Dove Bradshaw

Dove Bradshaw

“The first use of water to effect change began in the early 1980s when I made silver-surfaced paintings chemically treated with liver of sulfur to react with humidity. In the early 1990s I used weather, combining unstable pyrite with marble to make my first shape-changing sculptures. Rain caused the iron pyrite to bleed and leave a permanent stain on the stone with the pyrite itself eventually breaking down and disappearing. In 1996, bringing “weather” inside, I made erosion works in salt and stone using water as the catalyst. A water-filled funnel calibrated for slowest flow was suspended above stone blocks, salt boulders, and mounds. The different densities of these materials gave the work its dynamic range. In Waterstone, from 1996, a pool of water became a fountain in slow motion leaving behind daily tide lines on a porous limestone block. The salt works, too, were indoor fountains with the use of natural materials and the slowness of action constituting a return to real time and real materials— a response to the art world’s overwhelming infatuation with shock value entertainment and virtual reality. There are four works in this series, each distinct in concept and in form, using salt in its three solid states: granules, crystals and boulders, to exhibit different reactions with water.


“The best of the serious art follows Buddhism’s tenet of stripping away the extraneous …And refreshing the conceptualism of the ubiquitous debris pile, Dove Bradshaw…has hung a slowly dripping glass funnel filled with water over a cone of Himalayan salt. An elegant visual balance and a concise metaphor for time, death, man versus nature, or just about anything else, it works as a kind of universal mantra.”
Robert Shuster
The Village Voice, New York, 2007

http://www.dovebradshaw.com/works/Salt%20Works.htm

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We ran into artist Dove Bradshaw at our interview with William Anastasi yesterday. Check out this clip where she contrasts Cage and Duchamp.