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MC: Stop teasing him or I’ll smack you

Taemin thinks his dad’s gift for MC is better than the one he made ((he doesn’t know that Jumin actually wrote “From Taemin” on the bouquet tag hhahhaha dorks))

Years later Taemin was able to make better Strawberry Pancakes than Jumin LOL ((++MC probably bought both the “#1 Dad” Mug and “#1 Son” Shirt)

//Late sketchhh! Let’s pretend I uploaded this yesterday hheheh/

Please don’t repost any MM family AU stuff anywhere (including IG)

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These white cooks bragged about stealing recipes from Mexico to start a Portland business

  • There’s a long simmering conversation in the food world about cultural appropriation — about who’s allowed to cook what, and why — but it’s usually a tad more subtle than what Kali Wilgus and Liz “LC” Connelly confessed to Willamette Week in Portland, Oregon.
  • Wilgus and Connelly were profiled by Willamette Week about the delicious handmade tortillas they sell out of a food truck called Kooks Burritos on Cesar Chavez Boulevard in Portland. The duo said they learned their craft from women in Puerto Nuevo, Mexico.
  • “I picked the brains of every tortilla lady there in the worst broken Spanish ever, and they showed me a little of what they did,” Connelly told Willamette Week. “They told us the basic ingredients, and we saw them moving and stretching the dough similar to how pizza makers do before rolling it out with rolling pins. They wouldn’t tell us too much about technique, but we were peeking into the windows of every kitchen, totally fascinated by how easy they made it look. We learned quickly it isn’t quite that easy.”
  • The problem, of course, is that it’s unclear whether the Mexican women who handed over their recipes ever got anything in return. And now those same recipes are being sold as a delicacy in Portland.  Read more (5/19/17)

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Quintessa Pavilions in Napa Valley

Situated on a ridgeline within the breathtaking 280-acre Quintessa Estate in Napa Valley, the Quintessa Pavilions designed by Walker Warner Architects exemplify the ideal fusion of architecture and nature. Immersed in the landscape and surrounded by vineyard-covered hills, each pavilion is carefully sited to protect visitors from the elements while preserving the surrounding oak trees that naturally shade the area. Built with sustainability in mind, the overall design echoes the existing winery in its environmental sensitivity and industrial material palette that ages and weathers elegantly. The result is three, unique wine tasting pavilions that can be utilized year-round despite the weather.

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