Because they are constituted by and through a culture that is itself fractured and contradictory, girls can also move about within that culture, they can contingently marshal one cultural strategy or practice against another. This means that girls do have the resources to think critically about mass culture. But those resources do not exist outside the already existing culture. They are themselves always already cultural.

This means that the political interventions we would design must address girls on their own ground. It simply will not do to lecture “just say no” when girls have already learned to inhabit a sexualized, tightly tank-topped body. Rather, we must engage girls in the conversations they have already started both within and among themselves. We must seek to understand what girls already know. And what they seem to know, better than the adults who would address them, is that change is constant, multiplicity can be generative, and contradiction, rather than a form of stasis to be feared, is something more like a matrix that is endlessly generative.

—  Janice Radway, “Girls, Zines, and the Miscellaneous Production of Subjectivity in an Age of Unceasing Circulation” (x)
My most recent essay deals with the ways that YouTube can be situated within a much larger history of participatory culture, and in particular, it tries to understand why some communities embrace the platform and why others have been more reluctant to do so. The point I want to raise is that a participatory culture is not necessarily a diverse culture, and we need to create mechanisms that embrace and promote diversity. YouTube offers such a vast array of materials that it is hard for many of us to see what is not there or to ask what mechanisms may block it from appearing.
—  Henry Jenkins, interview with Transformative Works and Cultures
Meeting with all my rapper friends
  • Me:First of all I wanna thank Fetty Wap for bringing this nice bottle of 1738 for us to share.
  • Fetty Wap:Hey What's Up Hello
  • Me:Anyways, I called this meeting because--
  • *Drake walks in, dragging Meek Mill with a leash.*
  • Me:Um...
  • Tupac:That's messed up man.
  • Me:Tupac? I thought you were dead!
  • Tupac:Death is an illusion. So is life. I transcend all realms of existence.
  • Me:I think I drank too much 1738--
  • Meek Mill:*Barks*
  • Me:Shit, did he really just--
  • Drake:I trained him well.
  • Me:Jeez...
  • Frank Ocean:Drake, I think you have some serious psychological issues you need to--
  • Me:SHUT THE FUCK UP FRANK YOU'RE NOT ALLOWED TO TALK UNTIL YOUR NEW ALBUM COMES OUT
  • Eminem:Did I mention I can rhyme words with orange?
  • Me:Yes Eminem, and we're all very proud of you, but there's something seriously wrong here we need to talk about.
  • Meek:*mouths "help me"*
  • Me:OK, will someone just call Nicki? This is out of control.
  • Childish Gambino:I like Asian women.
  • Everyone:We know, Donald.
  • Drake:Why are you guys being so hard on me? I mean, didn't Kendrick kill someone?
  • Kendrick:No, that symbolizes me blaming myself for the murder of my friend Dave, as well as the proverbial death of my childhood due to my experiences growing up in Compton.
  • Me:Wow I love you Kendrick. Thank you for making sense here while everyone--
  • Kendrick:THIS DICK AIN'T FREE
  • Me:Cmon man, I know that song symbolizes how you've been used by the rap industry but now's really not the time
  • Iggy:I'm so--
  • Me:GET THE FUCK OUT OF HERE YOU'RE AWFUL