Elite-Women

New blog on the Gymternet

FINALLY created a stand-alone blog for my obsession with gymnastics. So, if you’re a blog relating to:
-NCAA gymnastics
-Elite Gymnastics
-Rhythmic Gymnastics
-The Final Five
-Etc.
PLEASE reblog/like this so I can follow you!

4

2017 Shamrock Shuffle 8K
28:49, 5:48/mi, 9th age group, 223rd overall

I was shooting for 30:00 in my return to racing after rehabbing from plantar fasciitis. After a few weeks training at that level, I had an inkling I could pull off something better, but you never really know until you’re out there. Even though this was 43 seconds slower than last year, I’m very pleased with how far I’ve come after cutting back a lot over the winter.

Keep reading

ew.com
'Thor: Ragnarok': Why Does Thor Have Short Hair? Where's His Hammer? The Plot Revealed!
Haircuts. Swords. Goth eye shadow. All of these elements are part of Thor: Ragnarok. So WTF is this movie about?

When we last saw Thor, he was flying off to figure out who was manipulating the Avengers at the end of Age of Ultron. Eventually, he hears rumblings of trouble in Asgard: His evil brother, Loki (Tom Hiddleston), has been impersonating their missing father, Odin (Anthony Hopkins). Loki’s rather lax governing leads to the reemergence of an imprisoned Hela (Cate Blanchett). Thor’s initial encounter with Hela gets him blasted to Sakaar, a barbaric planet ruled by the charming but nefarious Grandmaster (Jeff Goldblum). Valkyrie (Tessa Thompson), a tough, hard-drinking warrior hiding out on Sakaar brings the god to the Grandmaster. “Thor is a bit of a fanboy for the Valkyrie, the elite women warriors,” Hemsworth says. Thor is then forced into becoming a gladiator, which leads to his haircut and the loss of his trusty hammer. (His replacement weapons include a pair of swords seen on EW’s cover.)

Sakaar’s most popular and successful gladiator? Bruce Banner, a.k.a. the Hulk. Comics fans will recognize this plotline as part of the popular Planet Hulk series. “He’s much more of a character than the green rage machine you’ve seen in the Avengers movies,” Ruffalo says of this new Hulk. “He’s got a swagger. He’s like a god.”

Once Thor and Hulk unite, Ragnarok becomes a sort of road-trip film, with director Taika Waititi drawing inspiration from movies like 48 HRS., Withnail and I, and even Planes, Trains and Automobiles. The director particularly wanted to show off Hemsworth’s comedic abilities, only recently exploited in films like Vacation and Ghostbusters. “He’s so good and underutilized in that department,” Waititi says. “He’s legitimately one of the funniest things in this film.”

Fans will also see some familiar faces, like Benedict Cumberbatch’s Stephen Strange. The New York-based sorcerer met with Thor in the post-credits epilogue of Doctor Strange, and he will help the Asgardian locate Odin. Teases Feige, “There’s not a whole lot that takes place on Earth in this film, and that’s one of the things that does.”

The events of Ragnarok will also help set up Marvel’s biggest Phase 3 installment, Avengers: Infinity War, the first half of which is due in May 2018. But Waititi is adamant that his film will not only stand on its own, it will reinvent the franchise. “A lot of what we’re doing with the film is, in a way, kind of dismantling and destroying the old idea and rebuilding it in a new way that’s fresh,” he says. “Everyone’s got a slightly new take on their characters, so in that way, it feels like [this is] the first Thor.” Just with a little less hair.

2

The Difference Between Tayuu/Oiran (Historical Edo era High-Class Courtesans) and Geisha (Historic and Modern Performing Artists/Entertainers):

Here, I will explain the aesthetic and cultural differences of the Geisha and the Tayuu/Oiran courtesan. Geisha work as entertainers in the modern world. Prostitution was made illegal in Japan in 1959, though Tayuu (known today, and ever since the decline of the Tayuu line in the 1700s, as Oiran) entertain today sans-sexual favors. 

**Please note: though historically, Oiran were working within the sex industry, neither modern Oiran nor Geisha have anything to do with said industry 

Geisha:

  • Make-up: While the white face and red lips are a feature of both courtesan and Geisha, their overall look is different. Oshiroi/Shironuri white powder is used, just like actors do in Kabuki theatre.
  • Dance and Music: Dance is one of the most important things a Geisha trains for. Her rigorous schedule is based around not only clients, parties and performances, but around her strict and traditional dance classes. Many Geisha attend dance classes until they are elderly and continue to perfect their skills, if they hadn’t retired! The shamisen, hand drum or flute are also some of the things Geisha learn, and Jikata Geisha (special Geisha who are trained in music and singing) provide music for a Geisha’s performance at parties (called Ozashiki)
  • Kimono and Obi Belt: The kimono worn by Geisha are very specific and are worn based on many factors, which include the status of the geisha (apprentice geisha (Maiko) have very different kimono from the older, professional geisha (Geiko) in that Maiko are by default more “child-like” and elaborate, with many bright colors and ornaments, while a Geiko wear more even-tones that are simpler but more womanly and elegant.) or are colored and designed by season and occasion. A Geisha’s kimono has about 5 layers of undergarments, tied to the Geisha to create the outer shape of the silk kimono. The obi belt is many meters long and is tied in the back, and takes the strength of another person just to tie it! Maiko wear their obi belts trailing behind them to accentuate their cuter, “youthful” appearance as it makes them appear smaller, while Geiko wear their obi belts tied into a tight, neat box. These kimono are tied together to allow a Geisha to dance and perform and are made to pair elegantly with each dance performance. If the belt were tied loosely in the front, as a courtesan Tayuu/Oiran’s is, then the geisha would be more limited in their dance and it would mask their subtle, minute movements. It is all a true work of art, and each kimono is unique to the Geisha (excepting the kimono used for some dance performances or ceremonies).
  • Hair Ornaments and Footwear: A Maiko wears many finely detailed hair ornaments–many are made of intricate silk designs. Each ornament is hand-crafted by Kyoto artisans and are very valuable; not only in terms of expense, but to the Maiko herself. Ornaments change with seasons, ceremony and rank-changing. A Geiko wears simpler ornaments like tortoise shell style combs and sometimes jade pins, though the ornaments are not limited to those designs. New Maiko wear six-inch high clogs called Okobo, though more experienced Maiko and professional Geiko can wear glossy leather Zori or Geta sandals, depending on the weather/preference.
  • Hair of Maiko and Geiko: The Maiko wear about six different hairstyles, made up of their own hair, within their time as an apprentice (these are–
  1. Wareshinobu–her first hairstyle
  2. Mishidashi–hairstyle for the ceremony of her debut
  3. Ofuku–”Coming of Age” hairstyle; becoming a more senior Maiko
  4. Shimada–used for dance recitals (and it used to be a traditional hairstyle for married women!)
  5. Katsuyama–Used for the annual Cherry Blossom Dances (Miyako Odori) in the month of April
  6. Sakkou–The hairstyle worn by a Maiko for her final two months before debuting as a professional Geiko/Geisha!

Geiko wear their natural hair underneath a wig, in a style referred to as Shimada

  • Geisha as Entertainers: Geisha are trained from their beginnings in the arts of Dance, Music, Tea Ceremony, and are well educated in the cultural arts. They are expert conversationalists; flattery and sake-pouring, along with lively and educated conversation are what Geisha bring to Ozashiki (the parties/events within the Ochaya teahouses). Contrary (extremely) to popular belief, Geisha are not and were never a part of prostitution or the sex industry. Ozashiki are a place for customers–who are not only men, but women or families, wealthy tourists, famous folk or groups of businessmen–to unwind and experience the traditional arts that Geisha have kept alive.


Tayuu/Oiran Courtesans:

  • Make-Up: The Oshiroi/Shironuri white make-up paired with red lips is used much like a Geisha’s. Red accents to eyes, eyebrows and cheeks are also used by both women.
  • Entertainment and Music: There are only about 5 active Oiran entertainers in the “flower town” district of the Kyoto Hanamachi. These women are trained in the traditional arts just as Geisha are–historically, Oiran were high-class Tayuu and were trained in music, flower-arrangment, calligraphy and social arts, but with the added aspect of sexual favors. These women were elite and had the power to personally reject a client. Today, Oiran, though few, exist as historic actresses and as entertainers very much like a Geisha. These women both keep Japan’s history alive.
  • Hairstyle and Hair Ornaments: The hairstyle of an Oiran courtesan is called Datehyougo–as you can see it is an extremely elaborate hairstyle much different than the styles Geiko and Maiko wear. This difference is important, as the Datehyougo hairstyle has perhaps little or even nothing to do with Geisha or their culture. The ornamentals of an Oiran’s hair are a plethora of combs and picks, arranged by rank/status of the courtesan. 
  • Kimono and Obi Belt: Much confusion surrounds the tying of the obi belt between Geisha and courtesans. It’s simple, really: Oiran had their intricately designed obi tied elegantly, though loosely, in the front of their kimono. This was so that clients receiving favor from the courtesan could undo the kimono. Geisha on the other hand, keep their kimono on, tie their obi in styles on the back and are cinched up tight around the Geisha to hold everything together. Their kimono have many more layers than the Geisha–all in an Edo-period fashion. The overall style promotes a more “loose” looking aesthetic, which was very erotic in it’s time. 
  • Footwear: While Okobo and some Geta can be very tall, the footwear of an Oiran can come in the form of 15 cm high, black lacquered Geta. During the Oiran Dochu (Oiran walking parade), an Oiran can be seen walking with her many attendants, swinging her tall Geta out to the side smoothly with each step. It is very beautiful to see!
  • “Attendants”: A big difference between the Oiran and the Geisha is that while Geisha have “younger sisters” whom they take under their wing as apprentices, Oiran have what are called child attendants. These children traditionally were apprentices who would attend to and shadow the courtesan, and who would later be initiated as courtesans as well. 

Thank you so much for reading! Hope you learned something! :)

- @crylie

5

MARATHON MONDAY! Best day in Boston!

I slept 10 hours last night (!!!!!!) and then went over to my friends house for pancakes! Then we headed over to Cleveland Circle to watch the marathon! It was AMAZING! We got to see the elite men and women, lots of wheelchair racers, and then thousands of runners pass by. It was a hot day and I’m just so inspired by their grit and their joy out on the course! Makes me sooo excited to run my first 26.2 next month!

After, I got groceries and went to sweetgreen (earth bowl all the way) and then home for a nap🙈I haven’t slept this much in a while and I reallllllt needed it! Then I went out for a run (1 up, 2 at HMP, 1 at 10k pace, 0.5 cooldown) and then I spent about an hour preparing food for the week! Bout to chat with B and get ready for tomorrow and then get to bed!

Confessions

This confession is actually about Beyoncé. I just defended her with the tenaciousness and the voracity, like I was one of her stans. Then, I came to an enlightenment, of sorts, afterwards.

Long story short: I was in mixed company (men and women, different races/cultures while eating Popeyes with wine), at a small dinner party, when the topic of Beyoncé came up. A song of hers began playing, over the radio. One of the party’s host (another Black woman, a childhood friend-turned-FB acquaintance, during the past fifteen years)started up with her uninvited critique about the singer (meaning, no one asked this bitch for her Rolling Stone Magazine-worthy review) and she began to make me feel uncomfortable.

It was uncomfortable because she began critiquing Beyoncé… Not about the music/the other projects that she has put out. In particular… About her physical looks (the whole ‘she’s trying to be white’), the rumors about the infidelity and about the ‘fake pregnancy’… And, about the singer’s level of intelligence. The barometer that she used were from old Beyoncé interviews and based off of her dialect and her diction from those conversations.

'She’s not smart… She doesn’t have a high school diploma…She sounds country…’ Then she started to perform this 'impersonation’ of her, which was extremely mean-spirited and reeked of educational elitism and anti-Black ideology.

Then, one of her friends (a non-Black person) started to laugh and nod his head in agreement.

And something in me just snapped. As someone who is living with a developmental problem (it takes me a few seconds to decipher words from a conversation, which makes my responses delayed) and I have a lisp, I was bullied/ridiculed and was perceived as being 'slow’… As being 'stupid’… As being 'dumb’. By kids and by adults. So, to hear this woman declared that another person was 'dumb’ because of her lack of higher education, her dialect, the location of her hometown and with her choice of words, it pissed me off.

So, I had gone-the fuck-off on her. I invoked the spirit of our patron saint of Sophisticated Reading For Filth, Mrs. Claire Huxtable and I told her about herself. I had to remind her that luck can only carry people so far and I doubt it wouldn’t carry fools into the same direction that Beyoncé is in, currently. Then I told her sorry ass that 'that dumb singer’ has managed to accumulate more of life’s goals than anyone that was inside of that room…. And she didn’t have to max out her credit cards and take money out of senile grandmother’s bank account to do so. *stared intently at her* Then I told her that she might a little right, after all, God looks after babies and fools. Then I gave her my ultimate “fuck you” by telling her that her dinner party sucked and the chicken was dry-as-fuck before I left.

(This is the enlightenment) I don’t feel comfortable critiquing factors from Black cultures, in front of non-Black people. In this case, Black celebs. In previous experiences, when this shit happened, non-Black people felt too-too-too comfortable and then it would go zero-to-100, quick.

Listen, I loathe Azaelia Banks’ personality. I believe Kanye is the Saint for fuckboys. Bill Cosby deserves to have barbed wire enemas for the rest of his life. But my Black-ass won’t say this shit in front of non-Black people because (a lot of times) those three people will be considered as a rep for our race and not just individual, Satan’s smegma, according to them.

Milady’s options

Only tangentially related to Milady, really, and triggered by something I saw in a post about how Milady’s only options as a 17th century woman would be menial jobs, prostitution or marriage. (But then, the show has been written by people who assume that “slave trader” was a reasonable option for a woman from Paris and that “assassin” was a job description on the payroll of the queen’s household, so.)

Even if Milady was a 17th century woman and not a fictional character written by 21st century writers in a very much non-17th century setting, she would have had plenty of choices what to do with her life. If the show had not been written by idiots, and if the writers had not been perpetuating the stereotype that “historical accuracy” means that women never had normal jobs and never contributed to societal and economic developments before the Suffragette movement rolled along.

Okay, so let’s say “menial jobs” are beneath Milady, such as seamstress, embroider, lace-maker, weaver (NB, not all of France is Paris; Tours was the centre of the silk industry, go to Tours, you stupid woman, and get a job there), milliner, shopkeeper, landlady of an inn/hotel, baker/confectioner, a merchantess running her own business (marry a merchant, off him after the wedding, you great big assassin, and inherit his business), etc. 

Let’s assume that Milady is intelligent (as most people appear to see her), ambitious, capable, and a quick learner. She was a count’s wife and the king’s mistress, so she must have some useful social and marketable skills. If there was a job she wanted, what should have stopped her?

Oh, right. Idiotic writing. And the idiotic belief that Women In The Past didn’t have jobs.

Copiously quoted from the “Encyclopedia of Women in the Renaissance”:

Despite the legacy of a misogyny deeply embedded in classical and medieval literature, fifteenth-century humanism provided a gateway for women into the literary and cultural mainstream. The new humanist curriculum introduced a roster of studies that appealed to both women and men. The new humanist curriculum produced women who published works in every literary genre, served unofficially as their husbands’ foreign ministers, acted as regents and coregents of their states, directed their children’s educations, practiced medicine, wrote treatises on every branch of knowledge, and became abbesses and nuns who taught in convent schools.

[…] In the cities and the courts, a few women worked as painters, miniaturists, composers, musicians, singers, and printers. Many such women worked in the ateliers and shops of their fathers. Other women plied their trades as artists and composers under the auspices of a convent.

What is this? Female professions that go beyond “wife”, “sex worker” or “assassin”? Who would’ve thought it!

Misogyny and sexism in the professional sphere does not mean that women didn’t have jobs. It means that their work was not as highly valued and highly paid as men’s, and that their contributions often weren’t recorded.

If menial jobs are beneath her, have some more glamorous ones:

Alchemist - Because there was no formal training in alchemy in universities, guilds, or colleges, women could access alchemical knowledge in the same way that most men did: by cobbling together an alchemical education from a few vernacular texts, by learning techniques from other practitioners, or perhaps by buying a recipe from another peddler of alchemical secrets. Women could also draw on their experience with traditional activities that utilized similar techniques, such as distilling water and cooking. Marie Meurdrac’s “Accessible and Easy Chemistry for Women” was published in 1666.

Nun (in a convent of her choice) – Convents provided protection for women, as well as an education, albeit limited, and they offered nuns a certain autonomy of action not possible for most women in the secular world. Their sphere of action was not limited to the private world of their community, since convent women lived off income from properties they owned, money they lent, and the sale of produce and handicrafts. Convent education and freedom from family responsibilities offered nuns the opportunity to study and to write. In many convents a recorder was appointed to keep account books or to document the history of their foundation and the events of their lives. […] Special convents were founded for reformed prostitutes and for poor girls in danger of turning to such a life. Beginning in the early sixteenth century new orders were founded that were dedicated to educating young women outside convent walls;

Writer – Women had an honored place in literary society by the end of the sixteenth century. A lineage of writers and translators, associated with virtuous household academies and represented as paragons of “learned virtue,” had proved to the intellectual elite that education made women not domestic liabilities but instead positive contributors to family honor and literary culture.

Salonnière (because women who ran salons were not habitually burnt at the stake OMG and Milady actually proved in-universe that she could move around in a salon environment) - In literary contexts, the term “salon” is most often associated with the women of the seventeenth and early eighteenth centuries in France, such as Catherine de Vivonne (1588–1665), the marquise de Rambouillet, renowned for her chambre bleue, her salon for the intellectuals and courtiers who frequented the Hôtel de Rambouillet, and Madeleine de Scudéry (1607–1701), famous for her samedis, or the Saturday meetings of her salon circle, and also author or the longest novel ever published (Artamène ou le Grand Cyrus).

Makeup, cosmetics, perfume maker - Although the craft of cosmetic enhancement was known to women from the ancient times, it is in the Renaissance that its use became increasingly widespread. Perfumes were an expensive and highly sought-after commodity; create a good perfume recipe and off you go.

Medical professional - Women made important contributions to medical practice and theory during the Renaissance in Europe. Their work encompassed a broad range of areas of medical expertise, from nutrition and hygiene to gynecology and obstetrics. Moreover, outside of the health care fields, which were seen as “women’s domain,” they also participated in spheres where both men and women worked as medical providers, such as in surgery and optometry.

In the early seventeenth century, the celebrated surgeon and midwife Maria Colinetia, the wife of a surgeon, traveled throughout Germany demonstrating procedures and is credited with the technique of removing iron splinters from the eye with a magnet. Mary Trye, who trained under her father, published in 1675 one of the first medical manuals for women, her “Medicatrix, or the Woman-Physician”.

In Catholic France, hospital governance transferred from ecclesiastical authorities to lay municipal administrators, but the everyday health care work of women continued to underpin medical services. In some towns, the nuns remained the nursing personnel, but in other cities they were replaced by laywomen. In France, the first licensing regulations were established for Parisian midwives in 1560. [Contraception methods included] medical techniques such as inserting vaginal pessaries of rue and ground lily root combined with castoreum, administering douches designed to cool the womb, and using barrier methods.

Pharmacist - A large number of laywomen were experts in the concoction of medical remedies. Like learned physicians, women used their medications to treat a wide variety of illnesses, including dysentery, ague, fevers, headaches, toothaches, and epilepsy.

Printer - For centuries, scholars have placed women at the margins of the early modern book industry, this in sharp contrast to their contributions as illuminators and scribes in late medieval manuscript production. Knowledge of women’s roles in the early book industry is hampered by scattered and incomplete sources. Chief among these are the books themselves. Even when she published a book, only rarely would a woman sign her name in the colophon.

A printer’s business - even that of a modest typographer - was not usually limited to one shop but rather included multiple shops (for the storage of supplies or purposes of accounting) attached to his place of residence. It was a printing house where business and family often overlapped. Thus, though she might be barred from the printing shop itself, the wife or daughter of a printer could learn other facets of his business, such as bookkeeping, binding books, and preparing paper for printing. Marry a printer, you great accomplished seductress, off him after the wedding, and inherit his business, sorted!

Theatre actress, manager, playwright - European women of the fifteenth through early seventeenth centuries participated in both public and private theatrical activities not only as audience members, but also as playwrights, translators, actresses, patrons, shareholders, employees of theaters, and leaders of acting troupes.

Records of professional French actresses began to appear at the end of the sixteenth century in conjunction with the famous actor Valleran le Conte and his acting troupe. By the latter part of the seventeenth century, Frenchwomen performed regularly both at court and in the public theaters. They also served as theater professionals of another kind: as costumers, ushers, and box office managers. More important, talented actresses earned a share or quarter share in companies and therefore gained a voice and a percentage of the profit.

Translator (Milady presumably speaks English) - The importance of translation in the Renaissance cannot be overestimated. It brought the newly discovered classical texts to a wider audience; it helped circulate the currents of religious debate throughout the Reformation and Counter-Reformation; and it made vernacular works available to a new readership.

Of the approximately one hundred early modern French women writers whose works we know, over 10 percent published translations of ancient or modern vernacular texts, either in manuscript or printed editions. […] Although they were excluded from the colleges, universities, and academies, where translation was a standard part of the curriculum, the works of these women translators reflect the various approaches to translation current in Renaissance France. Such women writers as Anne de Graville, Marie de Cotteblanche, Claudine Scève, Anne de Marquets, Marguerite de Cambis, and Marie de Romieu translated popular Italian and English works into French.


Post brought to you by my ongoing irritation with showrunners and audiences alike who persistently claim that the only jobs available to Women In The Past were “wife”, “domestic servant” or “fallen woman”. Not every “Past” is set in the Jane Austen pastoral English province or Dickensian Victorian London.

Post dedicated to Marie de Gournay (1565–1645), professional writer in Paris, moral philosopher, polemicist for the equality of women, novelist, philologist, and husbandless all her life.