Safe blogs are great, but often they aren’t specific. I know I’ve told my family that I run a Star Trek blog, so giving them a url of an aesthetic blog isn’t going to help. So I’ve made @yamoksauce.

@yamoksauce is a safe blog that posts only Star Trek. Nothing will be controversial, no gay ships, no Star Trek meta that is risky (like the abortion posts, etc.), nothing that could endanger someone closeted or in an oppressive household. It will only post innocent screencaps and funny textposts that are to do with Star Trek (all series).

If you ever need to give out your url but don’t want to endanger yourself, use this blog! No personal details will be on there so anyone can use it, and there will be a basic theme including a tags page. Signal boosting is appreciated!

practicing medicine in Star Trek

major character is shot w weird space gun that steals his lungs: doctor devises a set of holographic lungs to keep him alive until adequate replacements can be found

minor character gets stabbed once in the back w a regular old knife not 50 meters from sickbay: dies instantly. bashir scans him w a tricorder and shakes his head solemnly. there’s nothing he can do.

major character suffers traumatic brain injury, rendering him comatose and just days from death: doctor grows a genetic clone from a gob of alien goo and harvests neurological tissue at just the right time (not w/o its moral dilemmas)

tasha yar zapped by a tar pit: beverly crusher  ¯\_(ツ)_/¯


Represent the Federation in Starfleet Academy!

Another partnership with Quantum Mechanix, Inc., the Starfleet Academy Enlistment Campaign poster series was set in motion just after the 2009 Star Trek film debuted in theaters and inspired a whole new generation of fans to don their dress uniforms and descend into Geekdom with the rest of us. 

The four core tenants of Starfleet were represented by each illustration and meant to inspire recruits to sign up and serve the Federation.  While the series has not been produced, it was a rewarding experience to get to illustrate and design these WPA-style recruitment posters.

Let History Never Forget the Name Enterprise

Just as the captains of the fictional 24th century Starfleet blazed a trail among the stars, the space shuttle Enterprise helped pave the way for future space exploration. 

Fifty years ago, Star Trek debuted with the USS Enterprise as the main space-faring vessel used in much of the Star Trek universe. As such, the vessel holds a treasured place in the hearts of Star Trek fans and is as much of a character in the show as Kirk and Spock. Over three different series and a total of 14 seasons on TV and 13 feature films, the iterations of Enterprise have captured the imaginations and provided inspiration for its fans across the globe. 

This brief history of the shuttle tells the tale of humanity’s first reusable spacecraft. Space shuttles were first built in the late 1970s and were flown in space from 1981 to 2011. Their missions ranged from helping to build the International Space Station to repairing the Hubble Space Telescope.   

It’s All In The Name

The first shuttle was originally to be named Constitution, celebrating the country’s bicentennial and was to be unveiled to the public on Constitution Day, Sept. 17, 1976. However, a massive letter-writing campaign by Star Trek fans prompted President Gerald Ford to suggest the change. In the above photo, we see the shuttle Enterprise rolled out in Palmdale, California, with cast members of Star Trek on Sept. 17, 1976. 

To Boldly Go …

This circular red, white and blue emblem was  the official insignia for the Space Shuttle Approach and Landing Test flights and became a model for future space shuttle mission patch designs, including placing the names of the crew on the patch . The four astronauts listed on the patch are: 

  • Fred Haise., commander of the first crew 
  • Charles Fullerton, pilot of the first crew 
  • Joe Engle, commander of the second crew 
  • Dick Truly, pilot of the second crew 

First Impressions

In this image, Enterprise makes its first appearance mated to its boosters as it is slowly rolled to the huge Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB) at Kennedy Space Center. Although she never flew in space, shuttle Enterprise underwent a series of fit and function checks on the pad in preparation for the first launch of its sister craft, Columbia.

Not Meant To Be

Enterprise sits on Launch Complex 39 at Kennedy Space Center undergoing tests after completing its 3.5 mile journey from the VAB. Have you ever wondered why Enterprise never went into space? Converting Enterprise from a training vehicle to space-worthy one was too cost prohibitive, our engineers felt.


Commander Fred Haise and pilot Charles Fullerton are seen in the cockpit of Enterprise prior to the fifth and final Approach and Landing Test at Dryden Flight Research Center (Armstrong Flight Research Center). The tests were performed to learn about the landing characteristics of the shuttle.

It’s Been An Honor To Serve With You

The Enterprise’s two crews pose for a photo op at the Rockwell International Space Division’s Orbiter assembly facility at Palmdale, California. They are (left to right) Charles Fullerton, Fred Haise, Joe Engle and Dick Truly.

Fair Winds And Following Seas

On July 6, 2012, the Enterprise, atop a barge, passes the Statue of Liberty on its way to the Intrepid Sea, Air and Space Museum, where is now permanently on display.

Learn more about Star Trek and NASA.

Make sure to follow us on Tumblr for your regular dose of space: