Deep-Space-Probes

sister-forget-me-not  asked:

You've been watching us for 2000 years, do you think there is hope for mankind?

I asked myself the same thing during the Hundred Years War, the Plague, the Spanish Inquisition, the Thirty Years War, African Slavery, capitalist westward expansion and colonialism, the destruction of the native peoples of North America, the First World War, the Second World War’s internment camps and Holocaust, the Cold War, Vietnam…I think you take my point…And you’re quite surprisingly, still here.

Do I have hope for you? Yes.

Why? Because no matter how many times you’ve repeated your mistakes, there’s always progress. And progress comes at a quicker and quicker pace. In the last two decades I’ve seen more technological and sociological change than in the first three centuries I can recall strung together. I have hope for a global culture, and the digital natives who came up when it was nascent.

You are mocked by the older generations, who have extended their lifespans and thusly your adolescence. You are denigrated for literally everything you do until it seems the elders are arguing at cross purposes. You’re either too lazy or have too much education, too self-involved or too often the advocates of social justice. You’re either the first generation of adults to come out of the internet and therefore unique, or you’re obnoxious snowflakes. So it is, my dear friends, that I feel a certain kinship with you. As I’ve said before I am often cajoled for being too much of one thing or not enough of it.

I’m tired of this notion that a creature as long-lived as I “wouldn’t care”. Of course we would. We live here too and what the hell else have we got to do? You think age dulls feelings? It does not. That springs from a human failing, in that the older your species gets, the brain breaks down. By the time you’re in your sixties, you have become more fearful and thusly more conservative, more jaded and thusly less inclined to trust. You think an old creature will give up, become stoic, disgusted with all of you and ambivalent toward your existence.

That is inaccurate.

You are feeling the growing pangs of a turbulent upbringing. All infants grow out of selfish fixations into the fullness of awareness that in order to exist, one must rely and be relied upon by others.

And you millennials are the new adults. You are the new arbiters of fate for your species: the most aggregated higher education of any previous generation, possessing an alacrity with technological thinking, fully aware and embracing of scientific exploration (having been brought up with knowledge of biology and cosmology. Do not forget that less than 150 years ago, it was illegal to dissect corpses and men were treated for injuries with a hacksaw and some rye. Less than 60 years ago men hadn’t been to the moon, or laughed a deep space probe.), graced with the inborn knowledge of global culture, more willing to be compassionate than any previous era of man.

So does this old thing have hope? No. Hope is a terrible word for what I have. “Certainty” is a better one.

Just don’t let up on all this Climate Change business. The planet has far less time than any of your elders is willing to contemplate, because they are closer to death and so run from it at top speed. Use that passionate youthful persistence to champion a cause that effects every life on this rock.

And never become jaded. Age shouldn’t teach fear. It should teach a person how to overcome it.

After an international poll overwhelmingly votes it in as humanities greatest artistic achievement, NASA reluctantly launches it’s new deep space probe with a single data file stored: the entire Bee Movie script.

Review: Monsters (movie)

Genre: sci-fi, post-apocalyptic, thriller

Year: 2010

Directed by: Gareth Edwards

Cast: Scoot McNairy, Whitney Able

A deep-space probe is sent to recover what could be traces of alien life. During its return, it crash lands in northern Mexico, and the life forms it contained spread out. They now thrive in an “infected Zone” at the border between Mexico and USA. Walls and bombings seem uncapable of containing these polyp/squid shaped creatures.

After months, possibly years, the situation is no better. Andrew Kaulder is a   photojournalist currently operating in Mexico, and is asked to find his boss’ daughter, Samantha Wynden, injured in what appears to be a creature attack. He has to take her back home before air and sea travel gets blocked for months in an attempt to control the situation. Things don’t go as planned, and the two have to walk through the Infected Zone to get home. During their adventure they learn more about the Zone (why is it considered “infected”) and about the creatures.

Monsters plays with the trope of the Zone in a not fully original but still interesting way, dealing with important themes as it shows us how life goes on at the border - not exactly the most safe border, since creatures get in and out as they please, apparently. Some people try to get away, but it’s super expensive. Some others have resigned to live there. Despite the horrors, life goes on. And the rest of the world doesn’t seem to care (not even the rest of the USA, is implied). The movie is relatively low-budget, but that is not the worst problem. It shows, but it doesn’t really matter. What matters is that the two actors aren’t super good, and the personal problems of their characters could have been handled better. Also, what starts the adventure properly (why they specifically have to walk through the zone) is a bit lame, compared to the other elements. The setting and the world that surrounds them are more interesting than the characters. More specifically, the creatures: they’re more like alien animals than monsters, after all, and it’s clear that some great care was put behind their simple but effective design. Oh, and watch out for the ending. The real one, I mean.

Overall it’s not a masterpiece, but if you’re into the trope of the Zone, it’s recommended. You will not regret it, because it has some interesting elements and details that you’ll still enjoy.

Vote: 7

celestriakle  asked:

Have you ever talked or thought much about the Red Eye in episode 2? I rewatched that ep today and I had COMPLETELY forgotten about it. The gems clearly recognize it and know what it is, but given Homeworld wasnt taking much notice of Earth especially at that point, I'm just really confused. What is it? Why's it there? Who sent it? What does it do? Just some questions I have; I love your theories and would love to hear your thoughts :3

The Red Eye is actually mentioned by Peridot in Marble Madness! It’s not much commented on so it’s pretty easy to sneak past the radar, but she says “-But the Red Eye didn’t report any Gems on this planet!”

What was later confirmed by Crewniverse is that the Red Eye is a deep space probe that was sent to look for Gems on Earth before Homeworld risked actually putting someone on the planet. (which is interesting because it suggests Homeworld is pretty scared of the Crystal Gems- perhaps as much as the CG is of them). Because it didn’t come back, and it apparently takes more time for it to take a snapshot and send it back than it did for the Crystal Gems to destroy it, it apparently took them until Warp Tour for its earliest observation to come back negative (or for them to presume) and have Peridot start sending her robonoids to fix the warp. 

So yeah, the Red Eye was a machine sent by Peridot, which I find interesting because that suggests each of the first three episodes was foreshadowing a member of the “Homeworld trio”- first episode features Centipeetle, who appears to be a type of quartz, similar to Jasper, second episode has the Red Eye, which was sent by Peridot, and the third episode features the Lunar Sea Spire which, if I’m right in my theories, is heavily associated with Lapis and her history.