Ethnic-Differences

4

[Katana] means so much, because it’s very off putting when an actor of a different Asian ethnicity plays a Japanese character, especially if the movie is going to be aired in that country. Growing up I realised that we really don’t have that many Asian actresses, models, or people that make public appearances on TV in Hollywood. Every Halloween I would have such a struggle dressing up as something because I would always feel so fake, like, “What superhero can I be? What Disney princess can I be?” I was so limited.

anonymous asked:

I think I saw a post on your blog that showed the different ethnicities of Asian culture, do you have a link to that post or can you tell me yourself? I'm just being curious since only mainstream media show East Asians and I want to learn more about the different backgrounds. Thanks and I hope you're having a nice day!

hello there! here is the post, which puts things a lot better than i ever could. :)

laharl25  asked:

How much of Pogo's sex drive is from what he he imagines sex to be like vs. his actual experiences? Or is it his demon driving that hot rod? Would like to see him get lucky so we can see his reactions and feelings...

I think it stems more from what he imagines and what he wants than from what he’s actually experienced.  I’m not saying that he’s never had any actual experiences, or that he’s only had bad experiences.  It’s one of those things where we’re going to have to hear it from his own mouth. ;)

As for his demon’s role in it… If Pogo’s mother is right about him being half human and half demon, I see this mix as being more like the mix you’d get from two parents of different ethnicities.  I can look at a friend or family member who’s mixed and say, “he obviously gets his skin color from his dad, and some of his facial features are clearly his mom’s, and sometimes he talks just like his dad or acts just like his mom.” etc.  But in the end, regardless of who it came from, ALL of it is *him.*

anonymous asked:

I'm just being curious and I want to learn about the different ethnicities of Korean culture. Do you know a post you can reference for me or can you talk about them yourself? Thank you and I hope you're having a nice day!

hi xx

i’m sorry if i misunderstood your question. i didn’t get the exact definition of different ethnicities of korean culture. but i did my best to answer the message, and if i’m wrong, you can send me another one with more details xxx

so… it’s quite complicated to answer. korea is in east asia and since other countries like china, japan and mongolia have been fighting communicating with us for a very long time, it’s scientifically obvious that korea is a multinational country. my genes must contain at least 0.05% japanese thing?  however, no one in my country consider that deeply. I think most of people wouldn’t know where their ancestors first came from. because… i don’t know, because it could be like 1500 ~ 500 years ago? when you’re koreans who have korean parents, most of you think you are koreans. just koreans. you never consider your old ancestors are actually chinese.

so korea might be a multinational country in a scientific way, but the way most of people think and accept is not different from people in homogeneous countries. it kinda explains why it’s so hard for me to understand what different ethnicities means because we are homogeneous afalso many text books say it’s a homogeneous country. even wiki does. they consider korean itself as one ethnic group. that’s actually wrong but even many koreans think exactly the same. (also we don’t look like chinese or japanese etc. in asians’ eyes, we all look slightly different. no wonder we think we are independant.)

of course, things are changing. more and more south east asian women come to marry korean men (which isn’t…good at all because those men are almost buying those women), and some people from different countries, even western countries are moving to here. but still, there are few of them and people conceive them as just foreigners, especially if they are not east asians. since more and more diverse races are coming to here, people in my country should be fucking aware of racism and colorism we can see in daily life. (you would understand exactly what i mean if you are a kpop fan. teasing south east asians and black people’s skin, saying they prefer white skin in tv show etc)

i don’t know… was this answer helpful? i’m kinda worried that i might answered the completely different question, sorry xxxx

But ethnotheories are distinct enough, at least to an outsider, that they are apparent in the smallest details. In other words, your most personal observations of your child are actually cultural constructions. In a study conducted by Harkness and her international colleagues, American parents talked about their children as intelligent and even as “cognitively advanced.” (Also: rebellious.)

Italian parents, though, very rarely praised their children for being intelligent. Instead, they were even-tempered and “simpatico.” So although both the Americans and the Italians noted that their children asked lots of questions, they meant very different things by it: For the Americans, it was a sign of intelligence; for the Italians, it was a sign of socio-emotional competence. The observation was the same; the interpretation was radically different.

Every society interprets its children in its own way: The Dutch, for example, liked to talk about long attention spans and “regularity,” or routine and rest. (In the Dutch mind, asking lots of questions is a negative attribute: It means the child is too dependent.) The Spanish talked about character and sociality, the Swedes about security and happiness. And the Americans talked a lot about intelligence.

2

[Katana] means so much, because it’s very off putting when an actor of a different Asian ethnicity plays a Japanese character, especially if the movie is going to be aired in that country. Growing up I realised that we really don’t have that many Asian actresses, models, or people that make public appearances on TV in Hollywood. Every Halloween I would have such a struggle dressing up as something because I would always feel so fake, like, “What superhero can I be? What Disney princess can I be?” I was so limited.

Diversity in media is about more than just bodies. For example, it would be very exciting to have a team of women of different ethnicities and body types, but it would be less cool if the thin white beautiful one is the main character with a romantic subplot, the fat black one is the comedic side kick, and the butch muscular one is the silent fighting type that kicks ass. Not all bodies are stereotyped the same even if they are the same gender.

Having a fat black love interest is just as radical a role for a woman as having a woman be the scientist (or whatever role it is now that we are trying to encourage girls to pursue). Getting to be adored and admired for your ethereal beauty is not a universal female character thing, it is a role reserved for women with very specific types of bodies.

10

What is Back?

The Negrito are several ethnic groups who inhabit isolated parts of Southeast Asia. Their current populations include Andamanese peoples of the Andaman Islands, Semang peoples of Malaysia, the Mani of Thailand, and the Aeta, Agta, Ati, and 30 other groups of the Philippines.

The Negrito peoples show strong physical similarities with some African populations, but are genetically closer to south-east Asian populations. They may be descended from ancient Australoid-Melanesian settlers of Southeast Asia, or represent an early split from the southern coast migrants from Africa.

The appropriateness of using the label ‘Negrito’ to bundle together peoples of different ethnicity based on similarities in stature and complexion has been challenged.

Some studies have suggested that each group should be considered separately, as the genetic evidence refutes the notion of a specific shared ancestry between the “Negrito” groups of the Andaman Islands, the Malay Peninsula, and the Philippines

We have, however, recently investigated the position in the global mtDNA phylogeny of complete genome sequences of eight haplogroups found primarily in the Malay Peninsula, showing that most of them branch directly from the Eurasian mtDNA ancestor lineages ~60,000 years ago and are indigenous and unique to the Peninsula (Macaulay et al. 2005)
Current genetic evidence is beginning to highlight more recent relationships between negrito populations and other, non-negrito populations in the same region, while maintaining some evidence for deeper genetic roots of these populations (Barik et al. 2008; Chaubey and Endicott this issue). These deep lineages may not reflect a common ancestry concurrent with the dispersal out of Africa, as predicted by the negrito hypothesis, but a degree of long-term genetic isolation from neighboring populations. The first study to integrate genotype and phenotype data of a negrito population (Migliano et al. this issue) suggests that, based on genetic variation, the Aeta, Batak, and Agta cluster with other South Asian populations and that their small body size evolved independently of other pygmy populations in Africa or Papua New Guinea.

Four Y chromosome haplogroups C, D, O and N, accounted for more than 90% of the East Asian Y chromosomes, are suggested to have Southeast Asian origins, carried by three waves of migrations

Space the final frontier.

Can we just talk about this for a second.

Not only does Star Trek feature many actors of different races,like Sulu and Uhara. (Other characters are played by actors of different ethnicities as well like Krall and Keenser but you can’t tell.)It features people of the LGBTQ+ community as well, like Sulu and his husband Ben who have a daughter together on Starbase Yorktown.

Star Trek gives women strong roles as well. Like Uhara, Jaylah, and Commodore Paris. Jaylah, who was torn from her family and forced to survive on her own, is never once remarked as being weak. Kirk tells her he needs her to survive. Jaylah is also portrayed by Algerian actress Sofia Boutella.

The crew upon the USS Enterprise aren’t all one species either. Not only is the crew from different countries and races and sexual orientations, but they are a united fleet of beings from all across the universe and I think that is such a beautiful thing.

Star Trek is one of those franchises that has always had diversity. Always. Even when no one else did. For that I am so grateful.

Live long and prosper. 🖖

10

What is Back?

The Negrito are several ethnic groups who inhabit isolated parts of Southeast Asia. Their current populations include Andamanese peoples of the Andaman Islands, Semang peoples of Malaysia, the Mani of Thailand, and the Aeta, Agta, Ati, and 30 other groups of the Philippines.

The Negrito peoples show strong physical similarities with some African populations, but are genetically closer to south-east Asian populations. They may be descended from ancient Australoid-Melanesian settlers of Southeast Asia, or represent an early split from the southern coast migrants from Africa.

The appropriateness of using the label ‘Negrito’ to bundle together peoples of different ethnicity based on similarities in stature and complexion has been challenged.

Some studies have suggested that each group should be considered separately, as the genetic evidence refutes the notion of a specific shared ancestry between the “Negrito” groups of the Andaman Islands, the Malay Peninsula, and the Philippines

We have, however, recently investigated the position in the global mtDNA phylogeny of complete genome sequences of eight haplogroups found primarily in the Malay Peninsula, showing that most of them branch directly from the Eurasian mtDNA ancestor lineages ~60,000 years ago and are indigenous and unique to the Peninsula (Macaulay et al. 2005)
Current genetic evidence is beginning to highlight more recent relationships between negrito populations and other, non-negrito populations in the same region, while maintaining some evidence for deeper genetic roots of these populations (Barik et al. 2008; Chaubey and Endicott this issue). These deep lineages may not reflect a common ancestry concurrent with the dispersal out of Africa, as predicted by the negrito hypothesis, but a degree of long-term genetic isolation from neighboring populations. The first study to integrate genotype and phenotype data of a negrito population (Migliano et al. this issue) suggests that, based on genetic variation, the Aeta, Batak, and Agta cluster with other South Asian populations and that their small body size evolved independently of other pygmy populations in Africa or Papua New Guinea.

Four Y chromosome haplogroups C, D, O and N, accounted for more than 90% of the East Asian Y chromosomes, are suggested to have Southeast Asian origins, carried by three waves of migrations

rxdeasf  asked:

Hola. Considering that you are taking requests, would to be too much to ask for an interracial relationship au. Mainly because interracial relationships aren't really represented much in K-pop, which is a shame. Starring either bae - Sehun or Baekhyun. I don't have a particular scenario in mind, but Angst/Fluff preferably (cause angst is life) THANK YOU, for taking the time to read this and have a great day!!!

hi there~~ thanks for requesting ^^ sooooo since i got two very similar requests which mentions baekkie, i’ll just write this one with baekhyun :D

baekhyun dating a foreigner

  • byun baekhyun is such a sweetheart; he would hate it if you were self-conscious about your race or your appearance
  • he would always be trying to make you feel better and comfortable about being yourself and being different
  • whatever ethnicity you are, he would really want to learn more about your background and whatever culture you had grown up with
  • if you spoke another language, baekhyun would always nag you about teaching him words, pointing at random objects and making you say it in your language and cutely trying to imitate you
  • he would want to learn more about your culture, but he’d also want to teach you about his, patiently explaining things and helping you speak korean too ^^
  • he would make sure to make the process fun so that you don’t get too frustrated or discouraged during it
  • taking you to eat alllll of his favorite foods and if the two of you ever get to visit your home country, you’ll repay the favor for him 
  • when you get frustrated or angry, you start swearing in your native tongue and he gets a bit wary like “i hope you’re not cursing me out rn”
  • calling you beautiful when you stare a little too long at yourself in the mirror
  • wanting to call you a pet name in your native language hehe 
  • (i’m just gonna add this in but honestly, none of the exo boys would be against dating a foreigner bc if they love you, they love you. period.)

Lately I’ve been getting frustrated at work because my co workers (and customers!) will poke fun at my ethnicity. I’m Vietnamese and darker (and on the chubbier side) and I’ve been constantly mistaken for different ethnicities. I’ve gotten it from Vietnamese customers too, especially when I start speaking Vietnamese to help them out and they go in this shocked trance. There was once this white man that came to me while I was at register and started to mockingly speak Spanish to me!!! (There was so much wrong with that on so many different levels it was disgusting) I think what most bothered me was the fact I’ve gotten comments like “You look too dark to be Vietnamese!” and that just makes me really sad. 

This is for all the anons who have an issue with the idea that white Jews have white privilege. I’m a black Jew. I’ve been around Jews of all different ethnicities and it’s only recently that I’ve seen this idea that white Jews aren’t white- and tbh, that rubbed me the wrong way. Because although they experience a form of racism, and definitely experience antisemitism, white Jews perpetuate that onto Jews of other ethnicities and races. My family is made up of Black Jews from Spain and Morocco and the West Indies, always has been as far as I know, but my grandparents were not allowed in the synagogues because they were black. People ask me which of my parents is Jewish, with the assumption that one of my parents has to be white. When I go to the JCC, the white Jews there assumed that I was there to play basketball. A synagogue that I attended for years full of black and Sephardic Jews didn’t feel that they were truly a synagogue because they didn’t have the validation of a white rabbi. And that’s just my experience: I know plenty of other black Jews who simply left Judaism because they didn’t feel like they belonged. Because they never felt like they belonged. Because white Jews wouldn’t welcome them into the fold. And this is not just American white Jews either- the white Jews in Israel are just as bad. So don’t act like there is no privilege from being a white (or white passing, whatever y'all want to call yourselves) Jew. A lot of y'all wanna pull the ‘well we’re not white’ card when people want to check you but then you guys will be quick to question someone and their background if they aren’t white. And just because some Jews of color were willing to tell you what you wanted to hear about your struggle doesn’t let you off the hook. Check your privilege.

My inbox is always open if you want to dispute this.

tododorky  asked:

Alright but the voltron kids being different ethnicities also brings a lot of chaos, like imagine Pidge got really mad at Lance for touching their tech, told Keith that 'feo' means courageous and strong in spanish and watches from afar as Keith walks right up to Lance and calls him feo. Lance choking back tears and runs to go tell Shiro, and Pidge goes n takes a nap

KJALKJXFF FEO, keith shouts some angry korean words towards him (i like to think he is) and lance starts going off in spanish and its the worst day of everyone’s lives 

10

What is Back?

The Negrito are several ethnic groups who inhabit isolated parts of Southeast Asia. Their current populations include Andamanese peoples of the Andaman Islands, Semang peoples of Malaysia, the Mani of Thailand, and the Aeta, Agta, Ati, and 30 other groups of the Philippines.

The Negrito peoples show strong physical similarities with some African populations, but are genetically closer to south-east Asian populations. They may be descended from ancient Australoid-Melanesian settlers of Southeast Asia, or represent an early split from the southern coast migrants from Africa.

The appropriateness of using the label ‘Negrito’ to bundle together peoples of different ethnicity based on similarities in stature and complexion has been challenged.

Some studies have suggested that each group should be considered separately, as the genetic evidence refutes the notion of a specific shared ancestry between the “Negrito” groups of the Andaman Islands, the Malay Peninsula, and the Philippines

We have, however, recently investigated the position in the global mtDNA phylogeny of complete genome sequences of eight haplogroups found primarily in the Malay Peninsula, showing that most of them branch directly from the Eurasian mtDNA ancestor lineages ~60,000 years ago and are indigenous and unique to the Peninsula (Macaulay et al. 2005)
Current genetic evidence is beginning to highlight more recent relationships between negrito populations and other, non-negrito populations in the same region, while maintaining some evidence for deeper genetic roots of these populations (Barik et al. 2008; Chaubey and Endicott this issue). These deep lineages may not reflect a common ancestry concurrent with the dispersal out of Africa, as predicted by the negrito hypothesis, but a degree of long-term genetic isolation from neighboring populations. The first study to integrate genotype and phenotype data of a negrito population (Migliano et al. this issue) suggests that, based on genetic variation, the Aeta, Batak, and Agta cluster with other South Asian populations and that their small body size evolved independently of other pygmy populations in Africa or Papua New Guinea.

Four Y chromosome haplogroups C, D, O and N, accounted for more than 90% of the East Asian Y chromosomes, are suggested to have Southeast Asian origins, carried by three waves of migrations

anonymous asked:

To the anon who wants to cosplay a poc character from overwatch, as a poc I think it's fine if you're a white person who wants to cosplay a poc as long as you don't do anything to make yourself look like a different ethnicity (ex: painting your skin a different color or making your eyes look different) as long as you're respectful about it, it should be fine and if anyone hates on it well it's their problem

Passing this along ~

The legend of a romantic relationship between king Casimir and the Jewish girl Esther was very popular among Polish Jews. Photo: A painting by Władysław Łuszkiewicz, “Casimir the Great Visiting Esther” from the collection of Lviv National Art Gallery.

■ Today almost mono-ethnic and predominantly Catholic Poland was once a multi-cultural polity, inhabited by Poles, Ukrainians, Belarusians, Lithuanians, Jews, Tatars, Armenians and Germans.

■ The Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth, as it was called from the 16th to the late 18th century, was one of the earliest confederate countries in early modern Europe. For a long time, it also boasted a tolerant policy towards different ethnicities and faiths.

■ This led to a massive influx of Jews fleeing persecution in the countries of Western Europe as early as the late 15th century. Within a short time, Poland became the biggest area of Jewish settlement, a homeland to the blooming Yiddish civilization of the Ashkenazi Jews.

■ During the Reformation, Polish tolerance also contributed greatly to the country becoming a safe harbour for members of protestant churches. One of the most illustrious examples of their splendid role was the activity of the so-called Polish Brethren, a protestant church, whose members opposed social privileges and refused military service, becoming one of the earliest pacifist movements in history, impacting, in this respect, later philosophers like John Locke. (source: culture.pl)

C For the past eight years I have been living in a home with a white couple, their daughter, and my biological sister. Before that I was in many different foster homes with caretakers of different ethnicities from my own. I am the daughter of a couple from the war torn country of Sudan. Though I am fifteen now I am still able to look back on memories from I was the age of two. Most people would say the reason being is due to past-trauma, but i was the happiest when with my true family.

anonymous asked:

Dude you seriously need to stop. I am black and Asian - my dad is from PNG and my mom is from China. I totally think that there should be diversity in character casting, but that doesn't mean that we have to go and cast next to every character as a POC. That isn't diversity. Diversity is having people of all different ethnicities. Get off your high horse and stop acting like such a no it all about matters like these. You are white, so stop speaking for POC as if your opinion is the right one.

I never once said that I have any input in issues like these, I’m white, as we all know, but that doesn’t mean that I can’t speak out about these issues. I can see the issues in media surrounding POC and although I cannot speak for POC as I’m not one, it doesn’t mean I can’t support them and want there to be more diversity which brings me onto my second point.

I also never once said that every character had to be POC. I said, in the first post, how important diversity is ‘There should be diversity, people from all different ethnic backgrounds, cultures, sexualities, genders and religions (and so forth).’ I literally said mutliple times about having multiple people from different cultures, ethnic backgrounds etc so I’m confused about your message at this part as I did in fact address diversity and never once said ‘every character needs to be POC’.

Thirdly, I’m white, I’ve never had to experience what POC go through, I’ve never not been represented, I’m privileged as hell in those senses. I don’t know everything. How can I know everything? I’m an 18 year old white girl, I don’t know a lot of stuff, especially what POC go through but I never claimed to know everything about everyone and their situation. The point of that post was about diversity, about including more ethnic groups, more sexualities, more shapes and sizes, more religions and more POC in media; that was the point, I never once claimed to be a ‘know it all’ and I’m definitely not on my high horse. I’m just expressing that there should be more diversity in media.

I am sorry if it caused offence and I’m in no way arguing with you - I can’t choose what offends people - but I wanted to clear those things up since I had mentioned things like that and I was never claiming to know everything. People can agree and disagree with my views and that’s okay but I’m not claiming my opinion is the right one, just as I’m not claiming to know everything. idk i needed to clear that up 

"I just saw a shocking post that fills me with rage.”

1. Fact check. 

Especially with the news. Is the thing you learned from a credible source? Take a few minutes to google if it’s real first before hitting reblog. 

If you want to add your own voice into the mix, keep reading. 

2. Type up your response and save it as draft. 

Wait at least 2 hours, until you’re no longer filled with rage. Read it again. Are you positively contributing to the discourse and educating the masses? Or are you here to attack people?

3. Are you “White Knighting”?

Are you speaking for yourself, or for other people? Don’t speak for people of a different social group if they never asked you to. 

Be careful when using blanket terms such as “POC” when talking about ideologies, because people of different ethnicities may have very different attitude towards issues like culture or race. (eg. First Nations are often very vocally against cultural appropriation, but many Asian ethnicities are happy to spread their culture around.) 

Even if you do belong to a certain social group, you cannot represent everyone within that group. 

4. Are you waiting for people to confirm your bias?

Or are you looking to convince and educate people who disagrees with you? 

5. Post it or delete it.