Federal-Application-For-Student-Aid

f is for financial aid

today’s post is dedicated to financial aid, the internal revenue service and all of the money that makes dreams like the creative circus come true. 

I would estimate that 364 days out of the year I don’t really care about money. now don’t get me wrong, I understand the importance of money in helping me live the life I choose … and the value of a dollar, and all that good stuff … but it’s just not a motivator, for me, professionally or creatively. however, yesterday was not one of those 364 days. (and it’s a leap year, so I’ll likely get one more).

it’s painful to reach a point in your dreaming when you realize your dreams have outgrown what is (seemingly) financially possible. I say seemingly because true dreamers (and creative dreamers) see obstacles as mere challenges they’ve yet to overcome. I would never let money stand in the way of a better future for myself. I’ve got too much to do.

enter: FAFSA.

I’m no stranger to the financial aid process or the 31 fire-y hoops you have to jump through to be awarded financial aid … it’s just that, well, we haven’t been acquainted for quite some time. I forgot FAFSA’s tedious and detailed ways, the bastard.

as I sat on the phone yesterday for what seemed like an eternity (but was only 45 minutes) waiting to speak to a warm-blooded human at the IRS, I wished that I could just grow a money tree, or win the lottery. it would make things so much easier. 

maybe no one is really wealthy, or really poor. maybe we’re all just dreamers who have the money or the gusto to pursue our dreams. or not. I guess I would fall under the “dreamer with gusto” category … and for today, that will have to do.

Where to Find Cosmetology Scholarships

Making the decision to enroll in a cosmetology school can be both exciting and a bit overwhelming. Just like any post-secondary school, there may be significant costs associated with getting your degree or certification. At minimum, you’ll need to cover your tuition and exam fees, supplies, and living expenses. But, where do you find the money to finance these costs when you’re on a limited budget?

Keep reading

Pell Grants | 2015 Online Pell Grant Eligibility And Application Guide

Pell grants are given to financially weak undergraduate students in US. This grant is available to students of bachelor’s degree or some skill based training program. Since, students are not required to repay this grant; it is very useful for them. It can help them pay for their college fees and other expenses required for pursuing the program.

If you to want Pell Grant. then it is necessary to fill its application form very carefully. This will increase your chances of getting this grant. To get the application form, you can visit the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) website. The deadline for filling the application form is June 30, 2015.

Tips To Fill The Application Form

As this grant is offered on first come first basis, you should submit your application form as early as possible. You can also fill and submit the form online to save time. For filling the form online, you have to register on the FAFSA website to obtain the PIN (Personal Identification Number). Parents of dependent students should also apply for the PIN. The applications that are submitted online are processed earlier than those received by post. Simultaneously student should also start early in applying for other free sources of funding like scholarships. Scholarship Options is a good starting point.

Keep All Documents At Hand

You should keep all the documents that you have to submit along with thePell grant application form, at hand. This will help you in completing the application process early. The documents that are required are –

• Driving License

• Social Security Number

• W-2 forms

• Bank statements

• Investments and debts statements

• Parents’ income tax returns (for dependent students)

• Self income tax returns (for independent students)

• Spouse income tax returns (if married)

Some other documents may also be required depending on the kind of program you are pursuing and other special conditions, if any.

File Your Taxes

You must file your taxes early, as you have to give the tax information in your Pell grant application form. This will help you in filling and submitting the form early. If filing the taxes early is not possible, you should keep ready the estimate for the same so that you can fill the application form. You can show the income tax returns later.

Read The Instructions

You should carefully read the instructions for filling up the application form. This will ensure that you fill your form correctly. You should check whether you fall in the category of dependent or independent student. A little carelessness can waste all your efforts.

Fill the worksheet and then the application form

The web worksheet allows you to see and answer all the questions before filling the form on the website. Once you have filled the worksheet, you can copy the data to the website. You are required to give your personal and family information. You have to answer few questions on your aspirations.

If you keep the above tips in mind, you will be able to successfully fill your Pell grant application form.

To apply for Pell Grant. you will need to fill up and submit the FAFSA (Free Application for Federal Student Aid) form.

There Are Three Ways In Which You Can Apply For FAFSA. You Can –

1. Call the FAFSA Student Aid Centre and ask them to mail a FAFSA form to your address. You can then complete the form and mail it to the concerned address.

2. Download the FAFSA form from the website, complete it and send it by mail to the given address.

3. Complete and submit the form, online.

The third option is the fastest and the most convenient. Even the federal student aid authorities encourage online submission of applications.

To apply for Pell Grant online, you would have to visit the website www.fafsa.ed.gov. The website has three sections “Before Beginning a FAFSA ”, “Filling Out a FAFSA”, and “FAFSA Follow-up”. These sections provide instructions to the students to guide them through the process of application.

The first section “Before Beginning a FAFSA” provides tips to fill the FAFSA form accurately and quickly. On going through the section you will get an idea of –

• How to complete the FAFSA,

• How the financial aid given to a student is computed,

• The eligibility criteria,

• Deadlines for submitting the form,

• Details of the documents required, and

• How to generate a pin to sign your FAFSA form electronically

You will find a link for printing the FAFSA on the web Worksheet. It is advisable to take a printout of this worksheet, as it will give you an idea of how the FAFSA form is structured. You can gather the required details and fill it in the worksheet. This makes it easier to transfer the data to the FAFSA on the web.

In the next section, “Filling Out a FAFSA”, you can actually begin to fill up your form. If you have any doubts regarding a specific question you can either click the “Need Help” button or get help from a customer representative by clicking on the “Live Help” link. If you are unable to complete the application in one sitting you can always save it and resume later. Students who want to make corrections to a processed application can also do so in this section.

Once you have filled the form you will be required to sign it electronically through a PIN (Personal Identification Number). Your parents too will be required to sign with a PIN if you are a dependent. If you or your parents do not already have a PIN, you can apply for one and get it immediately. After you have signed and submitted the application, it will get processed. On an average, the processing time would be 2-3 weeks. Thereafter your Student Aid Report will be sent to you by the Federal Student Aid.

In the last section “FAFSA Follow-up”, you can check the status of your application. You can also see or print your Student Aid Report. Corrections to the processed application can also be made through a link in this section.

Though applying for the Pell Grant online is the most convenient, you should remember to do it well before the deadline. This would ensure that you do not enter wrong details in haste. This year Pell Grant Application deadline is on June 30, 2015.

With online Pell Grant application students should also simultaneously search and apply for other free sources of funding like scholarships. Scholarships options guide is a good tool in finding these.

In the present times, the cost of education is on the rise. On an average the cost of a private college is $20,000 per annum. Even the cost of education at a public university or college averages around $10,000 per annum. Thus students who belong to the lower income families find it difficult to pursue higher education. Statistics reveal that only about ½ the students from families with low income are able to earn a college degree. With a view to encourage the continuation of education, the Federal Government introduced the Pell Grant.

The Pell Grant is a need-based financial aid for students who belong to lower income families. The Federal Government earmarks certain funds for this grant each year. The quantum of funds varies from year to year. The grants are disbursed to the eligible students from this fund. However, there are certain criteria that one must meet in order to be eligible for the grant.

The criteria for Pell Grant Eligibility are discussed below.

Financial status: The U.S. Department of Education discerns if the student needs financial help by using a formula. This formula takes into account various factors and results in a figure (the Expected Family Contribution or EFC). This number helps to decide whether the student is eligible for the Pell grant. The factors which are used to arrive at the EFC are

o The student’s income and assets (if the student is independent)

o The income and assets of the parents (if the student is independent)

o The size of the family

o The number of family members pursuing post secondary education

Citizenship: The student must be a U.S citizen or an eligible non-citizen. An eligible non-citizen is a person who fulfills any one of the following conditions

a) Is a U.S. permanent resident with an Alien Registration Card (I-551),

b) Is a conditional permanent resident with an I-551C card or

c) Has an Arrival Departure Record (I-94) from the Immigration and Naturalization Service (INS). The designation in the Record must be that of refugee, asylum granted, parole or Cuban-Haitian entrant.

Course of study: The students should be pursuing their undergraduate studies. They should not have obtained a bachelor’s degree or a professional degree. Students pursing post-baccalaureate teacher certification programs are also eligible to apply for the Pell Grant.

Institutions: There are approximately 5400 post secondary institutions taking part in the process. The student must be enrolled in one of these institutions.

Registration with Selective Service: A male student must be registered with the selective service. Alternatively he must sign a statement of registration signifying that he need not register.

Educational criterion: The student must have earned a high school diploma or a GED.

The student should not already be receiving the Pell Grant. However he can be eligible for two grants if he is planning to undertake additional courses within that year to speed up his studies.

The Pell Grant is unlike a student loan because one is not required to pay it back. It has already helped millions of financially weak students in the pursuance of their studies.

Like student loans, Pell Grants are a very popular means of financing studies.

The student financial aid known as Pell Grant is one of the best things that may happen to the life of students who want to finish college and their parents who are trying and working hard to send their kids to school. This school year, the deadline for application and disbursement schedule for Pell Grant 2015-2015 is still a subject of wonder. Educational institutions have never revealed a deadline or an ideal time to pass Pell Grant applications, leaving students and their parents almost clueless. Some colleges would set different schedules. Typically, the first day of February, March and April are given as the deadline. But one thing that most parents do not know is that there is actually an ideal date to pass the application.

But first, let us discuss what a Pell Grant is. This is a form of student financial aid that took its name from US Senator Claiborne Pell. This grant program was originally called as the Basic Educational Opportunity Program. However, the Pell Grant is not a loan. Since it is a grant, it does not have to be repaid. It is simply awarded to those who need the financial aid the most. For a student to apply for a Pell Grant, he or she must apply through FAFSA or Free Application for Federal Student Aid. The amount granted to the student is determined by the calculations based on the information given by the student upon filling up the FAFSA form and passing a copy of the family s EFC or Expected Family Contribution.

Usually, parents think that the earliest possible date to pass their EFC for their child s Pell Grant application is February 1st. However, they are mistaken. This date may sound early, but it is actually a little late already. The ideal date to pass the application for a Pell Grant is on the 1st day of January or any nearest day possible to it. Since there are a lot of students and parents rooting to get a grant, then the earliest you could pass the application requirements, the better. Today, not only families from the lower class apply for a financial aid, but also those from the middle class. This just proves how hard it is to send a child to school. So, parents and students must always be on their toes and pass their applications for the Pell Grant at the earliest day possible.

Submitting early may secure a bigger chance of receiving a Pell Grant and getting the right disbursement according to what is due depending on the calculation of your EFC. There are cases where parents pay higher tuition than they should because of shortage in aids. Meanwhile, parents should not be worried about giving a wrong calculation. Just try to calculate what you think is the most accurate figures. Do not exaggerate the numbers.

Disbursement schedules vary from college to college. Pell grant disbursements are often given per season, in batches. Those who were successful in their 2015-2015 application can get their Spring disbursements sometime in March to June 2015.

A college degree is needed to have a competitive edge in the workplace these days. However, getting a diploma is not that easy, paying for higher education is undoubtedly expensive. In order to make schooling accessible to everyone, there are now various grants and scholarships offered by different institutions. The government itself has taken steps to be able to support the educational ambitions of individuals by providing the Pell Grant.

Because those who are awarded the Pell Grant do not need to repay the money spent on their education, there are strict rules that dictate who the people eligible for this are. The Pell Grant requirements are the factors that prospective students need to satisfy in order to qualify for this.

There are several Pell Grant requirements that a person will need to fulfill in order to be given this.

Financial Need

The most important qualifier is that the individual will need to establish his or her financial need. The Pell Grant is specifically designed for people who have problems with their finances, so it stands to reason why this is the factor that they pay the most attention to. The level of need of the student will be measured by the expected family contribution (EFC). Those who have an EFC below the cut-off point become eligible for being given a Pell Grant provided they satisfy all the other requirements. In general, the awards are given to students whose family incomes are below $20,000, although there have been cases of those who have an EFC of up to $45,000 have been given financial support.

Dependency Status

A person s dependency status can also affect his or her level of financial need. For example, a person who has applied as an independent will be looked at differently compared to the one who has applied as a dependent. Since independents do not rely on anyone but themselves for financial support, they will need to prove their financial standing by showing statements of account and such.

Schooling Status

Another criterion for the Pell Grant is for the applicant to have a high school diploma, a GED, or show that he or she has the ability to benefit from the program or training course. Individuals who can also prove that they went through a qualified homeschooling curriculum can also become eligible as long as they meet the other requirements.

The next criterion of the Pell Grant would be in terms of citizenship. The prospective student must be a United States citizen, a permanent citizen, or otherwise fit the eligible categories of a non-citizen by showing that he or she is able to live and attend school legally in the United States. The individual will need to present any of the following documents:

  • US Permanent Citizen (Alien Registration Card or I-551)
  • Conditional Permanent Citizen (I-551C)
  • Cuban-Haitian entrant with an Arrival Departure Record (I-94) from the Immigration and Naturalization Service (INS)

Otherwise, the prospective student has to show that he or she is a refugee, an asylum grantee, or a parolee.

Academic Progress

The prospective student must also show satisfactory academic progress. To prove this, the person must have at least a C (or 2.0) grade point average by the end of the second year if the degree is longer than two years, or prove the equivalent for shorter courses.

Other Pell Grant requirements include the student presenting his or her valid social security number. For males between 18-25 years old, they need to register with a selective service. The student will also need to finish filing the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FIFSA) that will show that he or she can use the federal student aid funds solely for educational purposes and that he or she is not in default of any federal student loan and/or do not owe a repayment of any federal student aid grant.

Meeting these Pell Grant requirements should put you on the right path to getting your college education supported by the government.

The Pell Grant is an educational grant given to college students in the US. To qualify for a Pell Grant, the family income of the student must be at most $60,000. It is designed to help low-income families to send their children to college by subsidizing the schools Cost of Attendance or COA.

What Determines Pell Grant Amount ?

Many people are asking whether the Pell Grant is the same for all States. You might be thinking that transferring to a different State will affect the Pell Grant amount you will receive, possibly making it larger. The fact is that the place or State in you reside in has NO BEARING on the amount of Pell Grant you will receive, if you are deemed eligible. The average Pell Grant amount paid to qualifying applicants is $2,250, but this ranges from a minimum $550, to a maximum of $5300, depending on the need of the family. A number of factors determine the Pell Grant amount given to a student, and the State or place of residence does not affect it. Family size, income, number of dependents, family assets, and the cost of the schools education are the factors that affect Pell Grant amount.

The Cost of Attendance also includes miscellaneous fees like supplies, food, boarding or dormitory expenses, computers, and software that are directly related to education. Pell Grant covers these expenses on top of tuition fees, books, transportation, and daily allowance.

How to Apply for Pell Grant

The Pell Grant is available to undergraduate students who have difficulty financing college tuition and cost of schooling. To apply for a Pell Grant, visit the website of Free Application for Federal Student Aid or FAFSA. The results of your application in FAFSA will determine the Pell Grant amount you can be entitled to using. Visit their website at fafsa.ed.gov to begin your application.

Can One Redeem Excess Pell Grant?

Yes. Normally, the Federal Government disburses Pell Grant Money to accredited Institutions who then either give the money to deserving applicants, or deposit the money to the students school account. If your Pell Grant was disbursed directly to your school, you may still claim the excess Pell Grant. Ask for a Pell Grant Refund Check from your school treasury or school registrar before term ends, otherwise, you will have difficulty claiming the excess money immediately. The school may keep the excess Pell Grant amount to be used for the succeeding semesters you have in school. However, if you are a graduating student and still have excess Pell Grant, the school will normally issue a check to you or mail your refund check to your home.

The Pell Grant is a government subsidy and may cover school terms of one or two semesters, but not necessarily a whole school year. The Federal Government awards the grants to the most deserving applicants; keeping an acceptable GPA is a necessary requirement to keep availing of the Pell Grant, just like most scholarship grants.

The Federal Pell Grant Program is one of the largest in the United States. It provides financial aid to thousands of college students every year. In 2009 official changes of the program were announced. The maximum grant is now larger and more students can participate in the program. Another major change is that eligible students can now receive a Pell Grant for summer college courses. This amendment is valid from summer 2010 onwards.

You can now receive a Pell Grant optional disbursement of $2,675 if you take courses in the summer term. Previously, it was possible for students to get this type of funding, only if they had not received the grant for the spring or fall semester. Now you can use the entire amount you are awarded with during the academic year (the fall and spring semesters) and receive funding for taking summer courses as well.

The amount of the Pell Grant you receive for the summer is determined on the basis of a range of factors including the number of classes you take. Still, the application process is the same. You have to fill in the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) and mark that you will need financial aid for the summer term.

Given that the change was introduced in late 2009 some students might have not included this request in the FAFSA for summer 2010. If this is applicable to you, you need to contact your financial aid’s office for help. Most schools do not require you to change your FAFSA. Students are usually asked to complete a separate form from the school to get the funding. Keep in mind, however, that this is a special measure for summer 2010 only.

There is another important aspect that you should take into account. In order to get a Pell Grant for the standard academic year, you are not obliged to meet any academic criteria. This is not the case with the summer Pell Grant, however. In order to be eligible for this scholarship, you have to meet a number of requirements.

You must have completed 24 credit hours in total throughout the academic year (the fall and spring semester). In addition, you must have received passing grades (or higher). The third eligibility criterion requires you to have at least 6 credit hours of classes during the summer. This means that you have to be on a half-time summer program, at least. As said earlier, the number of credit hours will determine the amount of Pell Grant money you get, as usually. This rule is not amended.

The changes in the Federal Pell Grant Program are more than beneficial. You can readily get financial aid for your summer courses. It is a good idea for you to fill in your FAFSA form as early as possible in order to secure the money you need. In addition, it takes some time for schools to adjust to the changes in the Federal aid programs. For this reason, you should keep an eye on the announcements regarding the summer Pell Grant coming from the financial aid office of your school.

Update April 12, 2011: Due to recent changes proposed to Federal Budget of 2011, additional Pell Grant for Summer College courses might no longer be available. Students are recommend to look for alternative options to fund there summer courses.


http://ift.tt/1AoLdUP

Pell Grants | 2015 Online Pell Grant Eligibility And Application Guide

Pell grants are given to financially weak undergraduate students in US. This grant is available to students of bachelor’s degree or some skill based training program. Since, students are not required to repay this grant; it is very useful for them. It can help them pay for their college fees and other expenses required for pursuing the program.

If you to want Pell Grant. then it is necessary to fill its application form very carefully. This will increase your chances of getting this grant. To get the application form, you can visit the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) website. The deadline for filling the application form is June 30, 2015.

Tips To Fill The Application Form

As this grant is offered on first come first basis, you should submit your application form as early as possible. You can also fill and submit the form online to save time. For filling the form online, you have to register on the FAFSA website to obtain the PIN (Personal Identification Number). Parents of dependent students should also apply for the PIN. The applications that are submitted online are processed earlier than those received by post. Simultaneously student should also start early in applying for other free sources of funding like scholarships. Scholarship Options is a good starting point.

Keep All Documents At Hand

You should keep all the documents that you have to submit along with thePell grant application form, at hand. This will help you in completing the application process early. The documents that are required are –

• Driving License

• Social Security Number

• W-2 forms

• Bank statements

• Investments and debts statements

• Parents’ income tax returns (for dependent students)

• Self income tax returns (for independent students)

• Spouse income tax returns (if married)

Some other documents may also be required depending on the kind of program you are pursuing and other special conditions, if any.

File Your Taxes

You must file your taxes early, as you have to give the tax information in your Pell grant application form. This will help you in filling and submitting the form early. If filing the taxes early is not possible, you should keep ready the estimate for the same so that you can fill the application form. You can show the income tax returns later.

Read The Instructions

You should carefully read the instructions for filling up the application form. This will ensure that you fill your form correctly. You should check whether you fall in the category of dependent or independent student. A little carelessness can waste all your efforts.

Fill the worksheet and then the application form

The web worksheet allows you to see and answer all the questions before filling the form on the website. Once you have filled the worksheet, you can copy the data to the website. You are required to give your personal and family information. You have to answer few questions on your aspirations.

If you keep the above tips in mind, you will be able to successfully fill your Pell grant application form.

To apply for Pell Grant. you will need to fill up and submit the FAFSA (Free Application for Federal Student Aid) form.

There Are Three Ways In Which You Can Apply For FAFSA. You Can –

1. Call the FAFSA Student Aid Centre and ask them to mail a FAFSA form to your address. You can then complete the form and mail it to the concerned address.

2. Download the FAFSA form from the website, complete it and send it by mail to the given address.

3. Complete and submit the form, online.

The third option is the fastest and the most convenient. Even the federal student aid authorities encourage online submission of applications.

To apply for Pell Grant online, you would have to visit the website www.fafsa.ed.gov. The website has three sections “Before Beginning a FAFSA ”, “Filling Out a FAFSA”, and “FAFSA Follow-up”. These sections provide instructions to the students to guide them through the process of application.

The first section “Before Beginning a FAFSA” provides tips to fill the FAFSA form accurately and quickly. On going through the section you will get an idea of –

• How to complete the FAFSA,

• How the financial aid given to a student is computed,

• The eligibility criteria,

• Deadlines for submitting the form,

• Details of the documents required, and

• How to generate a pin to sign your FAFSA form electronically

You will find a link for printing the FAFSA on the web Worksheet. It is advisable to take a printout of this worksheet, as it will give you an idea of how the FAFSA form is structured. You can gather the required details and fill it in the worksheet. This makes it easier to transfer the data to the FAFSA on the web.

In the next section, “Filling Out a FAFSA”, you can actually begin to fill up your form. If you have any doubts regarding a specific question you can either click the “Need Help” button or get help from a customer representative by clicking on the “Live Help” link. If you are unable to complete the application in one sitting you can always save it and resume later. Students who want to make corrections to a processed application can also do so in this section.

Once you have filled the form you will be required to sign it electronically through a PIN (Personal Identification Number). Your parents too will be required to sign with a PIN if you are a dependent. If you or your parents do not already have a PIN, you can apply for one and get it immediately. After you have signed and submitted the application, it will get processed. On an average, the processing time would be 2-3 weeks. Thereafter your Student Aid Report will be sent to you by the Federal Student Aid.

In the last section “FAFSA Follow-up”, you can check the status of your application. You can also see or print your Student Aid Report. Corrections to the processed application can also be made through a link in this section.

Though applying for the Pell Grant online is the most convenient, you should remember to do it well before the deadline. This would ensure that you do not enter wrong details in haste. This year Pell Grant Application deadline is on June 30, 2015.

With online Pell Grant application students should also simultaneously search and apply for other free sources of funding like scholarships. Scholarships options guide is a good tool in finding these.

In the present times, the cost of education is on the rise. On an average the cost of a private college is $20,000 per annum. Even the cost of education at a public university or college averages around $10,000 per annum. Thus students who belong to the lower income families find it difficult to pursue higher education. Statistics reveal that only about ½ the students from families with low income are able to earn a college degree. With a view to encourage the continuation of education, the Federal Government introduced the Pell Grant.

The Pell Grant is a need-based financial aid for students who belong to lower income families. The Federal Government earmarks certain funds for this grant each year. The quantum of funds varies from year to year. The grants are disbursed to the eligible students from this fund. However, there are certain criteria that one must meet in order to be eligible for the grant.

The criteria for Pell Grant Eligibility are discussed below.

Financial status: The U.S. Department of Education discerns if the student needs financial help by using a formula. This formula takes into account various factors and results in a figure (the Expected Family Contribution or EFC). This number helps to decide whether the student is eligible for the Pell grant. The factors which are used to arrive at the EFC are

o The student’s income and assets (if the student is independent)

o The income and assets of the parents (if the student is independent)

o The size of the family

o The number of family members pursuing post secondary education

Citizenship: The student must be a U.S citizen or an eligible non-citizen. An eligible non-citizen is a person who fulfills any one of the following conditions

a) Is a U.S. permanent resident with an Alien Registration Card (I-551),

b) Is a conditional permanent resident with an I-551C card or

c) Has an Arrival Departure Record (I-94) from the Immigration and Naturalization Service (INS). The designation in the Record must be that of refugee, asylum granted, parole or Cuban-Haitian entrant.

Course of study: The students should be pursuing their undergraduate studies. They should not have obtained a bachelor’s degree or a professional degree. Students pursing post-baccalaureate teacher certification programs are also eligible to apply for the Pell Grant.

Institutions: There are approximately 5400 post secondary institutions taking part in the process. The student must be enrolled in one of these institutions.

Registration with Selective Service: A male student must be registered with the selective service. Alternatively he must sign a statement of registration signifying that he need not register.

Educational criterion: The student must have earned a high school diploma or a GED.

The student should not already be receiving the Pell Grant. However he can be eligible for two grants if he is planning to undertake additional courses within that year to speed up his studies.

The Pell Grant is unlike a student loan because one is not required to pay it back. It has already helped millions of financially weak students in the pursuance of their studies.

Like student loans, Pell Grants are a very popular means of financing studies.

The student financial aid known as Pell Grant is one of the best things that may happen to the life of students who want to finish college and their parents who are trying and working hard to send their kids to school. This school year, the deadline for application and disbursement schedule for Pell Grant 2015-2015 is still a subject of wonder. Educational institutions have never revealed a deadline or an ideal time to pass Pell Grant applications, leaving students and their parents almost clueless. Some colleges would set different schedules. Typically, the first day of February, March and April are given as the deadline. But one thing that most parents do not know is that there is actually an ideal date to pass the application.

But first, let us discuss what a Pell Grant is. This is a form of student financial aid that took its name from US Senator Claiborne Pell. This grant program was originally called as the Basic Educational Opportunity Program. However, the Pell Grant is not a loan. Since it is a grant, it does not have to be repaid. It is simply awarded to those who need the financial aid the most. For a student to apply for a Pell Grant, he or she must apply through FAFSA or Free Application for Federal Student Aid. The amount granted to the student is determined by the calculations based on the information given by the student upon filling up the FAFSA form and passing a copy of the family s EFC or Expected Family Contribution.

Usually, parents think that the earliest possible date to pass their EFC for their child s Pell Grant application is February 1st. However, they are mistaken. This date may sound early, but it is actually a little late already. The ideal date to pass the application for a Pell Grant is on the 1st day of January or any nearest day possible to it. Since there are a lot of students and parents rooting to get a grant, then the earliest you could pass the application requirements, the better. Today, not only families from the lower class apply for a financial aid, but also those from the middle class. This just proves how hard it is to send a child to school. So, parents and students must always be on their toes and pass their applications for the Pell Grant at the earliest day possible.

Submitting early may secure a bigger chance of receiving a Pell Grant and getting the right disbursement according to what is due depending on the calculation of your EFC. There are cases where parents pay higher tuition than they should because of shortage in aids. Meanwhile, parents should not be worried about giving a wrong calculation. Just try to calculate what you think is the most accurate figures. Do not exaggerate the numbers.

Disbursement schedules vary from college to college. Pell grant disbursements are often given per season, in batches. Those who were successful in their 2015-2015 application can get their Spring disbursements sometime in March to June 2015.

A college degree is needed to have a competitive edge in the workplace these days. However, getting a diploma is not that easy, paying for higher education is undoubtedly expensive. In order to make schooling accessible to everyone, there are now various grants and scholarships offered by different institutions. The government itself has taken steps to be able to support the educational ambitions of individuals by providing the Pell Grant.

Because those who are awarded the Pell Grant do not need to repay the money spent on their education, there are strict rules that dictate who the people eligible for this are. The Pell Grant requirements are the factors that prospective students need to satisfy in order to qualify for this.

There are several Pell Grant requirements that a person will need to fulfill in order to be given this.

Financial Need

The most important qualifier is that the individual will need to establish his or her financial need. The Pell Grant is specifically designed for people who have problems with their finances, so it stands to reason why this is the factor that they pay the most attention to. The level of need of the student will be measured by the expected family contribution (EFC). Those who have an EFC below the cut-off point become eligible for being given a Pell Grant provided they satisfy all the other requirements. In general, the awards are given to students whose family incomes are below $20,000, although there have been cases of those who have an EFC of up to $45,000 have been given financial support.

Dependency Status

A person s dependency status can also affect his or her level of financial need. For example, a person who has applied as an independent will be looked at differently compared to the one who has applied as a dependent. Since independents do not rely on anyone but themselves for financial support, they will need to prove their financial standing by showing statements of account and such.

Schooling Status

Another criterion for the Pell Grant is for the applicant to have a high school diploma, a GED, or show that he or she has the ability to benefit from the program or training course. Individuals who can also prove that they went through a qualified homeschooling curriculum can also become eligible as long as they meet the other requirements.

The next criterion of the Pell Grant would be in terms of citizenship. The prospective student must be a United States citizen, a permanent citizen, or otherwise fit the eligible categories of a non-citizen by showing that he or she is able to live and attend school legally in the United States. The individual will need to present any of the following documents:

  • US Permanent Citizen (Alien Registration Card or I-551)
  • Conditional Permanent Citizen (I-551C)
  • Cuban-Haitian entrant with an Arrival Departure Record (I-94) from the Immigration and Naturalization Service (INS)

Otherwise, the prospective student has to show that he or she is a refugee, an asylum grantee, or a parolee.

Academic Progress

The prospective student must also show satisfactory academic progress. To prove this, the person must have at least a C (or 2.0) grade point average by the end of the second year if the degree is longer than two years, or prove the equivalent for shorter courses.

Other Pell Grant requirements include the student presenting his or her valid social security number. For males between 18-25 years old, they need to register with a selective service. The student will also need to finish filing the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FIFSA) that will show that he or she can use the federal student aid funds solely for educational purposes and that he or she is not in default of any federal student loan and/or do not owe a repayment of any federal student aid grant.

Meeting these Pell Grant requirements should put you on the right path to getting your college education supported by the government.

The Pell Grant is an educational grant given to college students in the US. To qualify for a Pell Grant, the family income of the student must be at most $60,000. It is designed to help low-income families to send their children to college by subsidizing the schools Cost of Attendance or COA.

What Determines Pell Grant Amount ?

Many people are asking whether the Pell Grant is the same for all States. You might be thinking that transferring to a different State will affect the Pell Grant amount you will receive, possibly making it larger. The fact is that the place or State in you reside in has NO BEARING on the amount of Pell Grant you will receive, if you are deemed eligible. The average Pell Grant amount paid to qualifying applicants is $2,250, but this ranges from a minimum $550, to a maximum of $5300, depending on the need of the family. A number of factors determine the Pell Grant amount given to a student, and the State or place of residence does not affect it. Family size, income, number of dependents, family assets, and the cost of the schools education are the factors that affect Pell Grant amount.

The Cost of Attendance also includes miscellaneous fees like supplies, food, boarding or dormitory expenses, computers, and software that are directly related to education. Pell Grant covers these expenses on top of tuition fees, books, transportation, and daily allowance.

How to Apply for Pell Grant

The Pell Grant is available to undergraduate students who have difficulty financing college tuition and cost of schooling. To apply for a Pell Grant, visit the website of Free Application for Federal Student Aid or FAFSA. The results of your application in FAFSA will determine the Pell Grant amount you can be entitled to using. Visit their website at fafsa.ed.gov to begin your application.

Can One Redeem Excess Pell Grant?

Yes. Normally, the Federal Government disburses Pell Grant Money to accredited Institutions who then either give the money to deserving applicants, or deposit the money to the students school account. If your Pell Grant was disbursed directly to your school, you may still claim the excess Pell Grant. Ask for a Pell Grant Refund Check from your school treasury or school registrar before term ends, otherwise, you will have difficulty claiming the excess money immediately. The school may keep the excess Pell Grant amount to be used for the succeeding semesters you have in school. However, if you are a graduating student and still have excess Pell Grant, the school will normally issue a check to you or mail your refund check to your home.

The Pell Grant is a government subsidy and may cover school terms of one or two semesters, but not necessarily a whole school year. The Federal Government awards the grants to the most deserving applicants; keeping an acceptable GPA is a necessary requirement to keep availing of the Pell Grant, just like most scholarship grants.

The Federal Pell Grant Program is one of the largest in the United States. It provides financial aid to thousands of college students every year. In 2009 official changes of the program were announced. The maximum grant is now larger and more students can participate in the program. Another major change is that eligible students can now receive a Pell Grant for summer college courses. This amendment is valid from summer 2010 onwards.

You can now receive a Pell Grant optional disbursement of $2,675 if you take courses in the summer term. Previously, it was possible for students to get this type of funding, only if they had not received the grant for the spring or fall semester. Now you can use the entire amount you are awarded with during the academic year (the fall and spring semesters) and receive funding for taking summer courses as well.

The amount of the Pell Grant you receive for the summer is determined on the basis of a range of factors including the number of classes you take. Still, the application process is the same. You have to fill in the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) and mark that you will need financial aid for the summer term.

Given that the change was introduced in late 2009 some students might have not included this request in the FAFSA for summer 2010. If this is applicable to you, you need to contact your financial aid’s office for help. Most schools do not require you to change your FAFSA. Students are usually asked to complete a separate form from the school to get the funding. Keep in mind, however, that this is a special measure for summer 2010 only.

There is another important aspect that you should take into account. In order to get a Pell Grant for the standard academic year, you are not obliged to meet any academic criteria. This is not the case with the summer Pell Grant, however. In order to be eligible for this scholarship, you have to meet a number of requirements.

You must have completed 24 credit hours in total throughout the academic year (the fall and spring semester). In addition, you must have received passing grades (or higher). The third eligibility criterion requires you to have at least 6 credit hours of classes during the summer. This means that you have to be on a half-time summer program, at least. As said earlier, the number of credit hours will determine the amount of Pell Grant money you get, as usually. This rule is not amended.

The changes in the Federal Pell Grant Program are more than beneficial. You can readily get financial aid for your summer courses. It is a good idea for you to fill in your FAFSA form as early as possible in order to secure the money you need. In addition, it takes some time for schools to adjust to the changes in the Federal aid programs. For this reason, you should keep an eye on the announcements regarding the summer Pell Grant coming from the financial aid office of your school.

Update April 12, 2011: Due to recent changes proposed to Federal Budget of 2011, additional Pell Grant for Summer College courses might no longer be available. Students are recommend to look for alternative options to fund there summer courses.


http://loan.remmont.com/news/pell_grants_124_2015_online_pell_grant_eligibility_and_application_guide/2015-05-22-1967


Getting a college education is undoubtedly expensive, with the nation’s top private universities having an average tuition of $200,000 for four years. Skyrocketing tuition, however, won’t stop students from pursuing their dreams and building their careers because they can seek financial aid to get through college. This financial aid package comes in the form of the Free Application for Federal Student Aid, or the FAFSA. With the help of FAFSA, families of college-bound kids can get financial aid to help them in getting quality education. Most parents will want to know how to get the best financial aid packages, but are daunted by the seemingly complicated process of applying for it. Contrary to popular belief, filing for FAFSA doesn’t need to be complicated, and you can even get more free money for college if you’re able to follow these tips in getting a better deal.

I have heard some student athletes were misguided in the belief that no scholarship was offered so they can’t go to school, Don’t let old Wewoka get you down…MAKE THEM SPEND TAX DOLLARS ON YOUR EDUCATION. APPLY FOR FINANCIAL AID…ALL HIGH SCHOOL GRADS AND GED RECIPIENTS ARE ELIGIBLE FOR A FREE EDUCATION!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!…IF YOU DON’T LIKE THIS SHAME ON YOU!!!!!!!!!!!

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New Post has been published on http://evidencebaseddentistry.de/2015/05/14/what-is-the-purpose-of-the-fafsa-application/

What is the Purpose of the FAFSA Application?

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FAFSA stands for the Free Application for Federal Student Aid. This is the governmental form that determines how much need you have. Take this form seriously because it could determine whether you can afford the college of your dreams or not.

To fill out the document, you will need to have your income taxes for the past year. If you are a dependent student – that is, if someone else can claim you on their taxes – you will need to submit their tax information as well.

Once you submit the FAFSA, the government will do a calculation as to how much your family can afford to pay toward your college costs including tuition, fees, room and board, and books. This amount stays the same no matter how much the school you are going to is. Your family’s expected contribution is the same whether you go to the state college down the street or the most expensive college in the country.

The FAFSA will determine whether you qualify for federal financial aid like Pell Grants and Stafford Student Loans.

What is the purpose of the FAFSA application beyond federal financial aid?

Well your college will probably also use it to determine the scholarships, grants, and work study programs that they will offer you as part of your overall financial aid package. Except for merit based grants that do not depend on financial need, your FAFSA report will determine how much money you will get from each college.

This answers the question “what is the purpose of the FAFSA application.”



Source by Stacy Fox

Federal Loans: Explore Your Online Education Aid Options

Staff Writers May 6, 2015

Federal loans, like other types of monetary loans, must be repaid with interest. There are benefits, however, of borrowing directly from the U.S. Department of Education or from organizations supported by the federal government. These loans often include low interest rates, flexible repayment plans, and deferment options.

Basic qualification criteria include: U.S. or eligible citizenship status, financial need, enrollment or acceptance in an eligible program, and satisfactory academic progress once enrolled. The financial aid office at your school or the school you plan to attend can provide additional information, but the Student Aid help pages offered by the Department of Education are a great place to start.

The Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) is where it all starts. You need to complete and submit this form to find out what types of federal assistance you may be qualified to receive. Keep the following in mind as you prepare your application:

  • Deadlines. There is an annual Federal deadline (e.g. Midnight CT, June 30, 2015 for the 2015-2015 school year). Each state also has a separate filing deadline and each institution establishes a deadline for its students to complete the necessary paperwork. Be sure to check with the school(s) you are interested in attending for more information.
  • Documentation. Locate the documents you ll need in order to complete the FAFSA, such as your social security number, driver s license, tax returns, income, and investments. If you are a dependant, you may also need your parents information.
  • Estimates: The FAFSA4caster is an online calculator that helps you determine what you may be eligible to receive.

It is free to complete and submit the FAFSA form. Students have three different filing options. Most students complete their FAFSA completely online. Once you ve created a login, the site will walk you through a set of in-screen submission forms. If you prefer to fill out your application on paper, you can download a PDF of the forms on the website, print and mail in your application. If you do not have a computer, you can also request a paper FAFSA application by calling 1-800-4-FED-AID.

While there are services out there that charge a fee to help you complete the process, your school s financial aid office should be able to assist for no additional charge. You can also watch a series of instructional videos on the FederalStudentAid YouTube channel. The U.S. Department of Education also provides detailed instructions and technical support through an entrance counseling program .

Once an award is offered, students will sign a Master Promissory Note (MPN), which will act as an agreement to the terms and conditions of the loan and repayment. Depending on loan and enrollment status, students can expect to pay a fixed rate on the federal loans outlined in their MPN. Currently, interest rates range between 3.86% and 5.41% .

There are two main types of federal loans. One is a direct student loan, which is a loan that is offered directly through the U.S. Department of Education. The other is an indirect loan, which is when the school acts the lender for the student. The loans within these categories may be subsidized or unsubsidized. With subsidized loans, the federal government pays the interest accrued during the student’s education. On the other hand, students who take out unsubsidized loans are responsible for all of the interest accrued, regardless of their academic status.

  • Eligibility: Undergraduate students enrolled at least half-time and demonstrate financial need
  • Annual award available: $3,500 to $5,500
  • Interest rate: 6.8% on loans initiated after July 1, 2015
  • Lender: U.S. Department of Education
  • Eligibility: Undergraduate and graduate students
  • Annual award available: Up to $5,000 for undergraduate students, up to $8,000 for graduate students.
  • Interest rate: 5%
  • Lender: College where the student is enrolled

If you take out more than one federal loan, you may qualify for a consolidation loan after you graduate, withdraw from school, or drop below half-time enrollment. Consolidation provides some benefits, such as a single monthly bill, flexible terms, and reduced payments.

  • Eligibility: Those who have borrowed at least one Direct Loan or Federal Family Education Loan that is currently in a grace period, being repaid, or in default (with some restrictions) are eligible.
  • Interest rate: A fixed rate determined by the rates of the loans being consolidated
  • Lender: U.S. Department of Education

Note that the details of all of the loans described above are subject to change. Refer to the Federal Student Aid website for the latest information on these and other federal financial aid options, including work-study.

Undergraduate and graduate students may be eligible for part-time employment to help pay for college expenses while they are enrolled in school. This is not a loan, but instead compensation for work performed on or off campus; compensation that is funded by the U.S. Department of Education.

  • Eligibility: Undergraduate, graduate, and professional students; qualification is determined through the FAFSA and based on financial need
  • Pay and hours: Earnings and number of hours depend on the amount of funding awarded to the student
  • Assignments: Coordinated through the school s financial aid office and student s employer; ideally relate to field of study

Every loan includes specific terms that outline what will be borrowed and how it will be paid back to the lender. This section of the guide describes some of the key terms of federal loans. Review your loan offers carefully before accepting.

In most cases loan repayment begins after graduation. However, repayment can also begin when and if your enrollment decreases to less than half-time. Repayment of PLUS loans must begin once you have received the full amount, even if you are still in school.

The lender or the loan servicer (i.e. a separate company that manages loan administration and collections) will determine when payments should be made, how often they should be made, and the amount to be paid.

It is possible to have a grace period between graduating, or drop in your enrollment hours, and when repayment starts. Some federal loans allow a six-month grace period and this can be extended or delayed due to special circumstances such as being called to active military duty or reenrolling in school. Check the terms of your loan package to find out more about the options available.

The lender or loan servicer will provide you with available options for repaying your loan, and the plans available vary depending on the types of loans you received. Primary repayment plan options are described below. Refer to the Federal Student Aid website for additional details.

  • Eligible loans: Direct Subsidized and Unsubsidized, Direct PLUS for Parents, Direct PLUS for Graduate and Professional Students, Direct Consolidation, Subsidized and Unsubsidized Stafford
  • Monthly payment: Fixed, $50 minimum
  • Time frame: Fixed for up to 10 years
  • Considerations: This is the default plan you will be expected to follow if you do not choose a plan at the time of repayment. May have the largest monthly payments, but loan is paid off earlier, accumulating less interest
  • Eligible loans: Direct Subsidized and Unsubsidized, Direct PLUS, Direct Consolidation
  • Monthly payment: The amount you pay each month begins at a lower rate, then increases periodically over your repayment period. Monthly amounts will cover at least the interest accrued on the loan between payments.
  • Time frame: Up to 10 years
  • Considerations: This loan is designed for individuals with low incomes, who may end up paying more over the life of the loan than they would with a standard plan, which is due to higher interest accumulation early on.
  • Eligible loans: Direct Subsidized and Unsubsidized, Direct PLUS, Direct Consolidation
  • Monthly payment: Fixed or graduated; may be lower than the standard plan
  • Time frame: Up to 25 years
  • Considerations: Must owe more than $30,000 on the loan you want to repay with this plan; may pay more over the life of the loan than with standard plan since more interest accumulates early when amount owed is higher.
  • Eligible loans: Direct Subsidized and Unsubsidized, Direct PLUS for Graduate and Professional Students, some Direct Consolidation
  • Monthly payment: Based on income and family size; capped at 15% of your discretionary income as calculated by the loan servicer; adjusted annually
  • Time frame: Up to 25 years; unpaid balance after that time may be forgiven
  • Considerations: Must have partial financial hardship to qualify for this plan; may be taxed on amount that is forgiven
  • Eligible loans: Direct Subsidized and Unsubsidized, Direct Plus for Graduate and Professional Students, some Direct Consolidation
  • Monthly payment: Based on annual income, family size, total loan amounts
  • Time frame: Up to 25 years; unpaid balance after that time may be forgiven
  • Considerations: May be taxed on amount that is forgiven
  • Eligible loans: Federal Family Education Loans (note: FFEL program loans have not been issued since July 1, 2010)
  • Monthly payment: Based on annual income; adjusted as income increases or decreases
  • Time frame: Up to 10 years
  • Considerations: Each lender determines how monthly payment will be calculated.
  • Eligible loans: Direct Subsidized and Unsubsidized, Direct PLUS for Graduate and Professional Students, some Consolidation loans
  • Monthly payment: Based on annual income; adjusted as income increases or decreases
  • Time frame: Up to 20 years; unpaid balance after that time may be forgiven
  • Considerations: Must have partial financial hardship to qualify for this plan; May be taxed on amount that is forgiven

Perkins Loans have different options and plans, with payment based on the amount that was borrowed. Students should check with their school s financial aid office to find out more about repayment of these loans.

Loan forgiveness, cancellation, and discharge options vary depending on the type of loan. Students with outstanding Direct Loans, FFEL Program Loans, or Perkins Loans may be eligible under a wide range of conditions, such as:

  • Borrower s total and permanent disability or death
  • Bankruptcy (in rare cases)
  • Closed school
  • False loan certification (from school)
  • False loan certification (identity theft)
  • Unpaid refund (from school)
  • Teacher loan forgiveness
  • Public service employment

Keep in mind that while there are often provisions for forgiveness, student loan debt generally cannot be cancelled or forgiven as part of a bankruptcy claim.

If you think you may be eligible for one of these programs, contact your loan servicer for more information and to submit an application.


http://ift.tt/1FjbC5B

Federal Loans: Explore Your Online Education Aid Options

Staff Writers May 6, 2015

Federal loans, like other types of monetary loans, must be repaid with interest. There are benefits, however, of borrowing directly from the U.S. Department of Education or from organizations supported by the federal government. These loans often include low interest rates, flexible repayment plans, and deferment options.

Basic qualification criteria include: U.S. or eligible citizenship status, financial need, enrollment or acceptance in an eligible program, and satisfactory academic progress once enrolled. The financial aid office at your school or the school you plan to attend can provide additional information, but the Student Aid help pages offered by the Department of Education are a great place to start.

The Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) is where it all starts. You need to complete and submit this form to find out what types of federal assistance you may be qualified to receive. Keep the following in mind as you prepare your application:

  • Deadlines. There is an annual Federal deadline (e.g. Midnight CT, June 30, 2015 for the 2015-2015 school year). Each state also has a separate filing deadline and each institution establishes a deadline for its students to complete the necessary paperwork. Be sure to check with the school(s) you are interested in attending for more information.
  • Documentation. Locate the documents you ll need in order to complete the FAFSA, such as your social security number, driver s license, tax returns, income, and investments. If you are a dependant, you may also need your parents information.
  • Estimates: The FAFSA4caster is an online calculator that helps you determine what you may be eligible to receive.

It is free to complete and submit the FAFSA form. Students have three different filing options. Most students complete their FAFSA completely online. Once you ve created a login, the site will walk you through a set of in-screen submission forms. If you prefer to fill out your application on paper, you can download a PDF of the forms on the website, print and mail in your application. If you do not have a computer, you can also request a paper FAFSA application by calling 1-800-4-FED-AID.

While there are services out there that charge a fee to help you complete the process, your school s financial aid office should be able to assist for no additional charge. You can also watch a series of instructional videos on the FederalStudentAid YouTube channel. The U.S. Department of Education also provides detailed instructions and technical support through an entrance counseling program .

Once an award is offered, students will sign a Master Promissory Note (MPN), which will act as an agreement to the terms and conditions of the loan and repayment. Depending on loan and enrollment status, students can expect to pay a fixed rate on the federal loans outlined in their MPN. Currently, interest rates range between 3.86% and 5.41% .

There are two main types of federal loans. One is a direct student loan, which is a loan that is offered directly through the U.S. Department of Education. The other is an indirect loan, which is when the school acts the lender for the student. The loans within these categories may be subsidized or unsubsidized. With subsidized loans, the federal government pays the interest accrued during the student’s education. On the other hand, students who take out unsubsidized loans are responsible for all of the interest accrued, regardless of their academic status.

  • Eligibility: Undergraduate students enrolled at least half-time and demonstrate financial need
  • Annual award available: $3,500 to $5,500
  • Interest rate: 6.8% on loans initiated after July 1, 2015
  • Lender: U.S. Department of Education
  • Eligibility: Undergraduate and graduate students
  • Annual award available: Up to $5,000 for undergraduate students, up to $8,000 for graduate students.
  • Interest rate: 5%
  • Lender: College where the student is enrolled

If you take out more than one federal loan, you may qualify for a consolidation loan after you graduate, withdraw from school, or drop below half-time enrollment. Consolidation provides some benefits, such as a single monthly bill, flexible terms, and reduced payments.

  • Eligibility: Those who have borrowed at least one Direct Loan or Federal Family Education Loan that is currently in a grace period, being repaid, or in default (with some restrictions) are eligible.
  • Interest rate: A fixed rate determined by the rates of the loans being consolidated
  • Lender: U.S. Department of Education

Note that the details of all of the loans described above are subject to change. Refer to the Federal Student Aid website for the latest information on these and other federal financial aid options, including work-study.

Undergraduate and graduate students may be eligible for part-time employment to help pay for college expenses while they are enrolled in school. This is not a loan, but instead compensation for work performed on or off campus; compensation that is funded by the U.S. Department of Education.

  • Eligibility: Undergraduate, graduate, and professional students; qualification is determined through the FAFSA and based on financial need
  • Pay and hours: Earnings and number of hours depend on the amount of funding awarded to the student
  • Assignments: Coordinated through the school s financial aid office and student s employer; ideally relate to field of study

Every loan includes specific terms that outline what will be borrowed and how it will be paid back to the lender. This section of the guide describes some of the key terms of federal loans. Review your loan offers carefully before accepting.

In most cases loan repayment begins after graduation. However, repayment can also begin when and if your enrollment decreases to less than half-time. Repayment of PLUS loans must begin once you have received the full amount, even if you are still in school.

The lender or the loan servicer (i.e. a separate company that manages loan administration and collections) will determine when payments should be made, how often they should be made, and the amount to be paid.

It is possible to have a grace period between graduating, or drop in your enrollment hours, and when repayment starts. Some federal loans allow a six-month grace period and this can be extended or delayed due to special circumstances such as being called to active military duty or reenrolling in school. Check the terms of your loan package to find out more about the options available.

The lender or loan servicer will provide you with available options for repaying your loan, and the plans available vary depending on the types of loans you received. Primary repayment plan options are described below. Refer to the Federal Student Aid website for additional details.

  • Eligible loans: Direct Subsidized and Unsubsidized, Direct PLUS for Parents, Direct PLUS for Graduate and Professional Students, Direct Consolidation, Subsidized and Unsubsidized Stafford
  • Monthly payment: Fixed, $50 minimum
  • Time frame: Fixed for up to 10 years
  • Considerations: This is the default plan you will be expected to follow if you do not choose a plan at the time of repayment. May have the largest monthly payments, but loan is paid off earlier, accumulating less interest
  • Eligible loans: Direct Subsidized and Unsubsidized, Direct PLUS, Direct Consolidation
  • Monthly payment: The amount you pay each month begins at a lower rate, then increases periodically over your repayment period. Monthly amounts will cover at least the interest accrued on the loan between payments.
  • Time frame: Up to 10 years
  • Considerations: This loan is designed for individuals with low incomes, who may end up paying more over the life of the loan than they would with a standard plan, which is due to higher interest accumulation early on.
  • Eligible loans: Direct Subsidized and Unsubsidized, Direct PLUS, Direct Consolidation
  • Monthly payment: Fixed or graduated; may be lower than the standard plan
  • Time frame: Up to 25 years
  • Considerations: Must owe more than $30,000 on the loan you want to repay with this plan; may pay more over the life of the loan than with standard plan since more interest accumulates early when amount owed is higher.
  • Eligible loans: Direct Subsidized and Unsubsidized, Direct PLUS for Graduate and Professional Students, some Direct Consolidation
  • Monthly payment: Based on income and family size; capped at 15% of your discretionary income as calculated by the loan servicer; adjusted annually
  • Time frame: Up to 25 years; unpaid balance after that time may be forgiven
  • Considerations: Must have partial financial hardship to qualify for this plan; may be taxed on amount that is forgiven
  • Eligible loans: Direct Subsidized and Unsubsidized, Direct Plus for Graduate and Professional Students, some Direct Consolidation
  • Monthly payment: Based on annual income, family size, total loan amounts
  • Time frame: Up to 25 years; unpaid balance after that time may be forgiven
  • Considerations: May be taxed on amount that is forgiven
  • Eligible loans: Federal Family Education Loans (note: FFEL program loans have not been issued since July 1, 2010)
  • Monthly payment: Based on annual income; adjusted as income increases or decreases
  • Time frame: Up to 10 years
  • Considerations: Each lender determines how monthly payment will be calculated.
  • Eligible loans: Direct Subsidized and Unsubsidized, Direct PLUS for Graduate and Professional Students, some Consolidation loans
  • Monthly payment: Based on annual income; adjusted as income increases or decreases
  • Time frame: Up to 20 years; unpaid balance after that time may be forgiven
  • Considerations: Must have partial financial hardship to qualify for this plan; May be taxed on amount that is forgiven

Perkins Loans have different options and plans, with payment based on the amount that was borrowed. Students should check with their school s financial aid office to find out more about repayment of these loans.

Loan forgiveness, cancellation, and discharge options vary depending on the type of loan. Students with outstanding Direct Loans, FFEL Program Loans, or Perkins Loans may be eligible under a wide range of conditions, such as:

  • Borrower s total and permanent disability or death
  • Bankruptcy (in rare cases)
  • Closed school
  • False loan certification (from school)
  • False loan certification (identity theft)
  • Unpaid refund (from school)
  • Teacher loan forgiveness
  • Public service employment

Keep in mind that while there are often provisions for forgiveness, student loan debt generally cannot be cancelled or forgiven as part of a bankruptcy claim.

If you think you may be eligible for one of these programs, contact your loan servicer for more information and to submit an application.


http://loan.remmont.com/news/federal_loans_explore_your_online_education_aid_options/2015-05-18-1826


College nowadays is an expensive undertaking; depending on your child’s choice of college, you may end up paying hundreds of thousands of dollars. You won’t even be able to depend on the college fund that you saved up, since increasing fees mean the fund might not even be enough to cover the customary four years. This is why you and your child should consult expert college financial advisors to help you both with paying for college. Experienced college planning advisors will help you focus on the main source of a lot of financial aid: the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) Program. Groups like The Studemont Group College Funding Solutions, LLC can help ensure that your application for FAFSA will be approved and you can get as much financial aid as possible.

FAFSA Details 2015-2016 - College Loan Consultant

Your FAFSA Answers How Much Will It Cost You?

The FAFSA (Free Application for Federal Student Aid) form is your first step in finding out what college will really cost you, and how much college loan debt you will bear.

Your initial FAFSA year is the year before you fill out the form. Careful financial planning for that year can make a big difference, but any preparation for the answers you will give on the form is better than none.

The answers you supply will:

  1. determine if you qualify for a Pell grant
allow you to be considered for your college s own grants and scholarships automatically fill out free grant applications in some states. (State college loans and grants are different programs in each state.) decide how much and which kind of federal aid (loans, work-study programs) you qualify for

If you have time before filing to adjust your finances, bear in mind that you should not

  • allow the student to have assets. There should be no assets in the student s name-

all savings plans, investments, accounts, etc. should be under the parent s name(s). Why? Because student

contributions are weighed much higher than parents contributions.

have a lot of cash on hand. Money in savings and checking accounts (parents included) will mean that the student

is going to qualify for less aid. If you have money, use it to pay off debts which will not be taken into account when your EFC is calculated.

accept money from grandparents for college. Ask them to wait until the student graduates, otherwise it will count towards the expected family contribution. withdraw retirement funds. During the base year for your application, do not withdraw money from any type

of retirement fund, because this type of investment is not included as an asset.

take out a home equity loan for paying college expenses. I won t say that it is never right to use

your home for this purpose, (because in some situations it is) but use a home equity line of credit instead.

That way, any unused money won t show up as an asset the following year.

These are the basic mistakes to avoid. Doing what you can to avoid them is a legitimate strategy. Some other strategies are not as legitimate and can get you investigated and penalized. Financial aid administrators are trained to spot inconsistencies and they can recommend investigation by federal, state or local authorities.

A popular (illegal) strategy a few years ago was having a parent enroll in a college at the same time as their child, but

then letting their registration lapse after the financial aid application was processed. An enrolled parent no longer counts towards a lower EFC as a result of this widespread fraud.

If you pay a consultant for advice (and each year parents pay thousands of dollars) make sure it is for:

  • legitimate strategies to manage income for maximum financial aid (FAFSA deferred compensation is what is most asked about)
ways to target the schools which best meet your needs, both financially and academically finding the best financial aid for colleges

and not just for filling out a form which is free to submit.

If you are interested in this type of planning, you can get the same level of professional help (without the huge fees) on the internet. A wider client base allows most consultants to charge lower fees.

(Paragraphs below allow you to access more information about each topic)

and other basic questions answered about the form, such as, why is it used, when should it be filed, who has access to the information, etc. Learn more about this must-do for financial aid

has been redesigned for greater security in dealing with your personal information. It has also been made more user friendly with new help features and the ability to skip over questions that do not apply to you. And for 2015-2015, the site will tell you what to do based on your history there. More about the official website

is your first step in this process, but one you will need throughout your college years (and after). Both student and parent should each apply for one. Read more about the PIN

you need to consider is not just the federal one which is the same for all students, but your state deadline- which can occur very soon after the new form is available.

Do not miss out on state grant aid or college financial aid. Both of these are assigned early to students, as well as campus-based programs like federal Perkins student loans and work-study. Check your deadlines every year because they change. See your deadline

is the quickest and easiest way to complete this form. The online application minimizes mistakes because if contradictory information is entered or if an entry is skipped, you will not be able to advance to the next question until you correct it. Using the online form allows you to receive your SAR (student aid report) more quickly. Before you start it, read about the online form

should be downloaded whether or not you use it as your submission. Anytime you complete an online form, you should make a duplicate hard copy for reference. Storing previous years FAFSAs (and student aid reports) can also be useful for comparing differing levels of financial aid. See the exact questions before you file with a printable application

came out on January 1, 2015. Changes have been made to this form which make it easier to finish and submit. (And this will definitely increase the number of students who receive aid.) The instructions are clearer, questions have been combined and simplified and the notices for help (both online and phone) are much easier to locate on every page. Learn some best practices to use when filling out the application

Your application results in a number your EFC (Expected Family Contribution). It is this number that will decide your eligibility for federal, state and college aid. No matter how high this number looks to you, DO NOT GIVE UP HOPE because even though federal aid is based on it,

  • each school makes its own decision about what to award students
schools know EFC numbers are artificially high because of federal needs guidelines and they take this into account you can make corrections if any of your information is wrong your EFC number is not written in stone- It will change every year as your circumstances change and as Congress makes changes to the EFC formula (It can even be adjusted during the year by a financial aid administrator if there is a documented loss of income.)

some of these you are required to make, because of mistakes or information conflicts. Or you might need to add financial data if you only provided estimates. If you want to add or drop a school on the 2015-2016 form, you must use corrections to do so. But the government does place some restrictions on which information you are allowed to correct. Learn how to make your corrections

you have an opportunity to plan ahead for the next year. Renewal is not automatic. You will manually file every year and your numbers will change.

Maybe your income will go up (or down). Perhaps a sibling will be going to college. You might be living in an area that qualifies for federal disaster relief, or whatever- things change. And if you filed too late to qualify for some state aid this year, you will know enough to do it earlier next year.

See what to expect when you renew

Planning ahead does not only mean your finances. Targeting the schools you want to be considered for should play a large role in your financial aid application. By accessing a list of colleges that are eligible for federal financial aid (along with their identifying school codes) before you fill in the form, you can do your research and make the most out of your opportunity to let 10 schools know about your interest. See the entire list of school codes

Some students are selected by the Department of Education or their colleges to have the information submitted on their applications, verified. In the past the selection process was random, but new regulations are transforming it to be both more efficient and more targeted. Find out how the changes might affect you, as well as learning about the current 2015 verification


http://loan.remmont.com/news/fafsa_details_2015_2016_college_loan_consultant/2015-05-15-1713
FAFSA Details 2015-2016 - College Loan Consultant

Your FAFSA Answers How Much Will It Cost You?

The FAFSA (Free Application for Federal Student Aid) form is your first step in finding out what college will really cost you, and how much college loan debt you will bear.

Your initial FAFSA year is the year before you fill out the form. Careful financial planning for that year can make a big difference, but any preparation for the answers you will give on the form is better than none.

The answers you supply will:

  1. determine if you qualify for a Pell grant
allow you to be considered for your college s own grants and scholarships automatically fill out free grant applications in some states. (State college loans and grants are different programs in each state.) decide how much and which kind of federal aid (loans, work-study programs) you qualify for

If you have time before filing to adjust your finances, bear in mind that you should not

  • allow the student to have assets. There should be no assets in the student s name-

all savings plans, investments, accounts, etc. should be under the parent s name(s). Why? Because student

contributions are weighed much higher than parents contributions.

have a lot of cash on hand. Money in savings and checking accounts (parents included) will mean that the student

is going to qualify for less aid. If you have money, use it to pay off debts which will not be taken into account when your EFC is calculated.

accept money from grandparents for college. Ask them to wait until the student graduates, otherwise it will count towards the expected family contribution. withdraw retirement funds. During the base year for your application, do not withdraw money from any type

of retirement fund, because this type of investment is not included as an asset.

take out a home equity loan for paying college expenses. I won t say that it is never right to use

your home for this purpose, (because in some situations it is) but use a home equity line of credit instead.

That way, any unused money won t show up as an asset the following year.

These are the basic mistakes to avoid. Doing what you can to avoid them is a legitimate strategy. Some other strategies are not as legitimate and can get you investigated and penalized. Financial aid administrators are trained to spot inconsistencies and they can recommend investigation by federal, state or local authorities.

A popular (illegal) strategy a few years ago was having a parent enroll in a college at the same time as their child, but

then letting their registration lapse after the financial aid application was processed. An enrolled parent no longer counts towards a lower EFC as a result of this widespread fraud.

If you pay a consultant for advice (and each year parents pay thousands of dollars) make sure it is for:

  • legitimate strategies to manage income for maximum financial aid (FAFSA deferred compensation is what is most asked about)
ways to target the schools which best meet your needs, both financially and academically finding the best financial aid for colleges

and not just for filling out a form which is free to submit.

If you are interested in this type of planning, you can get the same level of professional help (without the huge fees) on the internet. A wider client base allows most consultants to charge lower fees.

(Paragraphs below allow you to access more information about each topic)

and other basic questions answered about the form, such as, why is it used, when should it be filed, who has access to the information, etc. Learn more about this must-do for financial aid

has been redesigned for greater security in dealing with your personal information. It has also been made more user friendly with new help features and the ability to skip over questions that do not apply to you. And for 2015-2015, the site will tell you what to do based on your history there. More about the official website

is your first step in this process, but one you will need throughout your college years (and after). Both student and parent should each apply for one. Read more about the PIN

you need to consider is not just the federal one which is the same for all students, but your state deadline- which can occur very soon after the new form is available.

Do not miss out on state grant aid or college financial aid. Both of these are assigned early to students, as well as campus-based programs like federal Perkins student loans and work-study. Check your deadlines every year because they change. See your deadline

is the quickest and easiest way to complete this form. The online application minimizes mistakes because if contradictory information is entered or if an entry is skipped, you will not be able to advance to the next question until you correct it. Using the online form allows you to receive your SAR (student aid report) more quickly. Before you start it, read about the online form

should be downloaded whether or not you use it as your submission. Anytime you complete an online form, you should make a duplicate hard copy for reference. Storing previous years FAFSAs (and student aid reports) can also be useful for comparing differing levels of financial aid. See the exact questions before you file with a printable application

came out on January 1, 2015. Changes have been made to this form which make it easier to finish and submit. (And this will definitely increase the number of students who receive aid.) The instructions are clearer, questions have been combined and simplified and the notices for help (both online and phone) are much easier to locate on every page. Learn some best practices to use when filling out the application

Your application results in a number your EFC (Expected Family Contribution). It is this number that will decide your eligibility for federal, state and college aid. No matter how high this number looks to you, DO NOT GIVE UP HOPE because even though federal aid is based on it,

  • each school makes its own decision about what to award students
schools know EFC numbers are artificially high because of federal needs guidelines and they take this into account you can make corrections if any of your information is wrong your EFC number is not written in stone- It will change every year as your circumstances change and as Congress makes changes to the EFC formula (It can even be adjusted during the year by a financial aid administrator if there is a documented loss of income.)

some of these you are required to make, because of mistakes or information conflicts. Or you might need to add financial data if you only provided estimates. If you want to add or drop a school on the 2015-2016 form, you must use corrections to do so. But the government does place some restrictions on which information you are allowed to correct. Learn how to make your corrections

you have an opportunity to plan ahead for the next year. Renewal is not automatic. You will manually file every year and your numbers will change.

Maybe your income will go up (or down). Perhaps a sibling will be going to college. You might be living in an area that qualifies for federal disaster relief, or whatever- things change. And if you filed too late to qualify for some state aid this year, you will know enough to do it earlier next year.

See what to expect when you renew

Planning ahead does not only mean your finances. Targeting the schools you want to be considered for should play a large role in your financial aid application. By accessing a list of colleges that are eligible for federal financial aid (along with their identifying school codes) before you fill in the form, you can do your research and make the most out of your opportunity to let 10 schools know about your interest. See the entire list of school codes

Some students are selected by the Department of Education or their colleges to have the information submitted on their applications, verified. In the past the selection process was random, but new regulations are transforming it to be both more efficient and more targeted. Find out how the changes might affect you, as well as learning about the current 2015 verification


http://ift.tt/1B1rvtl

How to Get a Student Loan without a Cosigner

Student Loan without a Cosigner

You’re a student planning on starting an integral chapter in your life in the form of your college education, but unfortunately you’re hindered by a shortage of funds for financing it. The best way out of this conundrum is to apply for financial aid by accurately completing your Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). If your application clearly displays a need for aid, you’ll not be disappointed, and you’ll be awarded federal loans, grants, and jobs better known as federal work-study programs. The federal loans are the best way to get student loans without cosigner ; moreover, you’re not required to have a strong credit history for getting approval for these loans. So, if you’re finding more information about how to get a student loan without a cosigner. then the federal loans are the perfect answer for your query.

how to get a student loan without a cosigner was rated

7 out of 10 based on 14 rating(s)

Q: How do I get a student loan without a cosigner?

A: Getting a student loan without a cosigner maybe difficult but it is not an impossible job. First of all you need a good credit history, therefore always focus on building one. Federal loans do not demand a cosigner but private lenders would want a cosigner to ensure that the loans are paid. If you are unable to get a cosigner then you might be charged higher interest rates as the risks for the lender also increases.

Q: Where can I get a student loan without a cosigner?

A: Getting a student loan without a cosigner is not at all a problem as none of the federal financial aid options require students to have a cosigner to stand eligible for loan. Students can opt for the Stafford and Perkin loans. They can apply to both these loans by submitting the FAFSA form.

Q: As I read about the student loans without cosigner, there was mention of the course on Business Ethics. What are the contents of this course?

A: It is common to get to read about the course on Business Ethics while going through the Student Loans without Cosigner. This course usually is worth 2 credits in total. It is designed to provide students with ample understanding of the ethical issues of a business environment. Students are also given ample hands on experience in this course.

Q: I plan to get a student loan without a cosigner for my next degree, so what will be the best way to go about it?

A: To get a student loan without a cosigner may not come easy. Many lenders are apprehensive of lending money to students as they have little or no credit history. As you have time before you go for the next degree it is advised to work on building a credible credit history. If you have a steady income then it can help as lenders would also want to see if you can repay the amount. Apart from that there are always government loans available.

Q: If I get a loan without a co-signer, will my loan be more expensive?

A: The answer will depend on the loan product’s requirements that you are considering at the time you wish to borrow. Generally a co-signer will be providing a lender more security and therefore provides the lender with a ‘safer bet’ that it will be repaid. If this safety is taken away, there is greater risk to the lender and the lender may wish to make the loan more expensive to cover the risk.

Q: I need a student loan without a cosigner, as I have no immediate family willing to sign. Is this possible?

A: This is certainly possible but a lender will need to consider the amount borrowed and any other relevant factors to determine whether or not it requires a co-signer. Some lenders would prefer not to have a co-signor to deal with. It would be best for you to speak to the lenders you are interested in.

Q: How to get a student loan without a cosigner?

A: To get a student loan without a cosigner there are two main sources, federal and private banking institutions. Federal loans do not require a cosigner, while private loans require cosigners along with a credit score record. If you do not have a good credit history then private financial institutes may offer high interest rates to compensate for the risk involved.

Q: Can a student get a loan without a cosigner?

A: Yes, a student can get a loan without a cosigner. Usually, federal loans do not require cosigners or even a credit score. These loans are designed for students in need of financial help. They are easy to get, requiring students to simply demonstrate a financial need through a FAFSA form. This form is available online and is absolutely free of cost.

Q: How do you get student loan without cosigner?

A: To get a student loan without a cosigner you need to have a good credit score. Having a strong credit history can bring the interest rate down. Other than that, the loans offered by federal government do not require a cosigner. They are given on need basis alone and for that you need to submit the FAFSA form given online.

Q: Where can get student loan without cosigner?

A: Many students do not have a cosigner and for them the best option is to apply for federal loans. Not only do these loans offer low interest rates, but they also have flexible terms. If these loans are not enough to manage the study expenses then other options can be explored. With an impressive credit score you can opt for private loans as well because with a good credit record a cosigner is not required.

Q: How to get a loan without a cosigner or any background check?

A: Federal student loans demand no cosigner and no background check. These loans are geared towards helping students coming from all social classes attain education. The Stafford loan, Perkins loan, and graduate PLUS loan are examples of popular federal loans. You can apply for these loans by filling out a FAFSA form online.

Q: How to get college loan without cosigner?

A: If you want to get a loan without a cosigner, federal loans should be your preferred choice. You are not supposed to have a strong credit history to get these loans. There are also some private organizations that offer loans without a cosigner. However, these organizations charge excessive costs for such a loan.

Q: Are there any student loan providers where you don’t need a cosigner?

A: Yes, there are a number of federal loans you can apply for without needing a cosigner. These student loans are designed for students in need of financial assistance. Federally funded student loans are need-based. All you have to do is fill out a FAFSA form online which is available on the official web page of federal financial aid.

Q: Can a college student get a loan without a cosigner and not have to go through any check?

A: Yes, students can apply for loans that require no cosigner or credit checks. These loans usually fall in the category of federal student loans. These loans are need-based and are easy to apply for. All you have to do is fill out a FAFSA form and submit it online. The main purpose of such loans is to help individuals in need and allow them to acquire college education.


http://loan.remmont.com/news/how_to_get_a_student_loan_without_a_cosigner/2015-05-14-1625
How to Get a Student Loan without a Cosigner

Student Loan without a Cosigner

You’re a student planning on starting an integral chapter in your life in the form of your college education, but unfortunately you’re hindered by a shortage of funds for financing it. The best way out of this conundrum is to apply for financial aid by accurately completing your Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). If your application clearly displays a need for aid, you’ll not be disappointed, and you’ll be awarded federal loans, grants, and jobs better known as federal work-study programs. The federal loans are the best way to get student loans without cosigner ; moreover, you’re not required to have a strong credit history for getting approval for these loans. So, if you’re finding more information about how to get a student loan without a cosigner. then the federal loans are the perfect answer for your query.

how to get a student loan without a cosigner was rated

7 out of 10 based on 14 rating(s)

Q: How do I get a student loan without a cosigner?

A: Getting a student loan without a cosigner maybe difficult but it is not an impossible job. First of all you need a good credit history, therefore always focus on building one. Federal loans do not demand a cosigner but private lenders would want a cosigner to ensure that the loans are paid. If you are unable to get a cosigner then you might be charged higher interest rates as the risks for the lender also increases.

Q: Where can I get a student loan without a cosigner?

A: Getting a student loan without a cosigner is not at all a problem as none of the federal financial aid options require students to have a cosigner to stand eligible for loan. Students can opt for the Stafford and Perkin loans. They can apply to both these loans by submitting the FAFSA form.

Q: As I read about the student loans without cosigner, there was mention of the course on Business Ethics. What are the contents of this course?

A: It is common to get to read about the course on Business Ethics while going through the Student Loans without Cosigner. This course usually is worth 2 credits in total. It is designed to provide students with ample understanding of the ethical issues of a business environment. Students are also given ample hands on experience in this course.

Q: I plan to get a student loan without a cosigner for my next degree, so what will be the best way to go about it?

A: To get a student loan without a cosigner may not come easy. Many lenders are apprehensive of lending money to students as they have little or no credit history. As you have time before you go for the next degree it is advised to work on building a credible credit history. If you have a steady income then it can help as lenders would also want to see if you can repay the amount. Apart from that there are always government loans available.

Q: If I get a loan without a co-signer, will my loan be more expensive?

A: The answer will depend on the loan product’s requirements that you are considering at the time you wish to borrow. Generally a co-signer will be providing a lender more security and therefore provides the lender with a ‘safer bet’ that it will be repaid. If this safety is taken away, there is greater risk to the lender and the lender may wish to make the loan more expensive to cover the risk.

Q: I need a student loan without a cosigner, as I have no immediate family willing to sign. Is this possible?

A: This is certainly possible but a lender will need to consider the amount borrowed and any other relevant factors to determine whether or not it requires a co-signer. Some lenders would prefer not to have a co-signor to deal with. It would be best for you to speak to the lenders you are interested in.

Q: How to get a student loan without a cosigner?

A: To get a student loan without a cosigner there are two main sources, federal and private banking institutions. Federal loans do not require a cosigner, while private loans require cosigners along with a credit score record. If you do not have a good credit history then private financial institutes may offer high interest rates to compensate for the risk involved.

Q: Can a student get a loan without a cosigner?

A: Yes, a student can get a loan without a cosigner. Usually, federal loans do not require cosigners or even a credit score. These loans are designed for students in need of financial help. They are easy to get, requiring students to simply demonstrate a financial need through a FAFSA form. This form is available online and is absolutely free of cost.

Q: How do you get student loan without cosigner?

A: To get a student loan without a cosigner you need to have a good credit score. Having a strong credit history can bring the interest rate down. Other than that, the loans offered by federal government do not require a cosigner. They are given on need basis alone and for that you need to submit the FAFSA form given online.

Q: Where can get student loan without cosigner?

A: Many students do not have a cosigner and for them the best option is to apply for federal loans. Not only do these loans offer low interest rates, but they also have flexible terms. If these loans are not enough to manage the study expenses then other options can be explored. With an impressive credit score you can opt for private loans as well because with a good credit record a cosigner is not required.

Q: How to get a loan without a cosigner or any background check?

A: Federal student loans demand no cosigner and no background check. These loans are geared towards helping students coming from all social classes attain education. The Stafford loan, Perkins loan, and graduate PLUS loan are examples of popular federal loans. You can apply for these loans by filling out a FAFSA form online.

Q: How to get college loan without cosigner?

A: If you want to get a loan without a cosigner, federal loans should be your preferred choice. You are not supposed to have a strong credit history to get these loans. There are also some private organizations that offer loans without a cosigner. However, these organizations charge excessive costs for such a loan.

Q: Are there any student loan providers where you don’t need a cosigner?

A: Yes, there are a number of federal loans you can apply for without needing a cosigner. These student loans are designed for students in need of financial assistance. Federally funded student loans are need-based. All you have to do is fill out a FAFSA form online which is available on the official web page of federal financial aid.

Q: Can a college student get a loan without a cosigner and not have to go through any check?

A: Yes, students can apply for loans that require no cosigner or credit checks. These loans usually fall in the category of federal student loans. These loans are need-based and are easy to apply for. All you have to do is fill out a FAFSA form and submit it online. The main purpose of such loans is to help individuals in need and allow them to acquire college education.


http://ift.tt/1QLJw8e
Free Money for College Students

Money for college and funding resources are available for parents and students but the information is so scattered that most opportunities and deadlines can pass by without ever being heard of. This website is dedicated to advancing that cause of free college and offers free advice and information for anyone looking to find scholarships, grants, contests, internships, admissions strategies, and news about the education industry or anything else related to college.

FAFSA is a commonly used abbreviation for the Free Application for Federal Student Aid. Every student should file one of these reports at the beginning of each year, even if they don t expect to be eligible for federal financial aid. Federal funding includes the Pell Grant and eligibility for subsidized student loans, and eligibility is determined by the student s financial situation. The more you need money for college, the more likely FAFSA can help you. Click here to learn more about FAFSA - and then when you re ready to sign up, head over to the FAFSA home page to register for a pin to access your account, and apply for federal student aid.

Upromise is a great program that helps students and parents and even friends or family save money for college through everyday spending. Everything from certain brains of food to credit cards and even cars can deliver a rebate to a college savings account.

The service is totally free and they ve been around for a long while supporting higher education. The amounts you earn may not be huge, but you can also get friends and family to sign up to support their favorite college bound student. If you ve already been to school and have debts to pay off, this program by Upromise can even help you reduce the amount owed on your student loans. Every little bit counts, and when it comes to paying for college you can t afford to pass up any free opportunities.

Chances are, no one source is going to give you all the college money you need to pay for tuition and expenses. The key to graduating debt-free requires drawing on a lot of these sources never turning down an opportunity for free money just because it doesn t seem like enough.

The Free College Blog website is divided into the following five categories. Click on a category headline to get more articles, advice, and information related to that college topic:

  • Admissions Strategies Advice on getting into the school you want to with the best program for your major and the best financial assistance. See strategies for standardized tests and school applications.
  • Degree Information Search schools and degree programs to find the educational path that fits your goals and personal situation.  More and more colleges are offering online and nontraditional degrees, so be sure to take a look at all the options available before registering for a school and starting a course of study that you re not quite sure about.
  • Financial Aid - Advice and updates on government and school programs for students and families with lower incomes or unmet need. Financial aid is also used by universities to attract the best students. Learn about the Free Application for Federal Student Aid and various state or institutional programs that can help college students pay for tuition.
  • Free Stuff Contests and ideas that can get students freebies, free college classes, or any other completely free resources worth checking out.
  • Government and Policy Many aspects of education are determined at the government and policy level.  This section deals with political developments related to students, schools, and teachers
  • Jobs and Careers A major reason for attending college is to get a better job even a career after graduation.  This section includes news about the job market and what types of organizations are hiring.
  • Scholarships Private organizations and charities offering free money for college students based in need, academic merit, awards, or other accomplishments. Find news on new scholarship and funding programs and strategies on how to win an award. Also, be sure to check out the free college scholarship search a totally free service provided by FreeCollegeBlog.com that doesn t require any registration. Scholarship grant programs are available for graduate or undergraduate students, contests are open to middle-schoolers and some awards are even for middle-aged students, parents, and professionals who want to return to school.
  • Student Loans and Credit A last resort. Most of the advice on this website is reasons to avoid student loans and credit cards. This category primarily contains links about the education industry and the factors driving up tuition, but it also explains how debt can be used responsibly as a supplement to other sources of money. Recent credit market problems have made finding student loans a little bit more difficult, and we re considering a partnership with some student loan search engine(s) to provide a link to services that best help students find money to borrow for school.
  • Textbooks Books are a significant cost of education and the prices are headed up for traditional paper books sold in traditional bookstores on or around campus.  Fortunately, new technology is providing new alternatives for students who want to download digital textbooks or rent through a national book rental clearing house.

If you have any questions, problems, or ideas related to paying for school, feel welcome to leave a comment on one of the related topics. I am glad to assist any way we can or help point you in the right direction. Finding free money for college isn t easy, in fact it s a lot of hard work and research. You ll have to do the work part, but we re here to provide the knowledge.

Some people are tempted to pay for an expensive financial aid adviser or standardized testing coach but the costs usually exceed the potential benefit. Books, and of course the internet, are the best tools in finding a free college education.

So welcome to Free College Blog, I hope you stay a while and find the answers you re looking for!

Free money for college is out there Are you working for your share?

Graduate college debt free: It is possible!


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School Grants.com - The Ultimate Grant Database

Figuring out how you are going to afford the high costs of higher education can be an intimidating prospect for anyone. However, you should not be dissuaded from furthering your education because you think you will not be able to afford the expense.

Instead, spend some time researching all of the financial aid or college grants you may qualify for; some of which may include federal school grants. Federal grants are a type of financial aid that you will not have to pay back after graduation, and can be used to cover any of the costs of attending college.

This type of financial aid is awarded solely based on the financial need of the student, especially looking at the Expected Family Contribution section of your Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA ) report; so make sure that you have completely and honestly completed your FAFSA application to have the best chance of receiving federal grants.

These grants are usually deposited into your student account, but can also be paid out to you by check or even deposited into your bank account. There are two types of federal student grants: the Pell Grant and the Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant (FSEOG).

Besides these two federal student grant programs, your college may have certain funds set aside as student college grants. To find out more information about this available source of financial aid, you will need to visit your school s financial aid office early and often. Most grant money is very limited and is distributed quickly, so complete your school s financial aid application as soon as possible.

The first step to receiving federal student aid of any kind is to fill out the FAFSA; in addition, most schools have their own financial aid forms you will need to complete to find out if you qualify for any local or private financial aid. As grant money is almost always reserved for students whose families demonstrate legitimate financial need, you may find that your own family s financial resources limit your eligibility for grant programs. In that case, it is important that you make use of all types of financial aid, including student loans and work-study.

Today student loans and financial aid are almost a given for college kids heading off to school. Few parents have the financial resources to pay all of the tuition for their children, and so most students fill out a FAFSA and apply for loans. This has not always been the case, however. Student loans are quite a modern invention.

The first recorded student loan program was developed by Harvard University in 1840. These early student loans were private loans that were not funded by the government. In 1935 the state of Indiana s General Assembly passed a law that provided student aid to students who had high test scores on their college entrance exams. This led to the formation of the Indiana State Financial Aid Association. or ISFAA, which was followed by the opening of the first Financial Aid office in Indiana University. Soon other colleges joined the ISFAA, and Indiana students had a new way to pay for school.

On October 4, 1957, Russia launched the first successful satellite into space. This had a huge impact on the history of financial aid in America, because the American government suddenly realized that they were in a race to put the first person in space. They realized that they only way to succeed in this race was to ensure that as many high school graduates as possible attended college, a feat which was out of the financial resources of many. With guidance from the ISFAA, the federal government created a working financial aid program.

After World War II, Congress passed the National Defense Education Act. This act introduced the Perkins Loan. a low-interest student loan that is provided to low-income students and has a 10-year repayment period. This was the first federally backed student loan, and more would soon follow. In 1963 the Health Education Assistance Act provided loans for students pursuing degrees in medical and health fields. This was followed by what is now known as the Federal Work-Study Program, a program that allows the federal government to pay the wages of working students.

By the end of 1965, Most of the student loan programs we use today, such as the Stafford Loan, Work-Study Program, and Perkins Loan, were in place. As the cost of education continued to rise, the government introduced the Parent s PLUS loan program in 1981, a program that allowed higher-income families to get assistance in paying for school. Today, these loan programs allow many students to pursue an education when they would otherwise be unable to, making them a valuable resource to our country as we strive to continue as a global leader.


http://ift.tt/1H70AAQ

School Grants.com - The Ultimate Grant Database

Figuring out how you are going to afford the high costs of higher education can be an intimidating prospect for anyone. However, you should not be dissuaded from furthering your education because you think you will not be able to afford the expense.

Instead, spend some time researching all of the financial aid or college grants you may qualify for; some of which may include federal school grants. Federal grants are a type of financial aid that you will not have to pay back after graduation, and can be used to cover any of the costs of attending college.

This type of financial aid is awarded solely based on the financial need of the student, especially looking at the Expected Family Contribution section of your Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA ) report; so make sure that you have completely and honestly completed your FAFSA application to have the best chance of receiving federal grants.

These grants are usually deposited into your student account, but can also be paid out to you by check or even deposited into your bank account. There are two types of federal student grants: the Pell Grant and the Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant (FSEOG).

Besides these two federal student grant programs, your college may have certain funds set aside as student college grants. To find out more information about this available source of financial aid, you will need to visit your school s financial aid office early and often. Most grant money is very limited and is distributed quickly, so complete your school s financial aid application as soon as possible.

The first step to receiving federal student aid of any kind is to fill out the FAFSA; in addition, most schools have their own financial aid forms you will need to complete to find out if you qualify for any local or private financial aid. As grant money is almost always reserved for students whose families demonstrate legitimate financial need, you may find that your own family s financial resources limit your eligibility for grant programs. In that case, it is important that you make use of all types of financial aid, including student loans and work-study.

Today student loans and financial aid are almost a given for college kids heading off to school. Few parents have the financial resources to pay all of the tuition for their children, and so most students fill out a FAFSA and apply for loans. This has not always been the case, however. Student loans are quite a modern invention.

The first recorded student loan program was developed by Harvard University in 1840. These early student loans were private loans that were not funded by the government. In 1935 the state of Indiana s General Assembly passed a law that provided student aid to students who had high test scores on their college entrance exams. This led to the formation of the Indiana State Financial Aid Association. or ISFAA, which was followed by the opening of the first Financial Aid office in Indiana University. Soon other colleges joined the ISFAA, and Indiana students had a new way to pay for school.

On October 4, 1957, Russia launched the first successful satellite into space. This had a huge impact on the history of financial aid in America, because the American government suddenly realized that they were in a race to put the first person in space. They realized that they only way to succeed in this race was to ensure that as many high school graduates as possible attended college, a feat which was out of the financial resources of many. With guidance from the ISFAA, the federal government created a working financial aid program.

After World War II, Congress passed the National Defense Education Act. This act introduced the Perkins Loan. a low-interest student loan that is provided to low-income students and has a 10-year repayment period. This was the first federally backed student loan, and more would soon follow. In 1963 the Health Education Assistance Act provided loans for students pursuing degrees in medical and health fields. This was followed by what is now known as the Federal Work-Study Program, a program that allows the federal government to pay the wages of working students.

By the end of 1965, Most of the student loan programs we use today, such as the Stafford Loan, Work-Study Program, and Perkins Loan, were in place. As the cost of education continued to rise, the government introduced the Parent s PLUS loan program in 1981, a program that allowed higher-income families to get assistance in paying for school. Today, these loan programs allow many students to pursue an education when they would otherwise be unable to, making them a valuable resource to our country as we strive to continue as a global leader.


http://loan.remmont.com/news/school_grants_com_the_ultimate_grant_database/2015-05-10-1323

Get Student Loans - How to Apply for Student Loans

FAFSA is the acronym given to the universal federal student aid application. It stands for Free Application for Federal Student Aid. Completing this application is necessary for consideration for loans, grants, and student worker programs. These forms change each year and are available in January.

*a) You can find and fill out the FAFSA online either through the university or college you plan on attending or on the federal government’s student aid website. If you need any help filling out your online application there are resources on the website as well.

Once you’ve gathered all the required documents and signed your application either with a PIN or your signature, submit your FAFSA for consideration. If you mail the application, you’ll have to wait almost two weeks before you can check its progress. If you e-file it you can check its progress almost immediately.


http://loan.remmont.com/news/get_student_loans_how_to_apply_for_student_loans/2015-05-09-1249