Eruption

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Timelapse view of lava moving on the plains near Pu’u O’o, Hawaii. The hill in the distance is called the “Pali”, it is the mark of a large normal fault created by part of the island sliding out towards the sea. Lava cascades over the Pali on its way to the ocean during the eruption. This is substantially sped up from how fast Pahoehoe lava typically flows.

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Powerful Volcanic Eruptions on Earth - 5 Best Footage Compilations 2017

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Close up view of the lava tube chopped open during the recent lava delta collapse, now pouring lava almost directly into the Pacific - surrounded by exploding lava debris.

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Classic video of Katia Kraft - volcanologist who traveled the world visiting eruptions and eventually was killed in a pyroclastic flow in Japan. This lava flow was at Katla volcano, Iceland. 

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Pahoehoe lobes inflate and occasionally a small new lobe breaks out, timelapse view, on the edge of the active lava fields, Hawaii. This clip is probably 5-10x faster than real time. This lava is over 1100 degrees C. It cools rapidly at the surface when exposed to air, then that crust is broken through and refolded by the lava flowing underneath to create the folded, ropy pahoehoe texture you see on top.

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The Indonesian Volcano Sinabung was extremely active last week, sending up several clouds of ash. That ash used to be magma that was in tact in its neck, but gases in that magma fractured it into ash. During the eruption, super-heated gases and ash mix together and rise upwards because the combination of ash and hot gas is still denser than the atmosphere. However, when it zooms in look for the small areas of ash that seem like they’re falling off the side. These are small pyroclastic flows coming off the main ash cloud. They form when part of the ash cloud becomes too dense - either too much ash or becomes too cold. They are still several hundred degrees C and begin moving down the volcano in channels - these are the parts of an eruption like this that can damage and kill.

Johan Christian Dahl (1788-1857)
“Eruption of Vesuvius” (1826)
Romanticism

Mount Vesuvius is a volcano located on the Gulf of Naples in Campania, Italy, about 9 km (5.6 mi) east of Naples. It is best known for its eruption in AD 79 that led to the burying and destruction of the Roman cities of Pompeii, Herculaneum, and several other settlements.

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Panorama over the active crater rim, Mt. Bromo, Indonesia