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Petition to rename ADHD: Rather than calling it “Attention Deficit / Hyperactivity Disorder,” how about Attention Overabundance…

Much more accurate. The problem we have with attention isn’t a deficiency, it’s sometimes being deluged with too many things simultaneously demanding our attention to focus on a single one - especially those that feel in some way less interesting, important, or urgent.

Also maybe reconsider “Hyperactivity Disorder.” Just because someone needs physical stim to calm down doesn’t necessarily make them hyperactive. Plus, hyper-focus can provide hours of extreme productivity when harnessed.

Definitions are a matter of perspective. It seems that those whose brains work this way can come up with less-ableist language than those who are inconvenienced by us. ]

chatoyant

[shuh-toi-uh nt] 

(adj.) 1. changing in luster or color; iridescent. 2. in jewels, reflecting a single streak of light, similar in appearance to a cat’s eye.

The boa constrictor lifted its heart-shaped head over the foliage, and one small chatoyant eye, smooth and shiny as a bead of mercury, glinted in the light.

h-hello ….. ~22/100 😄

ohmahhhhgawd school day today was so frekin long and tiring but kinda fun ✊🏼 bc art history & frands

today I just did homework - revised over my subjects including making these flashcards during bio (bc flashcards should be made at the beginning..not 2days before an exam like I did for the last 4years) …hardest subject right now is probably chem …even though physics is creepin up there (even though we’re just doing last years stuff 😂😂)
Yahhhhhh
hab a GREAT day 😉

A COLLECTION OF VARIOUS TUMBLR USERS’ FAVOURITE WORDS

absolution; act of absolving; a freeing from blame or guilt; release fromconsequences, obligations, or penalties.

acquiesce; accept something reluctantly but without protest.

asterismos; a rhetorical term for an introductory word or phrase that has the primary function of calling attention to what follows.

astronomy; the scientific study of matter and phenomena in the universe, especially in outer space, including the positions, dimensions, distribution, motion, composition, energy, and evolution of celestial objects.

ataraxia; a state of freedom from emotional disturbance and anxiety; tranquillity.

aura; a distinctive and pervasive quality or character; atmosphere.

boisterous; noisy, energetic, and cheerful.

bling; a slang term popularized in hip hop culture, referring to flashy, ostentatious, or elaborate jewellery and ornamented accessories

brontide; a low muffled sound like distant thunder heard in certain seismic regions especially along seacoasts and over lakes and thought to be caused by feeble earth tremors.

burgundy; a deep red colour like that of burgundy wine.

cacophony; a harsh discordant mixture of sounds.

camaraderie; mutual trust and friendship among people who spend a lot of time together.

capricious; guided by whim rather than reason.

cosmic; relating to the universe or cosmos, especially as distinct from the earth.

decadence; moral or cultural decline as characterized by excessive indulgence in pleasure or luxury.

defenestration; the action of throwing someone out of a window, or, the action or process of dismissing someone from a position of power or authority.

effervescent; vivacious and enthusiastic.

eloquence; fluent or persuasive speaking or writing.

ephemeral; lasting for a very short time.

epinephrine; another term for adrenaline.

epistemology; the theory of knowledge, especially with regard to its methods, validity, and scope, and the distinction between justified belief and opinion.

ethereal; extremely delicate and light in a way that seems not to be of this world.

eunoia; comes from the Greek word εὔνοια, meaning “well mind” or “beautiful thinking.”

fantastical; based on or existing only in fantasy; unreal.

furtive; attempting to avoid notice or attention, typically because of guilt or a belief that discovery would lead to trouble; secretive.

gossamer; a light, thin, and insubstantial or delicate material or substance.

halcyon; denoting a period of time in the past that was idyllically happy and peaceful.

ineffable; too great or extreme to be expressed or described in words.

intoxication; the state of being intoxicated, especially by alcohol.

lactescere; (Latin) to turn to milk.

leonine; of or resembling a lion or lions.

loquacious; tending to talk a great deal; talkative.

machiavellian; cunning, scheming, and unscrupulous, especially in politics.

mischievous; causing or showing a fondness for causing trouble in a playful way.

momentum; the impetus gained by a moving object.

myriad; a countless or extremely great number of people or things.

nebulae; a cloud of gas and dust in outer space, visible in the night sky either as an indistinct bright patch or as a dark silhouette against other luminous matter.

nefarious; (typically of an action or activity) wicked or criminal.

nonchalant; feeling or appearing casually calm and relaxed; not displaying anxiety, interest, or enthusiasm.

opalescence; the quality of being opallike, or milkily iridescent. 

obligatory; required by a legal, moral, or other rule; compulsory.

orphic; of or relating to Orpheus or Orphism.

parenthetical; relating to or inserted as a parenthesis (explains or qualifies something).

partial; existing only in part; incomplete.

pastiche; an artistic work in a style that imitates that of another work, artist, or period.

petrichor; a pleasant smell that frequently accompanies the first rain after a long period of warm, dry weather.

phosphenes; a sensation of a ring or spot of light produced by pressure on the eyeball or direct stimulation of the visual system other than by light.

plethora; a large or excessive amount of something.

pleasure; a feeling of happy satisfaction and enjoyment.

pretentious; attempting to impress by affecting greater importance or merit than is actually possessed.

prosaic; having or using the style or diction of prose as opposed to poetry; lacking imaginativeness or originality, commonplace; unromantic.

resilience; the capacity to recover quickly from difficulties; toughness.

ricochet; a bullet or other projectile rebound off a surface.

sempiternal; eternal and unchanging; everlasting.

serendipitous; occurring or discovered by chance in a happy or beneficial way.

sphere; a round solid figure, or its surface, with every point on its surface equidistant from its centre.

soliloquy; an act of speaking one’s thoughts aloud when by oneself or regardless of any hearers, especially by a character in a play.

sonorous; (of a person’s voice or other sound) imposingly deep and full.

tenebrific; causing gloom or darkness.

twilight; the soft glowing light from the sky when the sun is below the horizon, caused by the reflection of the sun’s rays from the atmosphere.

vespertide; the period of vespers; evening.

vicissitude; a change of circumstances or fortune, typically one that is unwelcome or unpleasant.

waltz; a ballroom dance in triple time performed by a couple or to act casually, confidently, or inconsiderately.

akiraofthefour  asked:

Does the phenomenon that makes people "read" animal emotions as people emotions (like a dog making a tense or scared expression being misinterpreted as equaling a human smile) have a specific name? Or is it just a side effect of the fact that humans in general are empathetic creatures that naturally empathize in a human way (or something like that)? Thank you very much for your help!

It’s called anthropomorphism. The tendency for humans to want to empathize with non-human animals is called biophilia, and it becomes anthropomorphic when people attribute human characteristics to non-humans.