Digital Age

This Generation: *helps the legalization LGBTQIA+ marriage, actually gives a shit about modern racism instead of brushing it under the rug, accepts each other regardless of gender identity, sexuality, religion, etc., promotes body positivity more than ever before, advocates for the rights of women, and is considered to be way more liberal than previous generations*

Last Generation: ugh, this generation is so shallow! Kids these days don’t care about anyone but themselves and their phones! They play on their devices all day without making any difference in the world! So lazy and selfish!

Permanence in the digital age

Why do library users demand digital material but still cherish offline material more? The artist Tamarin Norwood sought to depict this strange quirk of the digital age by turning off all her digital devices until she learnt to set type at the Bodleian Library. She managed to produce a series of print tweets, as shown in the image above!

Image: Print setting a tweet. Image courtesy of Chris Fletcher for Oxford University Press.

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The United Nations has declared Friday World Radio Day in celebration of radio’s unique status as a “simple and inexpensive” technology with the power to reach even the most remote, marginalized communities.

But we wondered — in this digital age, how hard is it to find a simple, inexpensive radio?

Our journey took us to several stores in Washington, D.C., in search of a portable and affordable radio, as well as to the National Capital Radio and Television Museum in Bowie, Md.

Finding A ‘Radio That Is Just A Radio’ In The Digital Age

Photo credit: Emily Jan/NPR

How the Digital Age Has Eroded Student Privacy

In 1965, when Mary Beth Tinker was 13 years old, she wore a black armband to her junior high school to protest the Vietnam War. The school promptly suspended her, but her protest eventually led to a landmark Supreme Court case: Tinker v. Des Moines. In their verdict, the court vindicated Tinker by saying students do not “shed their constitutional rights to freedom of speech or expression at the schoolhouse gate.” The 7-2 ruling ushered in a new era of free speech rights for students. First Amendment advocates basked in the glow of the Tinker decision for decades.

However, the Internet has since complicated the meaning of the ruling, and those same advocates now worry students’ rights to freedom of speech are again under attack. Schools regularly punish students for online comments, even if those comments are made away from school property and after school hours. Although some administrators target cyber-bullies, others punish students whose only offense is posting an online comment that the school doesn’t like.

The situation has inspired Tinker herself to tour the nation’s schools to revive student speech rights, nearly 50 years after her famous protest.

Read more. [Image: Adam Hunger/Reuters]