European-tradition

In Tangled and Tangled: The Series, Rapunzel is the sole heir to the crown as the only child of her father, Kind Frederic. Rapunzel’s position as a future queen seems to have raised many questions in the fandom. Because I’m a history enthusiast, I wanted to make some points clear for all fans and fanfiction writers.

Originally posted by disneyfeverdaily

Rapunzel will become a queen of her own right, a queen regnant. This means she will inherit her power and become the sovereign ruler of Corona. This differs greatly from her own mother, Queen Ariana. As king, King Frederic is the sovereign ruler of Corona. As his wife, Ariana is actually a queen consort, being the wife of a king. This means that Queen Ariana shares her husband’s rank and title but not his sovereign power. The series actually confirms this, as about all decisions this far have been made by Frederic alone; King came down hard on crime, King enacts a martial law that forbids Rapunzel from leaving Corona, King will decide what happens to Eugene after his confession to the queen…

But the biggest question in fandom seems to concern Eugene and his status after Rapunzel becomes queen. And no, he will not become a king. This is both a historical fact according to European tradition (while Corona is a fantasy land, it is definitely in Europe) and something Eugene himself points out at the end of Tangled, where he says that Rapunzel ruled her kingdom with wisdom and grace. Not they and their kingdom, Rapunzel and her kingdom.

Eugene becomes prince consort. This means that he will not have sovereign power. Husband of a queen is not called a king unless he has inherited sovereign right to rule himself. Husband of the queen will not share her rank and title. This is because of male primogeniture; male heirs are given privileges before females. King means a male ruler who has inherited his right to rule and so ideally, queen would actually be queen consort. However, Rapunzel is an only child so she will definitely become queen regnant instead. Eugene will not hold any royal power. Instead, he will most likely act as counsel and guide for his wife, Rapunzel.

Originally posted by dj066rapunz3l

I know it may seem strange for many fans that Eugene will not become king or hold any actual power. This is because traditionally, Western stories have loved to glorify male heroes by giving them power and titles. I don’t see many people wondering what Cinderella or Tiana will do after their princes become kings and I think that is because it’s just so easy to imagine a heroine as simply a wife but it’s harder to imagine a hero as simply a husband, with position depending completely on his partner. I personally take Tangled as a great opportunity to get used to and celebrate a heroine finally having power in her own right and becoming a great female ruler.

This has been some interesting historical and not so historical trivia for today. Rapunzel will become an amazing queen and Eugene will be there to support her all the way through.

As a sidenote, Rapunzel will never become Rapunzel Fitzherbert. Royalty in Europe do not need last names even today. And even so, Rapunzel is clearly higher in rank. It would be unwise to give up her father’s name after marriage as she will inherit his title and power. Actually, historically in such cases husbands could take their wife’s name instead. I think Eugene was either using his commoner thinking or simply making cute rhymes in Tangled Before Ever After when he sang about her becoming “Mrs Eugene Fitzherbert”. Modern fics are a different matter, of course. But taking your husband’s name is not the only way to be cute and romantic so I’m sure their marriage is just as sweet anyway.

anonymous asked:

Can you practice Hoodoo if you’re white? I have a very tiny history of black in my ancestry so I’m obviously not considering myself black, in native and white. But I’ve seen a lot of white Hoodoo practitioners and not so many voodoo or Vodoun (for obvious reasons). Since hoodoo is a practice and not a religion, is it closed off for only black people?

This is a question I get all the time and I’ve always been hesitant to answer. However, I think it’s time I do so. I guess I don’t understand why if you truly understood hoodoo, you’d want to practice it.

Hoodoo was created out of slavery, in attempt to protect and preserve ourselves. It is a blend of African magic and traditions, and Christianity because it was forced on us by our oppressors. A lot of true hoodoo is what the west (i.e. Wicca, high magick) would say is “dark” spells. Goofer dust, jack balls, hot foot powder were used against enemies yes, but that largely included white people.

If you do your research and you know what to look for several slave accounts and memoirs talk about “working the root” on their masters or some will talk about the “poisoning” of their masters, or finding a packet of sticks and herbs and people falling ill, some even dying.

The ingredients we use in hoodoo are practical because they HAD to be versatile. One did not buy honey for a jar, they just had it on hand. That’s why so much of hoodoo is dirt, herbs, sticks, and kitchen supplies like sugar and honey. It’s baffling to me why you’d be interested in a practice that was born out of protecting ourselves against the brutality of racism and colonialism. ESPECIALLY when there are so many European traditions that are folk too. That also use dirt. That also use bones and household goods. So why hoodoo? Why practice something born out of black resistance? Why call on a tradition and spirits colonialism tried its best to beat out of us?

Anyway this is the last time I’ll answer this question because I feel like it’s self explanatory. I can’t stop you from practicing no matter what your skin color is and I don’t wish to. However if you’re non black I invite you to truly ask yourself why you’re so interested in hoodoo specifically vs other non black traditions that probably use very similar things and approaches. I write all kind of spells, not just hoodoo, and invite anyone and everyone to use them. Folk magick is not exclusively hoodoo so there are plenty of other spells on my blog and tips that can be used (:

Self-Portrait by Panzhang Yuliang (潘张玉良). 1940.

Born Chen Xiuqing in 1895 in Jiangsu Province, this first Chinese woman to paint in the Western style was adopted by her uncle at the age of 14 after her parents’ death. The uncle renamed her Zhang Yuliang and sold her to a brothel. Eventually, she married Pan Zanhua and took on his family name in addition to her own; her new husband paid for her education, and Panzhang studied art in Shanghai, France, and Italy. After winning a Gold Prize at Roman International Art Exhibition, Panzhang returned to China to teach art and exhibit her work. Her artwork drew controversy: some felt that her images of nudes were too provocative, whilst others regarded her embracing of a European style as a sign of modernity. Panzhang moved back to Paris in 1937, where she would stay until her death in 1977. Today, she is remembered for her use of vivid color and soft forms, and the manner in which she blended Chinese and European traditions in her art.

Follow sinθ magazine for more daily posts about Sino arts and culture.

It is funny to me how many of these European nationalists want a traditional culture where all foreign and outside influence is banned and everyone lives in their Aryan village with maidens in wheatfields…but they still want fresh tomatoes in winter

anonymous asked:

Is it possible to get into how would someone train if they were to choose a staff as a weapon? In my story, I have a young girl that wants to learn basic self defense and staff training sounds plausible enough, I don't want her to be an absolute badass and she's just learning in case of an emergency. I hope this makes sense ):

You can gain sufficient skill with the staff to use it as a self-defense weapon within a few weeks. You won’t master it in a month, but it’s conceivable to fight with it. It is one of the fastest, simplest, and easiest weapons to learn. The most important thing she’ll need to remember to do is maintain her body’s conditioning (exercise) and keep her basic skills sharp (practice). Self-defense doesn’t work as a one off training and forget, it’s a situation where you either use it or lose it.

The holistic martial arts discipline where you progress through hand to hand to weapons combat is a mostly Eastern tradition in martial arts, this includes India. European tradition isn’t anywhere near as structured, you can start with the staff. Unlike other weapon types, staff training often begins with a real wooden staff, and if we’re going with European tradition then the weapon will most likely be made out of oak. Oak is heavy, heavy staves hurt when they hit you… a lot. You will get hit in training… a lot. In weapon’s training with a partner, we pay for our mistakes with bruises. Getting past the fear of being hit is one of the major components of this training type. Your partner’s weapon can easily slip, slide down the shaft, and hit your unprotected fingers. Learning how to stop that from happening is part of the training.

This is the truth of every weapon type in training: the weapon will punish you when you make mistakes with it. The more dangerous the weapon, the more detrimental the initial injuries.

The staff starts with deep bruises and, if you’re truly unlucky, broken bones (especially broken fingers). Broken collarbones are not outside the range of unusual. This is nothing compared to a weapon like the three sectioned staff where even beginner’s training can net you a concussion.

Unironically, the post I made recently about Nine Steps for Training Techniques applies to how we go about training on weapons. The staff has a straightforward basic move set, the strikes form a cross-shaped pattern across the body high (head) low (thigh) to low (thigh) high (head), then thrust to stomach, bring down on top of head or low the other way into the groin. When partnered with another human being, you practice these strikes together with one person performing the strikes and the other the blocks. The blocks for the staff are matching to the cross-shaped pattern, high low to low high, then bring the staff up horizontal to catch the strike to the top of the head, and a half step back from the thrust to knock it away with the tip of the staff. You can also bring the staff across the body to strike either side of the rib cage. A practiced staff user can shift between all these strikes without the pattern.

The staff is sized to the wielder, usually coming up to around their forehead rather than the top of the head. Your hands on the staff act like a fulcrum, redirecting as you go. You want your hands set wide enough to keep a solid, balanced, and controlled grip on the weapon while also providing you with the freedom to go at speed. This is difficult because your hands are going to want to naturally come together as you practice

The most important thing to remember about the staff is that both ends are weapons. Unless you’re gripping it by it’s bottom, one end is always going to be moving behind you. Most common staff injury when training is bruised knuckles. You can also break your fingers. When sparring with a heavy staff, you will be wearing pads and you will still get bruises. Those bruises may be deep, and sometimes go all the way down to the bone.

Never forget, your weapon senses your weakness. Soft defense leads to debilitating injury, even just in practice. You must be firm, fierce, focused, and unafraid of the pain you will inevitably receive. Learn to be stalwart. (Yes, this is a learned attitude and not one we start with.)

A weapon is never safe.

After practice, your arms will be tired due not just to moving but being on the receiving end of impact when the staves clash. There is no way to avoid this, you simply build resistance via experience. Learning how to keep hold of your staff in the middle of conflict that is trying to knock the weapon from them with each hit made by you or your enemy is necessary. Vibration will travel down the length of the staff to your hands, and that’s what you need to worry about wearing your arms out rather than weight.

Staves can and do break or fracture bones on impact when moving at speed, arms, legs, ribs, heads, feet, etc. They are bludgeoning weapons. When moving at speed in a practice bout, this can happen to you especially if you’re not wearing protection. (Wear protection.) This is not a gentle weapon or a soft one. It is useful too because of its range advantage over shorter weapons, but keep in mind that range means range. The closer the enemy comes, the less useful the staff gets. Your character is responsible for maintaining the fight range at which her weapon is useful. She’s going to need to get creative if the fight starts right next to her.

She’s gonna get her staff knocked out of her hands by whoever is instructing her the first few times because holding onto it does hurt a lot more than we anticipate when we start practicing defense. They’re going to teach her how to defend first though. You learn techniques then ratchet up at a steady pace to ferret out holes in defense.

It is natural for her to be nervous or even afraid of the weapon in the beginning, though she’ll overcome that. No one likes pain, and pain is an unavoidable side effect of weapon’s training. Hand to hand works it’s way up to basic injuries, but weapon’s will nail you coming and going. We’ll hit ourselves, our partner will hit us, we’ll make mistakes, and we pay for them. Usually, it’s just bruises.

There are, of course, stances and footwork associated with staff training but that’s ironically more complex than it needs to get right now.

For endurance training with the staff, outdoors on a variety of terrain is helpful. This includes beaches, on uneven terrain, in forests, in fields, in rivers, etc. All these will help the student learn to navigate different terrain and learn the detriments of fighting in various environments. They also build strength. Sand and water will both sap away strength due to the focus required to maintain balance on soft surfaces and water’s resistance/drag when it comes to movement. They may also teach her how to fight on stairs.

Staff training will provide her with the base necessary to move on to polearms like spears or even some swords if she wants to in the future. Staves with their heads and butts shod in iron as a defense against blades (and extra damage) were also common.

Due to this being self-defense, the focus of her training is going to be on using her staff to create escape opportunities rather than engaging in prolonged conflict.

For more on this topic, you can check out our staff training tag.

-Michi

This blog is supported through Patreon. If you enjoy our content, please consider becoming a Patron. Every contribution helps keep us online, and writing. If you already are a Patron, thank you.

2

(Watching) the lighting of Easter (bon)fires on Easter Sunday (or Easter Monday) is an old custom in parts of Europe. 

It is a custom to lit the Easter Bonfire in the Northwest European countries, the Netherlands, (Northern) Germany, Denmark, parts of Sweden, Finland, but also in Austria and Switzerland.  

In the Netherlands this year the highest Easter (bon)fire measured about 20 meters high (according to the contest).

Watching such an Easter (bon)fire burning at sundown is quite an experience. Even at a safe distance you can feel the warmth and hear the cracks of the fire. And the smell of burned wood (fo example christmas trees) transpire through the houses hours afterwards. Even if you live miles and miles away from the bonfire.    

Breathing Life

Dolls and poppets are utilized across many faiths, however often witches neglect to “breath life” into them. Not doing so doesn’t make them wholly ineffective, however going the extra step really amps up the potency, especially when using it as sympathetic magic or creating a protective being! It’s a relatively simple step, but highly dependent upon which path you follow. I’ll briefly cover my methodology.

Foremost, I would like to specify the difference between the two types of dolls I utilize. One being sympathetic magic, the one most often thought of when people think of dolls and witchcraft. Voodoo dolls. This is a misnomer, as the common portrayal off voodoo dolls in media have skewed the original purpose of such dolls. Originally the dolls were used by practitioners not to affect people, but as a guide to the sufferers ailments and treatments – more akin to a “medical chart.” However, they have since (and really, in European magical traditions for centuries) been used to heal or harm a specific victim in which the doll was made to their likeness. This is a sympathetic doll, made in their likeness, usually incorporating some sort of personal affect (hair, clothing, blood, etc.).

The second type, and the kind I most often use, are dolls not based on any individual, but instead exist to act as a guardian of sorts or facilitate change/growth/health/etc. These are unique and very much a product of your imagination. Create them to be whatever you see fit.

That being said, let’s begin;;

Sympathetic Dolls: Begin by first, stitching the doll together in the likeness of he/she you wish to influence. You can be as general or as specific as you want – matching hair, eyes, facial features, build are all common concepts. Traditionally the dolls were stuffed with Spanish Moss (most probably due to the abundance in the American South) however you can stuff it with anything you have on hand. If you have anything of the persons, now would be the time to use it, hair can be wrapped and stuffed in the doll, pieces of their clothes can be folded and placed inside, blood should be on a scrap of cloth, dried and then added.

Once the doll is complete and you’re satisfied with its image (in truth, dolls have been made out of anything and everything, the only crucial step is the following), you must give it life. For sympathetic dolls, this can be as simple or difficult as you wish. I prefer to take the simple route and sit with the doll and focus intently on the person you wish to connect to it. I then mentally stitch the spirit of the person to the doll (either at the heart or at the feet – as a short of shadow). Vocalize your intent and revel in your creation.

Conceptual Dolls/Guardians: These are my personal favorites to create, in all honesty. I find poppets to be a lot of extra work, however they are useful in remote healing/hexing. These, as I mentioned, are beings of your thoughts. Tulpas, in a way. Begin by gathering your materials and ideas. Create a doll to symbolize whatever you wish to accomplish. As far as this tutorial goes, I’ll use the example of a Guardian or a doll for protection. It can look however you wish, and be as simple as sticks tied together, to the most intricately created doll you could muster. I, personally, stick with a small doll (no bigger than 8 or 10 inches) with yarn hair, simple clothing and a painted face. I often stuff mine with herbs associated with my will, as well as batting and sometimes stray scraps of fabric.

After your doll is complete, take it to the Crossroads. It can be a door, a gate (I use the gate of a remote cemetery near me), a cemetery, even a maternity ward if you’re that committed and light a candle. Fill your mind with intention, then connect with the energy of your crossroads. Feel the planes converge, and bend this erratic energy to your will, funneling it through your consciousness and into your doll. See the energy shape, bend, coalesce into a being of your intent and give it a Name, as there is much power in a Name. Connect its energy to our physical plane by allowing it refuge within the fabric of the doll you have created. Leave a gift at the Crossroads, and blow out your candle, sealing in the doll’s spirit. Use it as you desire, but do not neglect it.

Thus ends this tutorial!

Best of luck,

Q

King Arthur: Legend of the Sword is a random heavy-fantasy retelling of the Sword in the Stone? Seems silly, right? 

Wrong! 

It’s a Guy Ritchie film and you can feel that – there are there fun sections of dialogue and visual pacing where it’s got this fast, fun, gangster movie runaround feel that Snatch did so well. Then the next minute it’s high-fantasy LOTR dramatic and monsters and mages? Then the next minute you’re watching these amazing fight and battle sequences that are killer and fun and just really stylish! Charlie Hunnam’s King Arthur is like… Aragorn if Aragon had Jax Teller’s upbringing. Which is exactly the vibe I think they cast him for and it really works?

It contains in no particular order:

- Excellent sound track 

- Amazing fight choreography 

- The most badass take on Excalibur I’ve ever seen

- A very compelling villain in Jude Law

- No romance sub-plot

- POCs very purposely cast into traditional European fantasy roles (like you can see them going, lol fuck you. It’s canon. Your fave is POC now) 

- Really unique interpretations of fantasy characters with no shying away from the magic and creature-feature stuff

- A really cool fucking world that leaves you really wanting more and wishing this was an HBO series and not a movie

So I highly recommend it. That’s what I’m saying. Someone watch this and talk to me about it.

anonymous asked:

Hi! Could you suggest some music in Catalan? Old or modern I don't mind ^^ thanks

Sure! We have a lot of good music imho. I tried to break it down to music genres more or less

Classics (1960s “Nova Cançó” movement)

Modern music

Pop

Rock

Rap and Ska (most of my personal faves)

Rumba (very very popular among young people)

Inspired by traditional music and/or actual traditional songs

Musical theatre

You’ll find better quality audios on Spotify :)

Woah I just realised I got carried away and made a huge list hehe… well, everyone should be able to find something they like.

I hope you enjoy it!

Source

International Workers’ Day

“International Workers’ Day, also known as Labour Day in some countries,  is a celebration of labourers and the working classes that is promoted by the international labour movement, socialists, communists, and anarchists which occurs every year on May Day (1 May), an ancient European spring festival. [4] The date was chosen for International Workers’ Day by the Second International, a pan-national organization of socialist and communist political parties, to commemorate the Haymarket affair, which occurred in Chicago on 4 May 1886. The 1904 International Socialist Conference in Amsterdam, the Sixth Conference of the Second International, called on “all Social Democratic Party organisations and trade unions of all countries to demonstrate energetically on the First of May for the legal establishment of the 8-hour day, for the class demands of the proletariat, and for universal peace." 

Being a traditional European spring celebration, May Day is a national public holiday in several European countries. The date is currently celebrated specifically as "Labour Day” or “International Workers’ Day” in the majority of countries, including those that didn’t traditionally celebrate May Day. Some countries celebrate a Labour Day on other dates significant to them, such as the United States, which celebrates Labor Day on the first Monday of September.”