Deutschland

Update on Munich

- The shooter killed himself 

- After assuming there were up to three shooters yesterday, the police now assumes he was acting on his own 

- He was 18 years old 

- There are nine victims (Rest In Peace), not counting the shooter himself 

- sixteen people got injured 

- The motive is still unclear  

- There was probably no link to islamic extremism/the IS  

- Some people claim to heard him shout hateful phrases against foreigners or Neonazi/rightwing extremist phrases, that’s however not verified by any official sources (and there is a possibility the one shouting wasn’t the shooter but instead someone who saw him and assumed he was a foreigner) 

Meersburg in Baden-Württemberg, Southwestern Germany, lies on the Bodensee (Lake Constance). It’s known for its medieval old part of town. The lower part of town (Unterstadt) and upper town (Oberstadt) are reserved for pedestrians only and connected by 2 stairways and a steep street. The name means “Castle on the Sea”, referring to the castle which, according to a tradition from 1548, was built here in 630 by the Merovingian king Dagobert I. The commune obtained the status of free city in 1299. In 1803 it was annexed to the Land of Baden. After WW2, it was part of the French military zone.

They (BBC news and the German police) are saying now that the Munich shooter was inspired by mass shootings in the US as opposed to being inspired by ISIS/Islam. 

But I’m betting racist groups like PEGIDA and the NDP aren’t going to be attacking Americans (or at least, not the ones who happen to be white) in their alleged quest to “protect Germany/German culture”.

Factbox: Germany's stringent gun ownership rules

An 18-year-old “German-Iranian” believed to have acted alone killed 9 people (and injured 27) in a shooting spree with a pistol at a busy shopping center in Munich on Friday evening. Here are some facts about acquiring and owning a gun in Germany.

1. Germany has some of the “most stringent” rules around gun control in Europe, according to the U.S. Library of Congress (read this).

2. To own a gun in Germany, it is necessary to obtain a weapon license for which applicants must generally be at least 18 years old and show they have they have a reason for needing a weapon.

3. German authorities can prohibit anyone who is dependent on drugs or alcohol or is mentally ill from obtaining a gun license. People under 25 have to undergo a psychiatric test. 

4. After a teenager shot 15 people dead at a school in the southwestern town of Winnenden in 2009, Germany tightened the rules around firearms. Among other things, authorities were given greater authority to check whether guns were stored securely when not in use, and can make spot checks. 

5. Almost 5.5 million firearms are owned privately in Germany by around 1.4 million people, according to data from the German Firearms Register in 2013. Germany’s population is about 82 million.

6. There are up to 20 million illegal firearms in Germany, the daily Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung cited experts in Germany as saying in January. (By comparison, website GunPolicy.org says 270-310 million legal and illegal firearms are owned by civilians in the USA, where the population is ~324 mio)  

7. The German Federal Criminal Police Office said in its 2015 report that the use of firearms had been on a downward trend for years. In 2015 there were 4,289 cases of people being threatened with firearms - the lowest level since 1993. 

8. There were 57 gun homicides in Germany in 2015, up from 42 in 2014 - compared with 804 in 1995, according to website GunPolicy.org 

(Reuters.com by Michelle Martin & Erik Kirschbaum & Maria Sheahan)

Factbox: Germany's stringent gun ownership rules

An 18-year-old “German-Iranian” believed to have acted alone killed 9 people (and injured 27) in a shooting spree with a pistol at a busy shopping center in Munich on Friday evening. Here are some facts about acquiring and owning a gun in Germany.

1. Germany has some of the “most stringent” rules around gun control in Europe, according to the U.S. Library of Congress (read this).

2. To own a gun in Germany, it is necessary to obtain a weapon license for which applicants must generally be at least 18 years old and show they have they have a reason for needing a weapon.

3. German authorities can prohibit anyone who is dependent on drugs or alcohol or is mentally ill from obtaining a gun license. People under 25 have to undergo a psychiatric test. 

4. After a teenager shot 15 people dead at a school in the southwestern town of Winnenden in 2009, Germany tightened the rules around firearms. Among other things, authorities were given greater authority to check whether guns were stored securely when not in use, and can make spot checks. 

5. Almost 5.5 million firearms are owned privately in Germany by around 1.4 million people, according to data from the German Firearms Register in 2013. Germany’s population is about 82 million.

6. There are up to 20 million illegal firearms in Germany, the daily Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung cited experts in Germany as saying in January. (By comparison, website GunPolicy.org says 270-310 million legal and illegal firearms are owned by civilians in the USA, where the population is ~324 mio)  

7. The German Federal Criminal Police Office said in its 2015 report that the use of firearms had been on a downward trend for years. In 2015 there were 4,289 cases of people being threatened with firearms - the lowest level since 1993. 

8. There were 57 gun homicides in Germany in 2015, up from 42 in 2014 - compared with 804 in 1995, according to website GunPolicy.org 

(Reuters.com by Michelle Martin & Erik Kirschbaum & Maria Sheahan)

The german side of Tumblr is pissed and here’s why

Maybe you’ve noticed it, maybe you haven’t, but the german side of Tumblr is furious at the moment and it’s all the fault of today’s election. But before I begin to explain what happened, let me explain Germany’s political system first.

Germany is constituted of 16 states, the “Länder”, which all have their own parliament, which also means the states can decide a lot of stuff for themselves (this includes everything school related for example) without needing it to be accepted on a national level. Each Land votes for its parliament at least every 5 years. And today (13rd of March), was the Super-Wahl-Sonntag aka the day three different states elect their respective parliaments: Baden-Würtenberg,  Rheinland-Pfalz and Sachsen-Anhalt.

And that’s where the problem lies. The far right party AFD excelled. At the moment, the estimations lie at 24,3% in Sachsen-Anhalt (2nd place with 19 seats out of 102), 15,1% in Baden-Württemberg (3rd place with 23 seats out of 143) and 12,4% in Rheinland-Pfalz (3rd place with 13 seats out of 101). (as of 21h50) Now, what’s so bad about this?

Well, in short: The AFD is bad news. Their political plans include:

  • against the “educational exaltation of non-heterosexual people” (schools would only teach about heterosexual relationships)
  • stop the “hypersexualization of children” and by this they basically mean abolishing sex-education in schools
  • civil partnership (the only possibility in Germany for same-gender couples to get their relationship officially recognized) not to be put on a level with marriage
  • against renewable energies
  • cancel or at least, reduce subsidies 
  • suspend the Schengen-Contract (which allows free passage between EU countries) and close the border for the duration of the current wave of migrants
  • Migrants should get social benefits solely according to their country of origin or not at all (which means no financial support at all)

They’re also anti-Euro and anti-EU. 

Now, I understand if the actual program of the party doesn’t seem too scary. Well, let’s take a look at what they also stand for (which I’m simply not sure they’ve included in their official election program):

  • Enforced labour under minimum wage (8,50€/h at the moment) for long time unemployed people
  • thinks the effect of CO2 emission on the climate is propaganda and is in general against the reduction of CO2 emissions (and the greenhouse effect is a myth)
  • against data security which basically means government surveillance for everyone
  • wants to reintroduce the compulsory military service for men
  • against the legalisation fo abortion
  • they’re against “gender mainstreaming” aka they hate trans people and everything that devies from the norm
  • Refugees should be shot at the border if necessary

In general, they’re a far right winged, homophobic, transphobic, old fashioned party which is against everything any kind of progress stands for. Germany has been shifting to the right more and more in the past years and this is the proof of how it can affect us. We’re pissed that people don’t use the chance they’re given through these elections, we’re pissed at the succes of a far right party and we’re pissed at the general stupidity that seems to dominate our country.

Munich Update

•Puplic transportation is down

•One confirmed, possibly more, active shooters on the run, police confirms
they “have no idea where the shooter is”

•Police advices ALL OF MUNICH to STAY INSIDE/SEEK SHELTER

•AVOID THE MUSIC FESTIVAL THAT IS HAPPENING RIGHT NOW IN MUNICH

4

Looming over the small Bavarian town of Hohenschwangau are the turrets and towers of one of the world’s most famous “fairytale” castles. Schloß Neuschwanstein, or “New Swan Stone Castle”, was the fantastical creation of King Ludwig II – a monarch who dreamed of creating for himself an ideal medieval palace, nestled in the Alps. Though designed to represent a 13th-century Romanesque castle, Neuschwanstein was a thoroughly 19th-century project, constructed using industrial methods and filled with modern comforts and conveniences; indeed, without the technological advancements of the time, Ludwig could never have escaped into his medieval fantasy.

See captions for credits

In German we don’t say “Everything must come to an end” we say “Alles hat ein Ende nur die Wurst hat zwei” which roughly translates to “Everything has an end except the sausage which owns two (ends)” and I like food.