Ginko-Ogino

First female physican by country?

Making a complete list is surprisingly difficult, considering that this information is probably known locally.  Below is an incomplete and flawed list by country, updated December 2014.  Linked posts go to past Cool Chicks from History posts.

If you can add to the list, please use the answer function to write the woman’s name and country.  

Argentina: Cecilia Grierson

Australia: Emma Constance Stone

Austria: Gabriele Possanner

Brazil: Rita Lobato

Canada: Jennie Trout/Emily Stowe

Chile: Eloísa Díaz Insunza

China: Li Shuo (???)

Colombia: Anna Galvis Hotz

Cuba: Laura Martinez de Carvajal

Czech Republic: Anna Honzáková

Denmark: Nielsine Nielsen

Ecuador: Matilde Hidalgo de Procel 

Germany: Dorothea Erxleben

Hungary: Vilma Hugonnai

Finland: Rosina Heikel

France: Madeleine Brès, but pre-modern women such as Magistra Hersend also practiced medicine.

Ireland: Eleanora Fleury

Italy: Unknown, women qualified as physicians in the Middle Ages 12

India: Anandi Gopal Joshi, followed closely by Kadambini Ganguly

Japan: Ogino Ginko

Korea: Jang Geum 

Mexico: Matilde Montoya

Netherlands: Aletta Jacobs

New Zealand:  Emily Siedeberg/Margaret Cruickshank (Plus Rina Moore was the first Maori female physician) 

Nicaragua: Concepción Palacios Herrera

Nigeria: Elizabeth Abimbola Awoliyi

Norway: Marie Spångberg Holth

Peru: Laura Rodriguez Dulanto 

Philippines: Honoria Acosta-Sison

Poland: Anna Tomaszewicz-Dobrska

Portugal: Amélia dos Santos Costa Cardia

Romania: Maria Cuțarida-Crătunescu

Russia: Nadezhda Suslova

Singapore: Lee Choo Neo

Spain: Dolors Aleu Riera

Sweden: Lovisa Årberg

Switzerland: Marie Heim-Vögtlin

Turkey: Safiye Ali

UK: Elizabeth Garrett Anderson

USA: Elizabeth Blackwell

Venezuela: Lya Imber (European born) followed by Sara Bendahan (Venezuelan born)

First female doctor by country?

Making a complete list is surprisingly difficult, considering that this information is probably known locally.  Below is an incomplete list by country, updated October 2014.  

If you can add to the list, please use the answer function to write the woman’s name and country.  

Argentina: Cecilia Grierson

Australia: Emma Constance Stone

Austria: Gabriele Possanner

Brazil: Rita Lobato

Canada: Jennie Trout/Emily Stowe

Chile: Eloísa Díaz Insunza

Colombia: Anna Galvis Hotz

Denmark: Nielsine Nielsen

Ecuador: Matilde Hidalgo de Procel 

Germany: Dorothea Erxleben

Hungary: Vilma Hugonnai

Finland: Rosina Heikel

France: Madeleine Brès, but pre-modern women such as Magistra Hersend also practiced medicine.

Ireland: Eleanora Fleury

Italy: Unknown, women qualified as physicians in the Middle Ages 12

India: Anandi Gopal Joshi, followed closely by Kadambini Ganguly

Japan: Ogino Ginko

Korea: Jang Geum 

Mexico: Matilde Montoya

Netherlands: Aletta Jacobs

New Zealand:  Emily Siedeberg/Margaret Cruickshank (Plus Rina Moore was the first Maori female physician) 

Nicaragua: Concepción Palacios Herrera

Nigeria: Elizabeth Abimbola Awoliyi

Norway: Marie Spångberg Holth

Peru: Laura Rodriguez Dulanto 

Philippines: Honoria Acosta-Sison

Romania: Maria Cuțarida-Crătunescu

Russia: Nadezhda Suslova

Spain: Dolors Aleu Riera

Sweden: Lovisa Årberg

Turkey: Safiye Ali

UK: Elizabeth Garrett Anderson

USA: Elizabeth Blackwell

Venezuela: Lya Imber (European born) followed by Sara Bendahan (Venezuelan born)

Ogino Ginko (1851-1913)

Art by Martha Han (tumblr)

Ogino Ginko was Japan’s first female physician and her career was propelled by her own lackluster experiences as a patient.  Married at age 16, Ginko contracted gonorrhea from her husband.  Once she realized that she was infected, she sought and was granted a divorce but she felt stigmatized by the medical community as a patient with a sexually transmitted infection.  Believing that a female physician would have shown her greater compassion, Ginko resolved to become a physician herself.   She enrolled in a private all-male medical college (today Juntendo University) and graduated in 1882.  Despite her education, Ginko was initially barred from taking the examination that would qualify her as a physician.  She finally took and passed the exam in 1885.

After qualifying as a physician, Ginko opened an obgyn practice in Tokyo.  In 1890, she married for a second time.  The couple never had children as Ginko’s gonorrhea infection had left her infertile.