European-tradition

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1800s Week!

Winslow Homer

Dressing for the Carnival

American (1877)

Oil on canvas

20 x 30 in. (50.8 x 76.2 cm), the Metropolitan Museum of Art

History of a European-African Tradition

Having visited Virginia as an artist-correspondent during the Civil War, Homer returned there at least once during the mid-1870s, apparently to observe what had happened to the lives of former slaves during the first decade of Emancipation. The brilliant light and color of this scene, originally titled “Sketch–4th of July in Virginia,” contradict its more solemn meaning.

The central figure is being dressed as Harlequin, the clown and social outcast of European comic theater. The strips of cloth being sewn to his costume, however, derive from African ceremonial dress and from the festival of Jonkonnu, when slaves left their quarters to dance at their master’s house.

In the years following the Civil War, aspects of Jonkonnu became part of the celebration of the Fourth of July and Emancipation. Here, the pageantry of multihued costumes suggests a festive celebration, but it also reflects the dislocation of traditional African culture and the beginnings of its transformation into a new tradition.

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The Brooklyn Museum is wrapping up its mid-career retrospective of artist Kehinde Wiley — which means 14 years of work and something like 60 paintings.

It’s been drawing a diverse and large crowd, partly because Wiley’s work has been featured on the TV show Empire, and partly because he is a well-known and, in some ways, controversial figure in the art world. Wiley takes contemporary figures — oftentimes young black men and women — and places them in old European art traditions: Oil paintings, portraits, stained glass and even bronze sculpture.

Wiley tells NPR’s Audie Cornish that the first time he stepped into a museum as a child, it was incredibly intimidating. “Great big paintings, history, gilded frames, a sense of power, a sense of majesty,” he says. “It was alienating but it was fabulous at the same time, because I was trying to learn how to paint. And here you had images where people had spent hundreds of years trying to figure out how to coax reality into form, and here it was.”

The Exquisite Dissonance Of Kehinde Wiley

Photo credits: (Top) Katherine Wetzel/Virginia Museum of Fine Arts/Copyright Kehinde Wiley (Left) Jason Wyche/Courtesy of Sean Kelly/Copyright Kehinde Wiley (Right) Courtesy of Galerie Daniel Templon, Paris/Copyright Kehinde Wiley (Bottom) Courtesy of the Brooklyn Museum/Copyright Kehinde Wiley

This is our myth. European men, British men, can look to the Lord of the Rings as a cyclical tale of eternal imperial might which has faced the men who call this continent home. We have faced Moors in Spain, Huns and Mongols from the East, Ottomans from the South and savages from all over the world trying to take our countries by force and to enslave our people, rape our women and murder our sons and daughters. But each time an Aragorn, a Theoden, an Arthur, Beowulf and Sigurd has emerged from among the men of the north and raised an army in defence of her borders. Each time the borders of our Europe are threatened, when orcs run rampant in our streets, when our old cities fall and the enemies without and within begin to openly declare their desire for us to be destroyed, wiped from the face of the earth, that is when a Leonidas, a Charles Martel, a Crusading Army, a Holy League arises and says enough.

A Product of Insomnia: “Seasons Beatings from Krampus” by -QRTW-



“…The most famous of these is the Krampus, a horned monster with one foot and one hoof…scaring children into being on their best behavior with the threats of being whipped with birch rods or, in extreme cases, being stuffed in a wicker basket and dragged off to hell.”
The European Tradition

In Europe, as elsewhere, people believed in witches. Witches were a normal part of everyday life for most people. If something went wrong, such as a cow dying or the butter failing to churn, it was due to witchcraft. People looked to their immediate neighbours to see who might be responsible.

During the fifteenth to the seventeenth centuries the Christian church claimed that witches were members…

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New witchcraft article on http://whitemagicwitch.com/the-european-tradition/

The European Tradition

In Europe, as elsewhere, people believed in witches. Witches were a normal part of everyday life for most people. If something went wrong, such as a cow dying or the butter failing to churn, it was due to witchcraft. People looked to their immediate neighbours to see who might be…

#Witchcraft #Pagan #Wicca #Magic #Spells