Famous-Speech

Today marks my one year vegan anniversary. It was a year ago today that I watched Gary Yourofsky’s famous speech and made the change right then. It has been such a life altering experience and it has given me a deep love and appreciation for food and animals alike. In celebration I enjoyed a frozen banana and raspberry blended treat, topped with soaked cashew pieces and fresh blackberries. Cheers and happy veganniversary to me.
#vegan #oneyear #anniversary #veganniversary #vegansofig #veganfoodporn #dessert #icecream #banana #nicecream #raspberry #berry #cashews #celebration #treat #veganfoodshare #foodporn #garyyourofsky #crueltyfree #delicious #recipe

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To my dear artistic, writerly, and wonderful followers,

Watch this video. Save it in your favorites. Keep it where you can always watch it, where you know you can find it.

This is Neil Gaiman’s famous ‘Make Good Art’ speech, the source of countless comics and infographics. It’s inspirational, funny, and straight from the heart.

Watch it, and keep it around.

It will save your art.

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June 18th 1940: Churchill’s ‘Finest Hour’ speech

On this day in 1940, the British Prime Minister Winston Churchill gave his famous 'Finest Hour’ speech in the House of Commons. The speech came at the end of the Battle of France during World War Two, after France had fallen to the forces of Nazi Germany. In this speech, Churchill called for Britain to prepare for its role in defending the world from the Nazis; he called for people to make this 'Darkest Hour’, after the fall of a key ally, into a 'Finest Hour’. After making the speech to the Commons, Churchill recorded it to be broadcast to the British people over the radio.

“the Battle of France is over. I expect that the Battle of Britain is about to begin…Hitler knows that he will have to break us in this Island or lose the war. If we can stand up to him, all Europe may be free and the life of the world may move forward into broad, sunlit uplands. But if we fail, then the whole world, including the United States, including all that we have known and cared for, will sink into the abyss of a new Dark Age made more sinister, and perhaps more protracted, by the lights of perverted science. Let us therefore brace ourselves to our duties, and so bear ourselves that, if the British Empire and its Commonwealth last for a thousand years, men will still say, 'This was their finest hour.’

Because I love History, I thought I should make a list of websites featuring awesome historical facts and resources. Will be updated.

So …Sherlock Holmes gets questioned “You and John Watson, just platonic?”

in the actual same building where Oscar Wilde was interrogated about his sexuality

and in response goes goes dead silent

while standing in the same courthouse

where Oscar Wilde gave a famous speech about the line “I am the love that dare not speak its name”

……………………………. in 1895

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March 5th 1946: ‘Iron Curtain’ speech

On this day in 1946, British Prime Minister Winston Churchill made his famous ‘Iron Curtain’ speech at Westminster College, Missouri. The term had been used prior to 1946, but this was the most public use of it. In the ‘Sinews of Peace’ address, Churchill used the term ‘iron curtain’ to reference a Soviet dominated Eastern Europe. At the time, the West still saw the Soviet Union as an ally after the defeat of Nazi Germany in World War Two, but Churchill’s speech heralded the onset of the Cold War tensions between the capitalist West and communist Russia. As the Cold War took hold, the phrase became popular as a reference to repressive Communist domination of Europe which hid Soviet actions and set a clear divide in Europe.

“From Stettin in the Baltic to Trieste in the Adriatic an iron curtain has descended across the continent”

No, but wait a fucking minute. Taylor ALWAYS complained about the “I made that bitch famous” line,  her grammy speech was literally about that line, and on Kim’s snapchat they don’t show that part. Therefore it’s true, Kanye never told her about that specific line.

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June 16th 1858: Lincoln’s ‘House Divided’ speech

On this day in 1858 in Springfield Illinois, Abraham Lincoln gave his famous ‘House Divided’ speech after receiving the Republican nomination for an Illinois Senate seat. The House Divided speech focused on the dangers posed by slavery to the Union and is one of future President Lincoln’s best known speeches. Lincoln then fought, unsuccessfully, against incumbent Democratic Senator Stephen Douglas for the seat. Douglas was a prominent politician, famed for his role in authoring the controversial Kansas-Nebraska Act of 1854. The campaign, especially the famous Lincoln-Douglas debates, rescued Lincoln from obscurity and set him on the path that would lead him to the White House in 1861. The election of a firmly anti-slavery candidate whose only support came from the North prompted the secession of the Southern states and the young nation soon descended into civil war.

A house divided against itself cannot stand. I believe this government cannot endure, permanently, half slave and half free. I do not expect the Union to be dissolved - I do not expect the house to fall - but I do expect it will cease to be divided. It will become all one thing or all the other”

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To my dear artistic, writerly, and wonderful followers,

Watch this video. Save it in your favorites. Keep it where you can always watch it, where you know you can find it.

This is Neil Gaiman’s famous ‘Make Good Art’ speech, the source of countless comics and infographics. It’s inspirational, funny, and straight from the heart.

Watch it, and keep it around.

It will save your art.

10

In 1997, Hilary Clinton made a famous speech in Beijing about women’s rights. Sadly many of the things she wanted to change are still a reality today. But what stood out for me the most was that only 30 per cent of her audience were male. How can we affect change in the world when only half of it is invited or feel welcome to participate in the conversation? Men, I would like to take this opportunity to extend your formal invitation. Gender equality is your issue, too. Because to date, I’ve seen my father’s role as a parent being valued less by society, despite my need of his presence as a child, as much as my mother’s. I’ve seen young men suffering from mental illness, unable to ask for help for fear it would make them less of a man. In fact, in the UK, suicide is the biggest killer of men between 20 to 49, eclipsing road accidents, cancer and coronary heart disease. I’ve seen men made fragile and insecure by a distorted sense of what constitutes male success. Men don’t have the benefits of equality, either. We don’t often talk about men being imprisoned by gender stereotypes, but I can see that they are, and that when they are free, things will change for women as a natural consequence. If men don’t have to be aggressive in order to be accepted, women won’t feel compelled to be submissive. If men don’t have to control, women won’t have to be controlled. Both men and women should feel free to be strong. It is time that we all see gender as a spectrum instead of two sets of opposing ideals. We should stop defining each other by what we are not and start defining ourselves by who we are. We can all be freer and this is what HeForShe is about. It’s about freedom. I want men to take up this mantle so their daughters, sisters and mothers can be free from prejudice but also so their sons have permission to be vulnerable and human, too and in doing so, be a more true and complete version of themselves. You might be thinking, “Who is this Harry Potter girl, and what is she doing speaking at the UN?” And, it’s a really good question. I’ve been asking myself the same thing. All I know is that I care about this problem, and I want to make it better. And, having seen what I’ve seen, and given the chance, I feel it is my responsibility to say something. Statesman Edmund Burke said, “All that is needed for the forces of evil to triumph is for good men and women to do nothing.” In my nervousness for this speech and in my moments of doubt, I told myself firmly, “If not me, who? If not now, when?” If you have similar doubts when opportunities are presented to you, I hope those words will be helpful. Because the reality is that if we do nothing, it will take seventy-five years, or for me to be nearly 100, before women can expect to be paid the same as men for the same work. 15.5 million girls will be married in the next 16 years as children. And at current rates, it won’t be until 2086 before all rural African girls can have a secondary education. If you believe in equality, you might be one of those inadvertent feminists that I spoke of earlier, and for this, I applaud you. We are struggling for a uniting word, but the good news is, we have a uniting movement. It is called HeForShe. I invite you to step forward, to be seen and to ask yourself, “If not me, who? If not now, when?” - Emma Watson HeForShe Speech at the United Nations [x]

“Agent Mulder – I’m standing out here in the mud and rain, looking at two empty coffins, in a cemetery where we dug up someone – something – I can’t explain… listening to a wacked-out kid tell me she’s going to die because she has ‘the marks.’ And at this point, it wouldn’t surprise me if we both started howling at the moon.”

Dana Scully, in the original script for “The X-Files” pilot

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June 26th 1963: JFK’s Berlin speech

On this day in 1963, at the height of the Cold War, US President John F. Kennedy addressed hundreds of thousands of people in West Berlin. He expressed US support of West Berlin following the building of the Berlin Wall by the Soviet-controlled East Germany. His appearance was greatly welcomed and gave the people of West Berlin a morale boost. Kennedy’s powerful rhetoric and delivery led many to call it one of his best speeches.

“All free men, wherever they may live, are citizens of Berlin, and, therefore, as a free man, I take pride in the words ‘Ich bin ein Berliner!’”

The Gettysburg Address

On June 1, 1865, Senator Charles Sumner commented on what is now considered the most famous speech by President Abraham Lincoln. In his eulogy on the slain president, he called it a “monumental act.” He said Lincoln was mistaken that “the world will little note, nor long remember what we say here.” Rather, the Bostonian remarked, “The world noted at once what he said, and will never cease to remember it. The battle itself was less important than the speech.”

Four score and seven years ago our fathers brought forth on this continent, a new nation, conceived in Liberty, and dedicated to the proposition that all men are created equal.  Now we are engaged in a great civil war, testing whether that nation, or any nation so conceived and so dedicated, can long endure. We are met on a great battle-field of that war. We have come to dedicate a portion of that field, as a final resting place for those who here gave their lives that that nation might live. It is altogether fitting and proper that we should do this.  But, in a larger sense, we can not dedicate – we can not consecrate – we can not hallow – this ground. The brave men, living and dead, who struggled here, have consecrated it, far above our poor power to add or detract. The world will little note, nor long remember what we say here, but it can never forget what they did here. It is for us the living, rather, to be dedicated here to the unfinished work which they who fought here have thus far so nobly advanced. It is rather for us to be here dedicated to the great task remaining before us – that from these honored dead we take increased devotion to that cause for which they gave the last full measure of devotion – that we here highly resolve that these dead shall not have died in vain – that this nation, under God, shall have a new birth of freedom – and that government of the people, by the people, for the people, shall not perish from the earth.