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8 Jan 1969: Today’s Georgevid about I, Me, Mine is accompanied by part of the ‘painful’ Let it Be Session transcript. 

Aside from George’s Anthology-era comments, the video above shows George playing the song to an enthusiastic Ringo, as they had both arrived early that day. They are later joined by Paul at a brief session, before a disheartened George shelved the song for a year. 

The two sessions were interspersed by the following interaction with John when George tried to present the song to him - and the exchange below gives some insight into the unsupportive hostility George was experiencing when he walked out just two days later. That the song was about the destructive egos in the band just adds a touch of irony to the situation.                     

John: We can use it for a commercial. [laughs, clearly bored and preoccupied] So, yeah. It’s fine. And what do we do about that?

George: Um, well, it’s just a bit…you see…

John: It sounds so hard to do.

George: No, it’s… no.

John: I mean, for you.

George: No.

John [falsetto]: ‘I me mine…’ You know, all that singing.

George [Plays Again]: All through the day, I me mine, I me mine, I me mine… All through the night, I me mine, I me mine, I me mine… No one’s frightened of leaving it, everyone’s weaving it, coming on strong all the time…

John [Mocking Opera]: I me my me my me my me my oh…

George [Forcefully]: All I can hear… I me mine – I me mine – I me mine…

John: All the girls can come on and dance it. Hare’s and fish-wives, and dwarves, and hunchbacks…

George [Even more forcefully]: Even your tears, I me mine, I me mine, I me mine… No one’s frightened of playing it, everyone’s saying it, flowing more freely than wine…

John [Condescendingly laughing]: Run along, son. See you later. We’re a rock ‘n’ roll band, you know.

[George Harrison] could play like nobody else because he had his own style of playing. I don’t think George would say he was as meticulous and fluent as Eric [Clapton]. He always bowed to Eric as far as a technician. But for versatility and ideas, George was far superior. George was more creative, more melodic. Eric was a better player, more blues-oriented, and George asked Eric to play a lot of the solos on the All Things Must Pass album and sit in the control room with me while Eric played them. But on the commercial recordings like ‘My Sweet Lord’, George played those, and worked on them for endless hours, getting the harmonies right, because that’s what made The Beatles’ records, those solos. They were so commercial and so technically perfect. That was George’s gift. George was one of the most commercial musicians and songwriters and quintessential players I’ve ever known in my entire career.
—  Phil Spector, Living in the Material World