver City offices of producer David O. Selznick and placed a stack of Gone With the Wind reviews on his desk. The Civil War epic, released two months earlier, had become an instant cultural sensation, and McDaniel’s portrayal of Mammy — the head slave at Tara, the film’s fictional Southern plantation — was being singled out by both white and African-American critics as extraordinary. The Los Angeles Times even praised her work as "worthy of Academy supporting awards.” Selznick took the hint and submitted the 44-year-old for a nomination in the best supporting actress category, along with her co-star, Olivia de Havilland, contributing to the film’s record-setting 13 noms.“  

Read the full piece here