Educational-books

This is Selenite! It is named after the Greek word “Selene,” which means moon. It has a moonlike glow when polished. This is one of those special few in the crystal realm that doesn’t require charging. 

Selenite has such a cool property in that it can be used to cleanse your other crystals and stones! Awesome! Just lay the crystals in need of cleansing on top or touching a piece of Selenite for about 15-30 minutes and let this gorgeous crystal clear them! It’s able to do this because of its unique ability to clear blockages or pathways of energy.

Selenite vibrates with a rather high energy. This makes is a great stone for the mind! Some of the lore states that if you and your partner are fighting, exchanging a Selenite stone will bring peace to the relationship.

And lastly, this interesting healing stone is a very powerful protection talisman. It is said to protect the wearer from outside dangers and protect the home when placed in a prominent location.

This particular piece is available here.

I would say Shakespeare continues to be a touchstone. Like most teenagers in high school, when we were assigned, I don’t know, “The Tempest” or something, I thought, ‘My God, this is boring.’ And I took this wonderful Shakespeare class in college where I just started to read the tragedies and dig into them. And that, I think, is foundational for me in understanding how certain patterns repeat themselves and play themselves out between human beings.

Erika Christakis’ new book, The Importance of Being Little, is an impassioned plea for educators and parents to put down the worksheets and flash cards, ditch the tired craft projects (yes, you, Thanksgiving Handprint Turkey) and exotic vocabulary lessons, and double-down on one, simple word:

Play.

That’s because, she writes, “the distinction between early education and official school seems to be disappearing.” If kindergarten is the new first grade, Christakis argues, preschool is quickly becoming the new kindergarten. And that is “a real threat to our society’s future.”

What Kids Need From Grown-Ups (But Aren’t Getting)

Illustration: Annelise Capossela for NPR