Fibonacci

The Golden Ratio and Secret Geometry in Nature

These wonderfully symmetrical plants show the fractal nature of math, physics and the universe. Could this be evidence of sacred geometry? “Look deep into nature, and then you will understand everything better.” -Albert Einstein

The Golden Ratio, or Fibonacci sequence, is everywhere. It can be found in ancient architecture, in some of the world’s most beloved artwork (such as the Mona Lisa), and most definitely in nature. It’s for this reason that the intriguing sequence, which begins as 0, 1, 1, 2, 3, 5, 8, 13, 21, 34, 55 and so on forever, has fascinated mathematicians, scientists, designers, and artists for centuries. 

Leonardo DaVinci, for instance, was known to use the Fibonacci sequence in his masterpieces because the pattern is aesthetically pleasing. Is it a coincidence that the ratio can be seen from a micro to macro scale in all biological systems, and even in inanimate objects? Clearly, there’s much to learn about sacred geometry and inherent order in the universe. 

 Some theorize that the phi ratio (phi = 1.61803…) is evidence that nature is inherently perfect, and that when mankind strays away from the natural law, sickness and imbalance occur. While the Golden Ratio doesn’t account for every structure or pattern in this world and others, it most certainly is a key player.

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isometrica_minerals Halite with Tolbachite with natural Fibonacci spiral growth habit from the Sieroszowice Mine, Lubin, Legnica, lower Silesia, Poland. This remarkable piece was the only one from this pieces I saw from this production with this unusual spiral characteristic. Definitely drew awe from me. 

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Geometry at work: Orbital Resonance, Sound and Water

Richard Proctor, Old and New Astronomy, 1892

What men recognized then in the movements of the heavenly bodies is true now and true for all time. And even in dealing with the limited knowledge and the imperfect methods of ancient astronomers, we need not hesitate to consider these movements as they are now recognized and understood.

Ernst Chladni, Die Akustic, 1802

Nodal lines of vibrating circular or polygonal  plates, according to Chladni and Savart.The breakthrough work acquired a status of foundational work of a new scientific field and earned him a title of “father of acoustics”. It was the first systematic description of the vibrations of elastic bodies.

Snowflake Man

Wilson Alwyn “Snowflake” Bentley (February 7, 1865 – December 23, 1931), is one of the first known photographers of snowflakes. He perfected a process of catching flakes on black velvet in such a way that their images could be captured before they either melted or sublimated.