Faery Symbols

Holey Stones

A stone with a naturally formed hole though it. When peered into with one eye closed, you may see through glamours and obtain faery sight. Carry as a connection to the fae, good luck, or as a protection stone.

The Faery Star

The seven points of the faery star represent earth, air, fire, water, above, below and within. It has been used for protection, dreams, opening portals to the faery world, and a symbol of faery land. Be careful what you mark with it as it is very powerful, and sacred to the fae.

The Faery Cross

Said to be faery tears that fell to the ground and crystallised into Staurolite at the news of Christ’s death in one version, and faery tears caused by the destruction of nature, and an omen that iron machines and weapons would be used against the earth in another version. Carry for protection, dreamwork, grounding and anxiety.

The Faery Triad

Oak, Mountain Ash and Hawthorn. Three sacred faery trees, these plants have strong magic qualities. When bound or grown together they form a powerful protection, and when separate they attract fae and may aid one in opening a door to faeryland. Carry as an amulet, or for faery blessings and connection with the fae. Plant by your home to invite fae and provide a strong ward.

Fae vs. Fairy

Alright guys, let’s talk fae (the Celtic version).

There’s a terribly common misconception of what fae/fairy (and pixies) really means. On screen and sometimes even in books fairies are mistakenly shown to be those little winged creatures described as mischievous if not evil. That’s false. Those are actually pixies. The actual Fae (faerie, later fairy) are the mysterious nature spirits possessing magical powers, who look human-like but can also temporarily take up various smaller sizes upon choice.

But where do the Fae start? From the myths and folklore of the ancient Celts. The gods and goddesses of the Celts were many in number, and many unknown, but they were regarded with reverence, as having power and purpose, with various functions in the natural world. These gods were the Tuatha de Dannan, the people of Danu.

But with the arrival of Christianity, this changed, like most Celtic (and other non-Celtic) concepts. They were altered in meaning. Gods and deities of the old pagan ways were demoted to “fairy folk”, to heroes and remorseful warriors that change their faith, to lessen their power. Their pedestal of godhood and aura of mystery was strategically erased. They became enchanters, sorcerers, which obviously had evil connotations in Christian perception. In Daemonologie, King James associated fairies with demonic entities. Eventually even this imagery of the magical enchanters was further demoted to what is now most commonly known as that of the pixies: in other words, something small, harmless, powerless, a troublesome spirit that nobody cares to bother with anymore.

So in this sense, fae/faerie/faery refers to the ancient idea of what they stood for, the original one (gods, Tuatha de Dannan, powerful magical spirits); whereas fairy is the more modern one mistaken for pixies (small, harmless, mischievous).