Elias-Canetti

jrrtolkien-deactivated20130203  asked:

There are a few Tumblr users making a fuss about the "my thoughts are stars I can't fathom into constellations" quote being plagerised from Elias Canetti. Did you? Copyright laws confuse me.

I have never read Elias Canetti, but after some googling, it seems like the Canetti quote is, “His head is made of stars, but not yet arranged into constellations.” (This is presumably a translation from German, so I can’t speak to the exact quote.)

That’s a great line, but it’s about something entirely different. I assume it’s about the intellectual experience of adolescence, whereas Augustus’s line in The Fault in Our Stars is about illness and fatigue and not being able to express himself as clearly as he wants to.

Neither Elias Canetti nor myself thought up the idea that constellations are a way of constructing meaning and organization from a disorganized and arbitrary universe. I’m sure neither of us is the first to use that idea in fiction, either. Anyone who claims their fiction is wholly original is lying, but this is not plagiarism. It’s two similar-but-not-at-all-identical things arising independently, as happens all the time in writing (and elsewhere).

For example: another line from the The Fault in Our Stars is, “I fell in love the way you fall asleep: slowly, then all at once.” This is similar to a line from The Sun Also Rises in which a character is asked how he went bankrupt and answers, “Two ways: Gradually and then suddenly.” This line I actually have read and was conscious of when I wrote the line in TFiOS, but it still isn’t plagiarism. Nor is it plagiarism when I wrote “So it goes” in TFiOS even though Slaughterhouse Five made that sentence famous.

Calling a writer a plagiarist is a very serious accusation, so I want to be very clear: I have never plagiarized.

4

İnsanlar kalpleri kırılınca ölürler!
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Bir baba, “Ne diyeyim? Oğluma doyamadan gitti. Siz söyleyin O, Yalova Valisi'ne oğlum öldü. Rahat etsin artık. Anarşist oğlum öldü, rahat etsin. Öğretmenden anarşist olur mu? Rahat etsin. Bu dünya ona da kalmaz.”
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Ne denir ki, insanın canı acıyor, kalbi sızlıyor. Kırılan kalbinden öperim, öğretmenim.. Işıklar içinde uyu.

Defalarca ‘kitap önerisi’ diye soru geldi, ne önereceğimi insanlar ne okusun diyeceğimi bilmezdim ya sevmezlerse, ya zevklerimiz uyuşmaz ise diye.. Öğrencileri ile arkadaş gibi, bir baba - oğul gibi olmuş, (sözüm ona her öğretmen o samimiyeti kuramaz öğrencilerle, bilesiniz,) Tübitak ödüllü, Matematik öğretmeni, Halil Serkan Öz öğretmenimin öğrencilerine hazırladığı kitap listesi [hem Necip Mahfuz’u, hem Simone de Beauvoir’u, hem Yaşar Kemal’i, hem Elias Canetti’yi, hem Kazancakis’i, hem Virginia Woolf’u, hem Atilla İlhan’ı hem Selman Ruşti’yi hem Yusuf Atılgan’ı, hem İtalo Calvino’yu hem Marquez’i hem Samuel Beckett’i ve daha nice nicesi…] duvarınızda asılı dursun, en azından kitap severlerin.. O kitaplar bir dünya. Bir okyanus. Koca bir gökyüzü. Susuzlar için, çölde olan için su. Ben çıktısını alıp duvarıma asacağım, okuduklarıma artı koyup okumadıklarımı temin edeceğim, öğretmenim.. Lütfen, lütfen, lütfen çocuklarınıza, kardeşlerinize, öğrencilerinize, etrafınızdakilere kitap okumanın güzelliğini anlatın, onlara kitap okumayı sevdirin. Başkasına, kılık kıyafet yüzünden, sakal yüzünden, dış görünüşü yüzünden dışlanmayacağı, damgalanmayacağını öğretin. Ancak böyle sevinir Halil öğretmenim. 
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Son olarak, tek isteğim hiçbir kalpsizin bir makama gelmemesi. 

There are books, that one has for twenty years without reading them, that one always keeps at hand, that one takes along from city to city, from country to country, carefully packed, even when there is very little room, and perhaps one leafs through them while removing them from a trunk; yet one carefully refrains from reading even a complete sentence. Then after twenty years, there comes a moment when suddenly, as though under a high compulsion, one cannot help taking in such a book from beginning to end, at one sitting: it is like a revelation. Now one knows why one made such a fuss about it. It had to be with one for a long time; it had to travel; it had to occupy space; it had to be a burden; and now it has reached the goal of its voyage, now it reveals itself, now it illuminates the twenty bygone years it mutely lived with one. It could not say so much if it had not been there mutely the whole time, and what idiot would dare to assert that the same things had always been in it.
People aren’t tapestries, and you don’t get to pull out the threads you don’t like – and if you do, everything falls apart.
— 

Ann Patchett shares advice on friendship and love on Dear Sugar Radio

A generation earlier, Nobel laureate Elias Canetti wrote in contemplating belonging, identity, and what he called “the genes of the soul”:

“A person’s identity … is like a pattern drawn on a tightly stretched parchment. Touch just one part of it, just one allegiance, and the whole person will react, the whole drum will sound.”

Also see Patchett on why self-forgiveness is the most essential ingredient in art

There are books, that one has for twenty years without reading them, that one always keeps at hand, that one takes along from city to city, from country to country, carefully packed, even when there is very little room, and perhaps one leafs through them while removing them from a trunk; yet one carefully refrains from reading even a complete sentence. Then after twenty years, there comes a moment when suddenly, as though under a high compulsion, one cannot help taking in such a book from beginning to end, at one sitting: it is like a revelation. Now one knows why one made such a fuss about it. It had to be with one for a long time; it had to travel; it had to occupy space; it had to be a burden; and now it has reached the goal of its voyage, now it reveals itself, now it illuminates the twenty bygone years it mutely lived with one. It could not say so much if it had not been there mutely the whole time, and what idiot would dare to assert that the same things had always been in it.
—  Elias Canetti, The Human Province

*62/100 days of productivity*

 19.3.16// yeah my desk is a mess.  Going through a lot of stuff and doing a mind map on Canetti’s main Topics. And I’m realizing that, after all, I like this fellow.

2.5.16// I’m having a good time, my paper is almost done, I just need to review the last chapter ( the hardest part actually) and write the introduction and conclusions. I sent the rest to my supervisor, hope she likes it!