Eric-Shiner

022: Eric Shiner

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Tell Me Something I Don’t Know is Boing Boing’s podcast featuring artists, writers, filmmakers, and other creative people discussing their work, ideas, and the practical side of how they do what they do. In episode 22, we speak to Eric Shiner, Director of the Andy Warhol Museum in Pittsburgh, PA.

“To Give Voice to Those That Don’t Have It” and “Making the Anomalies of Society Into the Paradigms of Society” are among his responsibilities as the museum’s director. Over the past twenty years, Andy Warhol’s popularity has soared. Shiner talks with us about Warhol’s legacy, about exhibiting the museum’s collection in the Middle East, China, and Japan, and about engaging fans of the legendary pop artist through social media and interactive technology (on-site at the museum, and online).

In 2013, Shiner curated the Armory Focus portion of the Armory Show. He spoke with us about the commercial side of the art world. He explains, “Warhol himself saw absolutely no separation between art and business.”

Finally, Shiner discusses the impact of the internet on the art world and how he finds new and exciting artists.

OPENING MUSIC this episode provided by Artificial Human.

Jim Rugg is a Pittsburgh-based comic book artist, graphic designer, zinemaker, and writer best known for AfrodisiacThe Plain Janes, and Street Angel. His latest print project is Supermag (AdHouse Books).

Jasen Lex is a designer and illustrator from Pittsburgh. He is currently working on a graphic novel called Washington Unbound. All of his art and comics can be found at jasenlex.com.

Ed Piskor is the cartoonist who drew the comic, Wizzywig, and draws the Brain Rot/ Hip Hop Family Tree comic strip on Boing Boing, soon to be collected by Fantagraphics Books.


Listen to Previous Episodes


Episodes from Tell Me Something I Don’t Know: Season 1 can be found here


Hip Hop Family Tree is now available for pre-order on Amazon for 38% off cover. 


Supermag is now available from Amazon | your Local Comics Shop | Adhouse Books | Jim Rugg


Interested in sponsoring one of Boing Boing’s podcasts? VisitPodlexing!

Tell Me Something I Don’t Know is Boing Boing’s podcast featuring artists, writers, filmmakers, and other creative people discussing their work, ideas, and the practical side of how they do what they do. In episode 22, we speak to Eric Shiner, Director of the Andy Warhol Museum in Pittsburgh, PA.

“To Give Voice to Those That Don’t Have It” and “Making the Anomalies of Society Into the Paradigms of Society” are among his responsibilities as the museum’s director. Over the past twenty years, Andy Warhol’s popularity has soared. Shiner talks with us about Warhol’s legacy, about exhibiting the museum’s collection in the Middle East, China, and Japan, and about engaging fans of the legendary pop artist through social media and interactive technology (on-site at the museum, and online).

Finally, Shiner discusses the impact of the internet on the art world and how he finds new and exciting artists. 

Artist T. Foley Kicks Off New Art Project at Pittsburgh's Waffle Shop

 The HECTOR CAN’T TALK Talk Show

“The Waffle Shop’s first talk show hosted by a ventriloquist dummy who’s reticent to perform in public.”

The HECTOR CAN’T TALK Talk Show features Pittsburgher T. Foley as the interpreter for a ventriloquist dummy who wants his own talk show, but is reluctant to perform in public. Foley is an artist already known for “throwing voices” via her cell-phone based public art project, Locally Toned (www.locallytoned.org). At midnight on Friday June 10th at the Waffle Shop in East Liberty, the artist will lend her ear and voice to Hector, helping him to get his start show business (while she mines content for new artworks).

     Public participation will be encouraged during the one-hour show, en-restaurant and online, to crowdsource creative content for a new series of videos about issues of voice (to be later enacted by Foley and the dummy in a studio setting). The online audience will be invited to help script a video short entitled VENTWITTOQUISMs, by tweeting verbal responses to hashtags issued by Hector on various themes. The live audience will be prompted to participate on stage, as guests, helping the artist and the dummy prepare dramaturgy for STAND UP (a video featuring monologues poached from Craigslist personal ads). Select content developed within The HECTOR CAN’T TALK Talk Show will appear as part of Foley’s contribution to the Gertrude’s Lot exhibition in September at the Andy Warhol Museum curated by Eric Shiner (part of the 2011 Pittsburgh Biennial).

     *Participate in the project (or follow the dummy) at twitter.com/ventwittoquisms.

artsjournal.com
Warhol Museum Regards the Met’s "Regarding Warhol," Plans Major Changes


The crowd on Dec. 18 at the Metropolitan Museum’s “Regarding Warhol: Sixty Artists, Fifty Years”
Photo by Lee Rosenbaum


What do you do when you sign onto what sounds like a very promising project—the Metropolitan Museum’s Regarding Warhol exhibition (now closed), only to find that it’s a popular success but a critical train wreck?

You reconceive it.

Eric Shiner, director of the most sympathetic place to see Warhol’s work—the Andy Warhol Museum, where the show travels (Feb. 3-Apr. 28)—is billed in his institution’s recent press release as curator of the show’s Pittsburgh presentation. I asked Shiner if his show would differ from the New York version, and whether the negative critical response would be taken into account.

And how. Here’s what Eric told me today:

The installation at the Andy Warhol Museum will be quite different from the installation at the Met. Of course, we will have many more Warhol works on display in our galleries, and perhaps the biggest change will be the space dedicated to the exhibition: In Pittsburgh, we will spread the show over six floors of the museum.

Sadly, about six of the works from the Met show were unable to travel to Pittsburgh for a variety of reasons, but we have replaced them with similar works by the same artists from the holdings of the Carnegie Museum of Art, our sister institution. We are also incorporating Kara Walker into the mix, based on her recent statements about Warhol’s Shadows paintings being a huge influence on her and her work.

Finally, we will be making many different juxtapositions and comparisons [emphasis added] between Warhol’s work and the participating artists that will be quite different from the Met exhibition. We have taken the criticisms of the Met show into account as we redesigned the show for Pittsburgh.

This makes an interesting postcript to my November lecture at Middlebury College on How Critics Influence Museums (and vice versa), where I mentioned that the show’s critical drubbing seemed to have no effect on attendance (a point also humorously made by Tom Campbell, the Met’s director, at his museum’s recent press luncheon, where he referred to “Regarding Warhol” as “the show everyone loves to hate,” and then reported on its robust attendance.

Shiner has shined a spotlight on an alternate take on the critical-popular dialectic: Maybe the opinions of critics sometimes do count!

Last evening the Lower East Side Girls Club hosted a beautiful gala event.  Attendees were treated to a tour of the $20 Million facility, as well as performances by the Girls Club Choir and Step Team.  I was the guest of Bee Tham of LYNCH THAM Gallery, also of the Lower East Side.  With all the tours completed, guests were escorted to the beautiful outdoor space and the Kiki Smith Fountain received its dedication from delighted Girls Club co-founder Lyn Pentecost.

The Lower East Side Digital Arts Program Studio

The event was hosted by Eric Shiner, Director of The Andy Warhol Museum, and board members Sara Tecchia, Rachel Weingeist, Lisa Fox, and Nadine Peyser.  Groundbreaking for a Ludlow Street Andy Warhol Museum (NYC satellite) comes this spring, and Shiner looks forward to a long-term relationship with the Lower East Side Girls Club.  This is The Girls Club’s first permanent home, and is located on Avenue D between 7th and 8th Streets.  Yes indeed, LOISAIDA has changed, and evolved.

Created 18 years ago to fill a huge gap in services and opportunities for girls aged 6-23. The club began operating out of living rooms, basements, and any available open spaces on the Lower East Side because no such programs existed!

Future Music Maker at the Lower East Side Beats by Girlz Space

Across from Tompkins Square Park, there’s the last remaining Boys only club… all the rest officially opened up to girls, becoming the Boys & Girls Club of America.

The AirStream Sound Room

Local Mothers disappointed with the lack of opportunities for girls and young women took matters into their own hands.

Digital Photography Studio

18 Years later they have succeeded in creating one of the most amazing spaces in all of New York City.  Amazing for its design, and more importantly phenomenal programing.

Bedazzled Piano

Still their work is not done… Adriana Pezzulli implored the philanthropic crowd of givers to consider long-term support.

BioBase Program Director, Latasha Wright, Ph.D. introducing the STEM Programs to one of multiple tour groups.

Folks, they have a PLANETARIUM, million dollar biology equipment, the list of amazing opportunities for girls goes on.  Mark my words, The Lower East Side Girls Club is becoming a stronger foundation for future A Listers across multiple platforms.  Bee, you were right… I am completely inspired!

 

The Lower East Side Girls Club—18 Years of Perseverance Pays Off BIG TIME! Last evening the Lower East Side Girls Club hosted a beautiful gala event.  Attendees were treated to a tour of the $20 Million facility, as well as performances by the Girls Club Choir and Step Team.