Curator's code

Introducing The Curator’s Code: A Standard for Honoring Attribution of Discovery Across the Web

The great Maria Popova, who curates Brain Pickings, has devised a much-needed best practice for attribution on sites that curate content from around the web (like this one).

The Curator’s Code seeks to balance the magic of the rabbit-hole of web discovery with fair and honest attribution to the sources and creators.

While we have systems in place for literary citation, image attribution, and scientific reference, we don’t yet have a system that codifies the attribution of discovery in curation as a currency of the information economy, a system that treats discovery as the creative labor that it is. 

This is what The Curator’s Code is – a system for honoring the creative and intellectual labor of information discovery by making attribution consistent and codified, the celebrated norm. 

It’s an effort to make the rabbit hole open, fair, and ever-alluring.


It consists of two unicode characters, one () to replace “via”, and the other () to replace “HT” or “hat-tip”. Are you just re-linking and not adding much context? Use the first. Using material as inspiration for something more? Use the second. 

There’s even a bookmarklet to make it super-easy across many platforms, and a how-to video. It’s a few seconds of work that can alter the culture of attribution and sharing on the social web.

I’m on board. It’s this easy …

Curator’s Code

I’ve been running a hybrid articles-and-links blog here (↬DF) for a while, I wrote the function that added “via” links to billions of reblogged posts on Tumblr, and I didn’t even know the difference between “via” and “hat tip” until today.
—  Instapaper founder (and Tumblr co-founder) Marco Arment • Offering his take, in a post titled “Not a Curator,” on the “Curator’s Code” idea that’s been floating around for the past day or two. His feeling? We’re fighting over something that’s not a big deal, and the solution is going to be ignored by the organizations that it’s meant to target. “The proper place for ethics and codes is in ensuring that a reasonable number of people go to the source instead of just reading your rehash,” he argues. Personally, that’s always been our goal — but that said, unlike Marco, we’d call ourselves curators.
curatorscode.org
Arts Tech Meetup Speaker 10. Maria Popova and the Curator's Code

#ArtsTech Meetup Demo Day - July 16th

10. Maria Popova - Curator’s Code

What is the Curator’s Code?

“A suggested system for honoring the creative and intellectual labor of information discovery by making attribution consistent and codified, celebrating authors and creators, and also respecting those who discover and amplify their work." 

Maria Popova’s Blog Brain Pickings  

Richard Dunlop-Walters on Curation

Richard Dunlop-Walters (who edits, or rather “curates,” Instapaper’s featured content section) on web curation.

Like many things on the internet, this thing is largely about ego. I believe that Popova is genuine in her concern for proper attribution into the rabbit hole of web wonderland. I also believe that she runs a glorified link blog and would like some credit for that.

(Previously.)



Cross posted from http://bit.ly/NraMKZ
danwajda.com
The Curator's Code

While we have systems in place for literary citation, image attribution, and scientific reference, we don’t yet have a system that codifies the attribution of discovery in curation as a currency of the information economy, a system that treats discovery as the creative labor that it is.

This is what The Curator’s Code is – a system for honoring the creative and intellectual labor of information discovery by making attribution consistent and codified, the celebrated norm.

This is great.

Bycicle Mind

curatorscode.org
curator's ǝpoɔ

Hm. Color me intrigued. As Maria Popova explains over at Brain Pickings:

One of the most magical things about the Internet is that it’s a whimsical rabbit hole of discovery — we start somewhere familiar and click our way to a wonderland of curiosity and fascination we never knew existed. What makes this contagion of semi-serendipity possible is an intricate ecosystem of “link love” — a via-chain of attribution that allows us to discover new wonderlands through those we already know and trust.

The Curator’s Code is an effort to keep this whimsical rabbit hole open by honoring discovery through an actionable code of ethics — first, understanding why attribution matters, and then, implementing it across the web in a codified common standard, doing for attribution of discovery what Creative Commons has done for image attribution.

So I think I’m about to do this right?

[ @Glark]

You Are Not a Curator

Choire Sicha does not care for your use of the word “curator.” And, lest we forget, neither do I. [via]

Your faux TED talk is not going well for you if you are making some point about “curation” replacing “creation” because, well, for starters, “curation” is choosing among things that are created? So like there’s nothing for you to curate without creation? This precious bit of dressing-up what people choose to share on the Internet is, sure, silly, but it’s also a way for bloggers to distance themselves from the dirty blogging masses. You are no different from some teen in Indiana with a LiveJournal about cutting. Sorry folks!



Cross posted from http://bit.ly/KoMC3R