Endings

swax  asked:

Hi I'm writing a fic, which is a coda. I didn't like how the last season of the show ended, and decided to write a sequel to "fix" it. I know where I want it to go, I also have an outline of what should happen but I can't obviously make it happen overnight. So how do I connect everything, without making it sound like an unrelated patchwork of events? I already had this issue with an original story, and I gave up on it. I don't want to go through this again: I really care about that fic!

Thanks for your question, love!  That sounds like an exciting project :)  You definitely shouldn’t give up yet!

So your question is a bit vague in terms of what your exact problem is, but I think I get what you’re saying.  You have multiple plots/subplots going on, but nothing really pulling them together into one story – no cause and effect.  If that’s the case, I think I have some ideas for you.


Traits of a Cohesive Story

  • Theme – A solid theme – whether literal (e.g. each plot revolves around people dying of cancer), emotional (e.g. multiple characters face the same emotion, like loneliness or passion), or moral (e.g. multiple situations require a moral decision, like pacifism vs. justice) (in other words, Undertale) – can tie even the most disparate plots together.  For fanfiction, maintaining themes from the source material is very important to create an authentic, in-character feeling.  Think about the themes in your show – this will give you direction.
  • Character arcs – While most writers know to develop their characters, we don’t always think about the structure of an arc.  Like any good plot, your main characters should have a beginning point (who they are, untouched), a direction they’re going (how they’re growing, for better or worse), a setback or two, and their ultimate decision of whether to continue growing, or to regress.  Strong character arcs give a story purpose, and create that sense of continuity you may be lacking.
  • A message – No matter how many different events occur in your story, if you can draw them toward one message, you’ll come out looking fine!  The message could be very specific (e.g. when the world ends, all that matters is having someone to hold), or vague (e.g. “it’s always darkest before the dawn”), as long as it encompasses multiple plot points or character arcs.  Think about what you’re saying to the reader, and try to boil it down to one distinct point.
  • A conclusive ending – Plots or events that seem disjointed can be pulled together by a mutual ending – a final result that wouldn’t be possible if things had transpired differently.  Even if it’s as simple as the butterfly effect (the entire premise of Life is Strange) (sorry, I’m in a video game mood), an ending that involves most (or all) of the story’s plots will make everything feel connected.

I hope this helps you to move forward with what sounds like a great story :)  If this wasn’t helpful, be sure to send us another ask with more information!

Thanks again, and good luck!

– Mod Joanna ♥️


If you need advice on general writing or fanfiction, you should maybe ask us!

Joseph Christiansen Secret/Cult Ending Manuscript

I went digging through the Level 18 gibberish and sorted out all the dialogue into a manageable manuscript if anyone is interested in reading this secret wild ride. None of the dialogue is labeled so I did my best to interpret who was saying what so any mistakes are my bad. It took a few hours to put together but I felt like some people would like more than just a summary so here is the full text:

MC will be short for Main Character or your player.

** edit 07/26/17: minor text fixes, better formatting, the insertion of more images (courtesy of purpledragon42) , and insert of a working readmore **

Level 18- Joseph Bad Ending or True Ending ( Who knows? )

This appears to take place after MC and Joseph Christiansen engage in sex in the yacht, except you don’t wake up to what you expect. This takes place in Cult_Dungeon1.

(Photo Credits: Game Grumps)

START: You’re A Monster

MC:

Yaaaaaaaaaaaaaawn. What time is it? Must have been asleep for ages. I wonder what will happen now that Mary is gone? What about Joseph’s kids? And how will Amanda feel about all this? That’s what matters… . Well, we all have each other. I guess time will tell, right? Better get up and greet the day.

Am I tied up?! What the hell?! How did I get here? What’s going on?! Joseph? Anybody?

You’re probably just dreaming. Why would there be a… Don’t panic… . a dungeon. An evil dungeon. Why would there be an evil dungeon here? This can’t be real. Maybe I had too much Twilight Rouge. I’m dreaming, or something.

???:

Oh, I guarantee this is real.

Keep reading

It’s that feeling of knowing that things won’t ever be the same again. That feeling when you know it’s all coming to an end. That feeling when you can see how everything will stop as quickly as it started. That’s the worst feeling of them all.

Nouns in Italian are either masculine or feminine. Usually, you can guess the gender and number of a noun based on the ending it takes. Here’s how to guess most of them based on their endings.

masculines in -o and femenines in -a

Generally, nouns ending in -o are masculine and those ending in -a or -tà are feminine. Usually, masculine nouns end in -o in the singular and -i in the plural, whereas femenine nouns end in -a in the singular and -e in the plural, e.g.

  • il libro - book
  • i libri - books
  • la casa - house
  • le case - houses
  • la lealtà - loyalty
  • la bontà - goodness

Note: nouns ending in -tà have no plural form.

There are, however, some feminine nouns ending in -o, e.g.

  • la mano - hand
  • l’auto - car
  • la libido - libido
  • la radio - radio
  • la moto - motorcycle
  • la metro - underground, subway
  • l’eco - echo

and some masculine nouns ending in -a, e.g.

  • l’aldilà - afterlife
  • il lama - llama
  • il duca - duke
  • il gorilla - gorilla
  • il pigiama - pyjamas, pajamas (US)
  • il sofà - sofa

nouns ending in -e

Most nouns ending in -e can be either masculine or feminine, e.g.

  • l’arte (f.) - art
  • l’amore (m.) - love
  • il cuore - heart
  • il re - king
  • il mese - month
  • il sole - sun
  • il mare - sea
  • il latte - milk
  • il giudice - judge
  • la croce - cross
  • la fede - faith
  • la luce - light
  • la pace - peace

-e / -a pairs

  • signore, signora - lord, lady
  • padrone, padrona - master/owner

nouns ending in -(is)ma, -(e)ma, -(o)ma, -ta and -arca 

Nouns ending in one of these endings are masculine nouns of Greek origin and change to -i for the plural, e.g.

  • l’aforisma - aphorism
  • il carisma - charisma
  • il cinema - cinema (UK), movie theatre (US)
  • il poema - poem
  • il clima - climate
  • il dramma - play, drama
  • il problema - problem
  • il programma - programme (UK), program (US)
  • l’idioma - language
  • il pirata - pirate
  • l’asceta - ascetic
  • il pilota - pilote
  • il poeta - poet
  • il monarca - monarch
  • il patriarca - patriarch

nouns ending in -ore, -one

Generally, nouns ending in one of these endings are masculine, e.g.

  • l’errore - error
  • genitore - parent
  • il fiore - flower
  • il calore - heat
  • l’autore - author
  • il colore - colour (UK), color (US)

nouns ending in -tudine, -zione, -sione, -gione and -tù

Nouns ending in one of these endings are feminine, e.g.

  • la solitudine - solitude, loneliness
  • la nazione - nation
  • la definizione - definition
  • la visione - vision
  • la ragione - reason
  • la virtù - virtue
  • la gioventù - youth
  • la tribù - tribe

nouns that can be both masculine and feminine

Words that refer to people can be either masculine or feminine, e.g.

  • amico, amica - friend
  • bambino, bambina - child
  • figlio, figlia - son, daughter
  • maestro, maestra - teacher, master
  • orso, orsa - bear
  • gatto, gatta - cat

Note: a lot of animals only have a masculine or feminine form, e.g. l’uccello (bird), il serpente (snake), la lucertola (lizard), la volpe (fox), etc.

nouns ending in -essa, -ina, -trice

Nouns ending in one of these endings are feminine

  • poeta, poetessa - poet, poetess
  • principe, principessa - prince, princess
  • elefante, elefantessa - elephant
  • dottore, dottoressa - doctor
  • leone, leonessa - lion, lioness
  • campione, campionessa - champion
  • eroe, eroina - hero, heroine
  • re, regina - king, queen
  • imperatore, imperatrice - emperor, empress

nouns ending in -ista and -ante

Nouns ending in -ista can be either masculine or feminine. To form their plural an -i or an -e is added.

  • il giornalista, i giornalisti - the journalist (m. s.), the journalist (m. pl.)
  • la giornalista, le giornaliste - the journalist (f. s.), the journalist (f. pl.)

Nouns ending in -ante can be either masculine or feminine. To form their plural an -i is added.

  • il cantante, i cantanti - the singer (m. s.), the singer (m. pl.)
  • la cantante, le cantanti - the singer (f. s.), the singer (f. pl.)

nouns ending in -ente

Nouns ending in -ente are usually masculine (but not always), e.g.

  • lo studente (studentessa) - student (female student)
  • il presidente (la presidentessa) - president (female president)
  • il paziente - patient

nouns ending in -iere

Nouns ending in -iere are always masculine, but a feminine noun can sometimes be obtained by changing the final vowel if the word refers to people, e.g.

  • il paniere - basket
  • il panettiere, la panettiera - male baker, female baker
  • l’infermiere, l’infermiera - male nurse, female nurse
  • il parrucchiere, la parrucchiera - male hairdresser, female hairdresser

irregular plurals

§1 a lot of nouns describing people present a distinct form depending on the natural gender of the person, e.g.

  • uomo, donna - man, woman
  • fratello, sorella - brother, sister
  • padre, madre - father, mother
  • mamma, papà - mum, dad
  • dio, dea - god, goddess

§2 a lot of nouns are masculine in the singular and feminine in the plural, e.g.

  • l’uovo, le uova - egg, eggs
  • il dito, le dita - finger, fingers
  • braccio, braccia - arm, arms
  • riso, risa - laugh, laughs

You can read about it here and here.

13luecloud  asked:

Hi! (LOL, I'm so awkward. 😂) I have a question: do you have tips on writing striking first (and last) sentences? Whenever I try to start writing I always stress a lot on the first sentences (and the last ones) because I believe readers remember them the most. Often I back down from writing because I don't believe the first sentence is good enough. I've been reading stories and books and observed how they do it to help myself to do better, but I still end up with the same problem.

Writing Striking First and Last Lines

Listen up, and listen well: the first sentence of your first draft is allowed to be terrible.  It is not a reflection on your skills as a writer, and certainly not any indication of how the rest of your draft will be. Beginnings are stressful as hell, but you shouldn’t let it get in your way. 

Some people have first sentence block, some people have first page block. They start writing, can’t think of anything good enough, and end up staring at a blank document for hours, waiting for inspiration to strike and a perfect first sentence to appear on the screen. My advice? Don’t wait for inspiration, you’ll never get anything done that way. 

Let’s look at the function of first and last lines. I’ll use examples from one of my favourite books, Uprooted by Naomi Novik.

First Line:

The first sentence needs to pose a “why” question to the reader. 

Our Dragon doesn’t eat the girls he takes, no matter what stories they tell outside our valley.” 

So, this tells me that the protagonist lives in a valley with a somewhat notorious Dragon. This Dragon takes girls away, but doesn’t eat them. 

I’m immediately left wondering, who is this Dragon and why doesn’t he eat girls? Why does he take girls if not to eat them? 

I’m left curious, but not confused. I want to know why, and so I’m going to read on. This is an excellent first sentence that does its job of hooking the reader. 

Last Line (!!Spoiler Warning!!)

The last sentence needs to answer that question, or if there is a sequel, hint at a new question. 

““Come and meet my mother,” I said. I reached out and took his arm.”

 These are the last two sentences, but they’re short and work well together. 

Throughout the novel, we’re presented with many questions. The initial “Who is the Dragon?” quickly develops to a “Who will Dragon become to our protagonist?” and this last line answers it. (Of course, there are questions of the “Will the world be saved?” variety in the middle).

This ending is also a reflection of the beginning. The story starts when the Dragon unexpectedly takes our seemingly unremarkable protagonist into his world. The story ends with our protagonist taking the Dragon into hers. We’ve come to full circle, and this last line gives us closure.

When we first start writing our story, we often only have a vague idea of the questions that we’ll be presenting to our readers. These questions become clearer as we write on.  

And remember, people often start their story in the wrong place. They start it too early, or maybe too late. They’re looking for a perfect first line in the wrong place. Imagine that, the first line that you spent days and days on being scrapped in revisions. 

The best advice I can give is this: if the first sentence/paragraph/page is holding you back, then start at the second. Put it aside, start writing your your story at a place you feel comfortable and confident, orient yourself and then come back later. The most important thing to do is write.

Don’t stress it, give it a go, and you may find that somewhere down the line, a perfect first line may come to you. 

D

This is when you know it is over. When you find yourselves constantly scrambling for something to hold onto. When every kiss, sorry glance, and soft graze of a hand feels like you are calling out to each other in silent desperation from far across the stars.
—  Beau TaplinT h e  W i d e n i n g  V o i d
On Finishing Stories

Anonymous asked: “I never got to finish a story I wrote. I always write a lot of chapters, but I don’t know why I just can’t finish them. Do you have tips on how to end a story?”

Finishing a story, or a novel or a draft or whatever you’re working on takes a lot of time and endurance. I don’t think there’s any kind of worthwhile list or bunch of resources that I could give you on endings you can just plug into your story and make it work, but instead, I’m going to talk about how the ending should be rooted in the story from the beginning. 

Keep reading