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Some wips of my senior project!

I’m be making some more modern D&D style fantasy-based interpretations of the Egyptian gods, both to make a tiny RPG style pantheon guide and TAROT CARDS. 

The first illustration is my first initial rough prototyping pass at my favorite God Dad Osiris for my proposal, currently working on the edited final. He’s going to end up on the Judgement card, considering the domains that he takes care of. 

More updates as the project continues!

I started 2016 off with a goddess & wanted to end it with a goddess! 
Bastet is the most requested illustration I get across social media, so this is also a HUGE **thank you for 10,000** followers here on Tumblr! (ノ∀\*)
Your love and support means so much to meee! ♡♡♡ 
Wishing you all the best in 2017! 

Anubis Aesthetic

Like many ancient Egyptian deities, Anubis assumed different roles in various contexts. Depicted as a protector of graves as early as the First Dynasty (c. 3100 – c. 2890 BC), Anubis was also an embalmer. One of his prominent roles was as a god who ushered souls into the afterlife. He attended the weighing scale during the “Weighing of the Heart,” in which it was determined whether a soul would be allowed to enter the realm of the dead. Despite being one of the most ancient and “one of the most frequently depicted and mentioned gods” in the Egyptian pantheon, Anubis played almost no role in Egyptian myths. Anubis was depicted in black, a color that symbolized both rebirth and the discoloration of the corpse after embalming. His female counterpart is Anput. His daughter is the serpent goddess Kebechet.

Nut Aesthetic

Nut was the Egyptian sky-goddess, whose body created a canopy over the earth. Her body arches across the sky, wearing a dress decorated with stars. She was the sister and wife of Geb, the god of the Earth. She was also the mother of Isis, Osiris, Nepthys and Seth. The ancient Egyptians believed that at the end of the day, Nut swallowed the sun god, Ra, and gave birth to him again the next morning.