Francis-Thompson

Summer set lip to earth’s bosom bare,
And left the flush’d print in a poppy there;
Like a yawn of fire from the grass it came,
And the fanning wind puff’d it to flapping flame.

With burnt mouth red like a lion’s it drank
The blood of the sun as he slaughter’d sank,
And dipp’d its cup in the purpurate shine
When the eastern conduits ran with wine.

From the poem ‘The Poppy’, by Francis Thompson

Photo: Sunrise, Dorset Poppies by Mike Boss.

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Three panels from “The Hound of Heaven: A Pictorial Sequence” painted by R.H. Ives Gammell, (1956). Inspired by Francis Thompson’s poem The Hound of Heaven, (1893).

Unlike the artists of the Boston School, Gammell’s art dealt with the profoundest of human concerns—mankind’s constant preoccupation with the enigma of its condition and position in the cosmos, and with the mystery of the relation of our mind and imagination to powers and forces beyond us. This work most personally expressed his own visionary experience and represented twenty years of actual work and over forty years of contemplation.

Francis Thompson, the English poet, was an opium addict who became homeless on the streets of London and was taken care of by prostitutes. His poem describes how the grace of God in Jesus Christ came into his life; how God sought him out in his sin and misery. J.R.R. Tolkien, author of the Lord of the Rings said this about the poem:

“The name is strange (The Hound of Heaven.) It startles one at first. It is so bold, so new, so fearless. It does not attract, rather the reverse. But when one reads the poem this strangeness disappears. The meaning is understood. As the hound follows the hare, never ceasing in its running, ever drawing nearer in the chase, with unhurrying and steady pace, so does God follow the fleeing soul by his divine grace. And though in sin or in human love, away from God it seeks to hide itself, divine grace follows after, unwearyingly follows ever after, till the soul feels its pressure forcing it to return to him alone in that never ending pursuit.”

The 23 paintings themselves can be seen at the Maryhill Museum of Art, Goldendale, WA, USA or in Gammell’s book

New Poems. Francis Thompson. London: Archibald Constable & Co., 1897.

“For, wild Penelope, the web you wove
You still unweave, unloving all your love;
Is this to love me,
Or what rights have I that scorn could deny?
Even of your love, alas, poor Love must die,
If so you love me!”

Robert Hale Ives Gammell (1893-1981)

Hound of Heaven (detail)

“The Hound of Heaven: A Pictorial Sequence” painted by R.H. Ives Gammell, (1956) was inspired by Francis Thompson’s poem The Hound of Heaven, (1893).

Unlike the artists of the Boston School, Gammell’s art dealt with the profoundest of human concerns—mankind’s constant preoccupation with the enigma of its condition and position in the cosmos, and with the mystery of the relation of our mind and imagination to powers and forces beyond us. This work most personally expressed his own visionary experience and represented twenty years of actual work and over forty years of contemplation.

Francis Thompson, the English poet, was an opium addict who became homeless on the streets of London and was taken care of by prostitutes. His poem describes how the grace of God in Jesus Christ came into his life; how God sought him out in his sin and misery. J.R.R. Tolkien, author of the Lord of the Rings said this about the poem:

“The name is strange (The Hound of Heaven.) It startles one at first. It is so bold, so new, so fearless. It does not attract, rather the reverse. But when one reads the poem this strangeness disappears. The meaning is understood. As the hound follows the hare, never ceasing in its running, ever drawing nearer in the chase, with unhurrying and steady pace, so does God follow the fleeing soul by his divine grace. And though in sin or in human love, away from God it seeks to hide itself, divine grace follows after, unwearyingly follows ever after, till the soul feels its pressure forcing it to return to him alone in that never ending pursuit.”

The 23 paintings themselves can be seen at the Maryhill Museum of Art, Goldendale, WA, USA or in Gammell’s book. 

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Sky Children - I’m Not In Love (Official Music Video)


Köszönjük Szabó György Armand és a HOD presentsnek a szuper videót. Forrása az a kisfilm, ami a lemezborítójának elkészítéséhez is ihletet adott.
Details of the video: NY NY the day in New York, Francis Thompson 1957, shot in 16 mm format

Sky Children:
János Bien (Yell) – vocal
Ágoston Reiner – guitar, bass, synth
Special guest:
Jázmin Bien (Jazzy) - vocal

I’m Not In Love (original by 10cc /// Eric Stewart & Graham Gouldman)

Recorded by Sky Children 2015
Mastered by Roxx Hydi in JERICHO SOUNDZ.
e-mail: roxxhydi69@gmail.com / tel : +44 79 120 316 93

A kislemez a HOD presents gondozásában látott napvilágot 2015-ben.

https://hodpresents.bandcamp.com/album/im-not-in-love-maxi

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THE HOUND OF HEAVEN

Listen to Richard Burton read Francis Thompson‘s The Hound of Heaven.”

You can follow the text of the poem here
http://poetry.elcore.net/HoundOfHeavenInRtTGlossed.html