Gillo-Pontecorvo

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After my Mag+Art and Album+Art, Criterion+Art is the latest addition in my +Art digital collage series. This is inspired by one of my followers’ request to combine movie posters and classical paintings. But I tweaked the idea and used old and new Criterion covers instead. I love art house cinema, and I think this will be a good tribute.

AntiChrist by Lars Von Trier + Danae by Artemisia Gentileschi

In the Mood for Love by Wong Kar-Wai + Portrait of Mlle. L.L. (Young Lady in a Red Jacket) by James Tissot

The Last Temptation of Christ by Martin Scorsese + Portrait of Oswald Achenbach by Ludwig des Coudres

The Battle of Algiers by Gillo Pontecorvo + Creation of Adam by Michelangelo

Modern Times by Charlie Chaplin + The Son of Man by René Magritte

L'Avventura by Michelangelo Antonioni + The Proposal by Frederick Morgan

Days of Heaven by Terrence Malick + Christina’s World by Andrew Wyeth

Le Bonheur by Agnes Varda + Sunflowers by Vincent van Gogh

The Marriage of Maria Braun by Rainer Werner Fassbinder + Girl with Cherries by Giovanni Ambrogio de Predis

Pierrot Le Fou by Jean-Luc Godard + Feeding the pigeons by Antonio Ermolao Paoletti

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You know, Ali, it’s hard enough to start a revolution, even harder to sustain it, and hardest of all to win it. But it’s only afterwards, once we’ve won, that the real difficulties begin.

The Battle of Algiers (1966) Gillo Pontecorvo

One of the most influential political films in history, The Battle of Algiers, by Gillo Pontecorvo, vividly re-creates a key year in the tumultuous Algerian struggle for independence from the occupying French in the 1950s. As violence escalates on both sides, children shoot soldiers at point-blank range, women plant bombs in cafés, and French soldiers resort to torture to break the will of the insurgents. Shot on the streets of Algiers in documentary style, the film is a case study in modern warfare, with its terrorist attacks and the brutal techniques used to combat them. Pontecorvo’s tour de force has astonishing relevance today. - from back cover

via The Battle of Algiers (1965, dir. Gillo Pontecorvo)

“Challenged by terrorist tactics and guerrilla warfare in Iraq, the Pentagon recently held a screening of The Battle of Algiers, the film that in the late 1960’s was required viewing and something of a teaching tool for radicalized Americans and revolutionary wannabes opposing the Vietnam War.

Back in those days the young audiences that often sat through several showings of Gillo Pontecorvo’s 1965 re-enactment of the urban struggle between French troops and Algerian nationalists, shared the director’s sympathies for the guerrillas of the F.L.N., Algeria’s National Liberation Front.

The Pentagon’s showing drew a more professionally detached audience of about 40 officers and civilian experts who were urged to consider and discuss the implicit issues at the core of the film — the problematic but alluring efficacy of brutal and repressive means in fighting clandestine terrorists in places like Algeria and Iraq. Or more specifically, the advantages and costs of resorting to torture and intimidation in seeking vital human intelligence about enemy plans.

As the flier inviting guests to the Pentagon screening declared: ‘How to win a battle against terrorism and lose the war of ideas. Children shoot soldiers at point-blank range. Women plant bombs in cafes. Soon the entire Arab population builds to a mad fervor. Sound familiar? The French have a plan. It succeeds tactically, but fails strategically. To understand why, come to a rare showing of this film.’”

-“What Does the Pentagon See in Battle of Algiers?”, The New York Times (via) (photo via)