Fort Houston

Dear Mr. President

Mr. President how do you feel about the women’s march in
Birmingham
Mentone
Anchorage
Bethel
Cordova
Fairbanks
Gustavus
Haines
Homer
Juneau
Ketchikan
Kodiak
Kotzebue
Nome
Palmer
Seldovia
Sitka
Skagway
Soldotna
Valdez
Ajo
Flagstaff
Gold Canyon
Green Valley
Jerome
Phoenix
Prescott
Sedona
Tucson
Yuma
Bentonville
Fayetteville
Little Rock
Albany

Berkeley

Beverly Hills
Bishop
Borrego Springs
Carmel
Chico
Compton
Eureka
Fort Bragg
Fresno
Gualala
Hemet
June Lake
Kings Beach
Laguna Beach
Lompoc
Los Angeles
Modesto
Mt. Shasta
Napa
Oakhurst
Oakland
Pacifica
Palmdale
Pasadena
Perris
Redding
Redondo Beach
Ridgecrest
Riverside
Sacramento
San Clemente
San Diego
San Francisco
San Jose
San Leandro
San Luis Obispo
San Marcos
Santa Ana
Santa Barbara
Santa Cruz
Santa Rosa
Seaside
Sonoma
Ukiah
Ventura
Visalia
Walnut Creek

Alamosa
Aspen
Carbondale
Cedaredge
Colorado Springs
Cortez
Denver
Glenwood Springs
Grand Junction
Ridgway
Salida
Steamboat Springs
Telluride

East Haddam
Hartford
Old Saybrook
Salisbury
Stamford

Newark

Daytona Beach
Fernandina Beach
Gainesville
Jacksonville
Key West
Miami
Miami Beach
Naples
New Smyrna Beach
Ocala
Orlando
Panama City
Pensacola
Saint Petersburg
Sarasota
Sarasota
St. Augustine
Tallahassee
West Palm Beach

Atlanta
Augusta
Statesboro
Zebu

Hagåtña

Hilo
Honolulu
Kahului
Kauai
Kawaihae
Kona
Lihue

Boise
Driggs
Idaho Falls
Ketchum
Moscow
Pocatello
Sandpoint
Stanley

Carbondale
Champaign
Chicago
Galesburg
Maryville
Peoria
Rockford
Springfield

Fort Wayne
Indianapolis
Lafayette
Paoli
Saint Mary-of-the-Woods
South Bend

Decorah
Des Moines
Dubuque
Iowa City

Topeka
Wichita

Lexington
Louisville
Murray

Lafayette
New Orleans
Shreveport

Augusta
Brunswick
Eastport
Kennebunk
Portland
Sanford
Surry
Vinalhaven
Annapolis
Baltimore
Baltimore
Frederick
Ocean City
Boston
Falmouth
Greenfield
Nantucket
Northampton
Pittsfield
Pittsfield
Provincetown
Adrian
Ann Arbor
Brighton
Clare
Detroit
Douglas
Grand Rapids
Grosse Pointe
Houghton
Kalamazoo
Lansing
Marquette
Merrill
Midland
Traverse City

Bemidji
Duluth
Longville
Morris
Rochester
St. Paul
Gulfport
Hattiesburg
Jackson
Oxford

Columbia
Kansas City
Springfield
St. Louis

Helena
Miles City

Lincoln
Loup City
Omaha

Las Vegas
Reno
Stateline

Concord
Francestown
Jackson
Keene
Lancaster
Portsmouth
Portsmouth
Wilton

Asbury Park
Pompton Plains
Sicklerville
Trenton
Westfield
Wyckoff

Albuquerque
Deming
Fort Sumner
Las Cruces
Santa Fe
Truth or Consequences

Albany
Binghamton
Buffalo
Cobleskill
Cooperstown
Delhi
Fredonia
Glens Falls
Hudson
Ithaca
Lewis
New York
Oneonta
Port Jefferson Station
Port Jervis
Poughkeepsie
Rochester
Sag Harbor
Seneca Falls
Syracuse
Utica
Utica
Watertown
Woodstock

Asheville
Black Mountain
Burnsville
Charlotte
Greensboro
Hillsborough
Mooresville
Morganton
New Bern
New Bern
Raleigh
West Jefferson
Wilmington
Winston-Salem

Bismarck
Fargo
Grand Forks

Chillicothe
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Dayton
Lakeside
Toledo
Troy
Wooster

Oklahoma City

Ashland
Astoria
Bend
Brookings
Coos Bay
Elkton
Eugene
Florence
Halfway
Joseph
La Grande
McMinnville
Newport
Pendleton
Portland
Salem
Salem
Sandy
Tillamook
Welches

Beaver
Doylestown
Erie
Harrisburg
Indiana
Lancaster
Lewisburg
Philadelphia
Pittsburgh
Reading
Selinsgrove
Sharon

Mayaguez
San Juan
Santurce
Vieques

Providence

Charleston
Clemson
Columbia
Greenville

Pierre
Rapid City
Sioux Falls
Vermillion

Chattanooga
Jonesborough
Knoxville
Knoxville
Memphis
Murfreesboro
Nashville
Nashville
Oak Ridge

Abilene
Alpine
Amarillo
Austin
Beaumont
Brownsville
Corpus Christi, Texas
Dallas
Denton
Eagle Pass
El Paso
Fort Worth
Houston
Lubbock
Marfa
Nacogdoches
San Antonio
Wichita Falls

Bluff
Kanab
Moab
Ogden
Park City
Salt Lake City
St George

Killington
Montpelier

Arlington
Charlottesville
Norfolk
Norfolk
Roanoke
St. John
Williamsburg
Winchester
Woodstock

Anacortes
Bainbridge Island
Bellingham
Chelan
Eastsound
Ephrata
Friday Harbor
Kingston
Langley
Longview
Mount Vernon
Olympia
Port Townsend
Richland
Seattle
Spokane
Twisp
Union
Walla Walla
Wenatchee
Yakima

Charleston

Bayfield
Eau Claire
Madison
Menomonie
Milwaukee
Minocqua
Plymouth
Sheboygan

Casper
Cheyenne
Cody
Jackson
Lander
Laramie
Pinedale

London

Amsterdam
Melbourne

Paris

Berlin

Mexico City

Auckland

Washington D.C. On your front door

And many, many more

2.6 million people took part in 673 marches in all 50 states and 32 countries, from Belarus to New Zealand.

Dear Mr. President,

Welcome to the revolution, you are not welcome here.

anonymous asked:

Hi there! I'm hoping to write a story about a woman combat medic, and have multiple questions. I know this is a combat position, and women were only recently accepted to those, so where would she most likely be stationed? Would she spend more time in battles or in hospitals? Are combat medics (68Ws?) more likely to develop PTSD? What are more common positions for women? How easy is it for combat medics, once they leave the military, to become EMTs? Are there any common misconceptions? Thanks!

I always want to provide the best answers here that I can, so I’m thrilled to announce the first guest post of @ginger-wuv​, a fantastic female medic who’s graciously agreed to tackle this ask. This is some grade A stuff, so I hope you all enjoy and give Doc Rain some kudos if you like it! -Kingsley

Keep reading

Hello, I’m Gone

Status: Complete
Word Count: 5.4K   
Category: One-shot; Behind-the-scenes canon-compliant; Baby/The Impala; Life choices; Personal growth
Rating: Teen & Up
Character(s): References to familiar people/places
Pairing(s): N/A
Warnings: Bit o’ sassy language of the four-letter variety, if you’re of a pearl-clutching nature
Author’s Note(s): Post-story
Overall Summary:Chuck told us a story about Baby’s early days. And we know how she’s spent most of her life helping the Winchesters get to where they need to go. Here’s a little of what happened in between.

Hello, I’m Gone

The Lucchese brothers set out for America from Italy, climbed off a boat in Galveston, Texas in 1882. Enterprising fellows as they were, Sal and Joe already had a nice little thing going, a boot-making shop out at Fort Houston, over in San Antonio, by 1883. Sal was a nut for machinery, really turned his crank - any word he got about something that might rev things up, well, he wanted to be the first to try it.  

The Luccheses became known for their hands-on approach, helped by those machines, sure, but only so’s they could give their work a boost. And they refused to cut corners, not even a little. The brothers believed that you should do things right, didn’t matter how busy you got.

Right around the turn of the century, their boots were coming in at around ten bucks. By the early parts of the 1900s, they were around $40 a pop. Then came the Hollywood bandwagon, handfuls of actors showing up wearing the Italian-meets-Western creations as word spread - back in that day, couldn’t just turn on a TV or expect to see ‘em plastered on billboards. Word of mouth and reputation go a hell of a long way.

The singer-songwriters and actual cowboy-types came along. And in the 60s, when style was starting to take a left turn, those boots were still hanging around. Hell, even the White House got in on the action - I’d heard some of the Kennedys got measured and fitted. Johnson, too.

Which, you should. I did. It wasn’t cheap, but worth it. You plan to surround yourself with something, day in and day out, you best make sure it’s a good fit. So I dished out some of the precious savings I’d squirreled away and got two good fits. Just in case I needed to walk. 

And I would’ve walked, all the way, if I’d had to. I had 'em for a year, good and broken-in, those dark cherry-red dreams that came almost to my knees. Short legs, short strides, but I was determined.

They’d turned into what I thought were the most important boots - maybe the most important things - in the world. They kept me going, just needed to glance down at them, like they were a talisman. If I believed in that sort of thing. 

Still. Funny how things can do that for you, and the people around you can’t. Won’t.

I’d been planning over that year of boot-breaking. To get out. Get gone. Away from that shithole outside Dallas, out of Texas completely. The boots set me back, my waitressing tips and the cash from hocking what little jewelry Momma’d had never quite plugging the hole. Especially when lots of it kept disappearing from my purse, went to his beer and liquor. And his girls on the side.

I stole his piece of garbage truck. I had the spare key, made sense with all the driving I did in it, picking him up from the bars when they’d announced everybody didn’t have to go home, but they couldn’t… well, you know the rest. And sometimes he wouldn’t head home and I’d find him wandering back from a cheap motel along the potholed road that led to the house. His house. His TV. His food. His furniture. His guns. 

Stole one of those, too.

The world had sailed into the 70s while I was sailing nowhere. I had nothing to my name but some clothes, my picture of Momma and Daddy the day they got hitched, and my boots. Only brought what I couldn’t do without. A small start, but I figured it was better than nothing.  

I still lacked a surefire way to get me where I wanted to go. Wherever that was. Figured I’d know once I got there. I knew the boots would be loyal long as they could, but they weren’t gonna take me all the way. I wasn’t sure what could. 

I got a feeling that would change when I spotted that big black dream, parked all lonely in somebody’s yard. A handwritten “FOR SALE BY OWNER” sign was taped inside the back window. It was dirty as all get-out, had a crack in the passenger side window, a bent fender, and one of the back tires needed air in a bad way. 

Keep reading

List of abortion clinics in Texas:

Austin:

Austin Women’s Health Center

512-443-2888

Planned Parenthood-Austin

512-276-8000

——————–

Dallas:

Planned Parenthood- Dallas

214-373-1868

Southwestern Women’s Surgery Center

214-742-9310 

———————–

Fort Worth:

Whole Woman’s Health of Fort Worth

800-778-2444/ 817-924-6641 

Planned Parenthood-Fort Worth

817-276-8063

————————

Houston:

Houston Women’s Clinic

713-868-4483

Texas Ambulatory Surgical Center

713-272-6900 

Suburban Women’s Clinic

713-222-9832

Planned Parenthood- Center for Choice and Ambulatory Surgical Center

713-535-2400

—————————-

McAllen:

Whole Woman’s Health

956-686-2137

————————-

San Antonio:

Alamo Women’s Reproductive Services

210-816-2307


——————————

For Financial Assistance: 

Nat. Abortion Federation: 1-800-772-9100 

Planned Parenthood: 1-800-230-7526

 Lilith Fund: 1-877-659-4304 ( for areas south of Waco, panhandle, and east and west tx.)

Texas Equal Access Fund: 1-888-854–4852 (dfw, Waco, panhandle, east and west tx.)

West Fund: 915-213-4535 (English) 915-213-4578 (Spanish) (for el paso and surrounding areas)

La Frontera Fund: 956-508-3329. (for the rgv and surrounding areas)

Make sure to ask your clinic if they have any discounts or “hardship” prices if you are unable to afford your procedure.

For Transportation and Lodging:

Fund Texas Choice: 512-900-8908/ 1-844-900-8908

Clinic Access Support Network: 281-947-2276 (Houston only)

The Bridge Collective: 512-524-9822 (Austin area only) 

FOR JUDICIAL BYPASS INFORMATION CALL:

1-866-999-5263

2

Before Jeffrey Dahmer joined the army, he was trained at Fort Sam Houston. Linda Swisher, his former teacher, claimed that “he was extremely anti-social. He could have been a serial rapist.” During one of his tests, Dahmer was tasked to extract a fake liver from a resuscitation dummy. Swisher recalled him eerily smiling and noticed an “icy stare” in his eyes while he was doing so. Once Dahmer was shipped off to West Germany to join the US army, many peculiar things were reported to have occurred, the most significant one being the disappearance of a German named Hans. Hans had been drinking with Dahmer, and was later found 30 miles from the base with his intestines pulled out. The man’s murder bore a striking resemblance to the killer’s future murders. Dahmer’s roommates also recalled him returning to the base covered in blood multiple times. 

#TeamRayon

Which U.S. Cities Have The Longest Working Weeks?

Wondering how long your week is really going to be?  Indeed, the battle to top the list of cities with the longest working week is a hard-fought one. Overall, the average working week for large American cities works out at 42.4 hours and this increases to 46.5 when commuting is included.

8

Hofheinz Pavilion Houston Texas 24 November 1974

“I have no idea who wants to see me, which cities to play or which not to play, I just have a lot of concepts, which I wanna get rid of, and which I’m getting rid of, like one, when I went to Dallas or Houston, Texas on the old Beatle tours, I remember both years, one year, first year, we went to Dallas and we almost got killed. Second year, we went to Houston, we almost got killed. So my concept of Texas has been ‘wherever, wherever I go, I’m not going to Texas, because they’re all mad, you know, but I just remembered what happened there, and so I played, where was it, Fort Worth? And Houston.

And it’s amazing the change, you know that’s what amazes me the change in the entire 6 years of people’s consciousness. It;s incredible, I mean it’s like, say four years ago, five years ago, in San Francisco and Los Angeles. it’s like that now in Texas. The feeling of the people and the way they look and the way they act. It’s great! You know, it was one of the really nicest shows. The shows at Fort Worth were really nice & Houston, I really (dug) just, I didn’t have any of that old fear I thought I may have.“ - George on conquering old fears from back when he and The Beatles toured Texas and replacing them with great memories, from a (presumably) 20 December 1974 interview while in his hotel room in NYC with  KHJ 930 AM Radio, Los Angeles