Culture-of-Japan

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Dragon and Geisha

Unique Traditional artwork made with:

  • - Black ink/White and golden ink
  • - Copic/Prismacolor/Touch markers
  • - Made on Canson Bristol 14x17" cardboard paper

On sale at 70$CAN and shippable anywhere, if you are interested : please contact me by email via cinensis.artwork@gmail.com and it will be a pleasure to answer any questions you may have about it or complete the purchase.

Thank you very much and please help by reblogging!

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92-Year-Old Grandmother Makes Stunningly Intricate Temari Balls

A ninety-two-year-old-grandmother from Japan creates stunning embroidered balls known as “temari,” (meaning “hand ball” in Japanese) which showcase a skill she learned in her sixties. A traditional folk art, which was conceived in Japan in the 7th century, the craft is tedious and highly demanding craft. The unknown woman has constructed 500 unique designs, which are photographed by her granddaughter NanaAkua. Overall these beautiful trinkets are a symbol of happy life and good fortune, which originate from friendship and loyalty. 

This is Shigeru Mizuki

He was born March 8 1922 and passed away November 30 2015 at age 93.

Mizuki-san was a manga-ka and historian, most famous for his Kitaro manga, Which he started publishing in 1960.

I could give a textbook account of him and everything he’s done and his influence on Japanese culture and revival of the interest in Yokai in Japan as a whole, but I just want to point out some very small things about him;

The first is, unlike a lot of Manga-ka of the 60s, Mizuki did not learn to draw Manga from Tezuka’s school…. or any school at all. He was one of those weird ‘natural talents’ you always hear about but actual examples of are hard to find. Mizuki was one such person. He just inately knew how to draw. And as a result, despite influences from other manga at the time, his characters generally don’t resemble what we think of when we think of ‘60s manga’

Not to mention that, despite his preferred art style, he was diverse in what he could do with how he drew, easily going from his more cartoony drawings to a more realistic style, sometimes doing both at once.

Mizuki-san was drafted into the Japanese Imperial Army during WWII, and during the war contracted malaria and lost his left arm during an explosion.

He was left-handed.

However, despite disease, losing his drawing-hand, being the only surviving member of his unit and literally being ‘ordered to die’ by his superiors, Mizuki survived the war and taught himself to draw with his right hand and just kept going.

His manga that he’s famous for were all done after he lost his dominant arm.

All his manga have a personal autobiographical touch to them. Whether it’s “Showa” which is literally a historical account of what Japan was like from the 20s to the 80s, to Kitaro, which is about the stories of Yokai told to him by his elderly neighbour, all his manga have something personal about them.

He is a cultural icon in Japan for keeping traditional ghost stories and creatures alive in the modern consciousness, as well as his contributions to Japanese history regarding WWII. He traveled the world, gathering ghost stories and traditional folklore from other countries as well.

He’s been awarded a string of awards I’m not even gonna attempt to list, although personally I feel most noteworthy is the ‘Personal of Cultural Merit’ award in 2010 and the ‘Order of the Rising Sun’ Award.

But again, that is his importance historically and culturally, whereas I find his personal struggles regarding the loss of his arm and just relearning how to draw something more personal to know as an artist.

With this in mind, He is also noteworthy for never really following the idea that most manga-ka of the time had that ‘you only need 3 hours sleep a night’ or to keep working without rest. Mizuki never really followed that belief. He got a full night’s sleep every night, and fully believed in actually LIVING life, and not just spending your entire life behind a desk, drawing.

He later joked offhandedly that at age 90 he was still around whereas everyone else of the same time period making manga had long since died.

I feel this is incredibly important to remember. Tezuka believed in working non-stop and barely sleeping. And he is undoubtedly the most important contributor to what we think of as manga today. But Mizuki-san, who is just as important to Japanese culture, believed in sleeping well, living life, and being happy. And he was ALSO important, created amazing work, and is recognized as a master.

You don’t need to work yourself to death to be an artist.

Mizuki-san had a list of ‘7 rules to happiness’, which I honestly feel is worth remembering. It may be things we’ve heard before, but this coming from a man, who went through active war, lost limbs, nearly died,retaught himself how to draw because he wasn’t able to give up, made an impact on Japanese culture, believed in living life, refused to overwork himself and lived to the age of 93, it feels like you can trust his advice. because he’s someone who’s seen some serious shit, but he was happy, and he’d learned how to be happy. And from what I’ve heard remained happy and content until he died of natural causes.

Number 1

‘Don’t try to win – Success is not the measure of life. Just do what you enjoy. Be happy.’

Number 2

‘Follow your curiosity – Do what you feel drawn towards, almost like a compulsion. What you would do without money or reward.’

Number 3

‘Pursue what you enjoy – Don’t worry if other people find you foolish. Look at all the people in the world who are eccentric—they are so happy! Follow your own path.’

Number 4

‘Believe in the power of love – Doing what you love, being with people you love. Nothing is more important.’

Number 5

‘Talent and income are unrelated – Money is not the reward of talent and hard work. Self-satisfaction is the goal. Your efforts are worthy if you do what you love.’

Number 6

‘Take it easy – Of course you need to work, but don’t overdo it! Without rest, you’ll burn yourself out.’

Number 7

‘Believe in what you cannot see – The things that mean the most are things you cannot hold in your hand.’

20 Photographs of The Many Faces of Tokyo’s Stray Cats

Japanese photographer Masayuki Oki captures our favorite feline friends who live anonymously in the bustling city of Tokyo’s shitamachi area. His collection of cats images, called “busayan,” which translates to “ugly cat” portrays the adorable kitties goofing around, napping and even fighting. Okie documents their skills of survival, as well as the daily life of the homeless cat. He confesses: “I want to travel the country photographing all of Japan’s lovely stray cats.”

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[TRANS] Kai will be starring in a Japanese drama called "Spring Has Arrived"

⇢ “Spring Has Arrived” information

The drama is a remake from an original short story by Kuniko Mukuda, the best Japanese screenwriter. As the writer of this story, Kuniko Mukoda’s works have affected people beyond times and border. They want this lead role to be able to - deliver that emotions, impress watchers beyond words and feel cultural differences. “Spring Has Arrived” is a ‘family’ drama in which the existence of a man changes a family. The role played by Kai is a special role in which his existence in the family is like a spring that will changed the family like a surrounding typhoon. 

The producer of ‘Spring Has Arrived’ says he wanted the character to move people’s hearts without any regards to language and cultural differences, that’s why he offered Kai this role since the producer could not think of anyone else because of Kai’s sensibility, sincere attitude and charisma.

⇢ "Spring Has Arrived” original story line

Naoko is a 31 year old single sales clerk who works in a departmental store in the underclothes section. She is nothing special and constantly lies about her family to people around her. In reality, she lives with parents who works part-time and a sister who is a hikkomori (person who avoids social contact). 

One day, she meets a Korean photographer named Lee Ji Won (Kai) and goes on a date with him. However, he ends up having to take her home because her leg got stuck in the taxi door after their date. Because he ends up taking her home, he meets her family. Naoko thought Ji Won would walk away when he found out how she lied about her family, but instead, he becomes close to her family and even goes on a family trip together later on. From that day on, Naoko and her family drastically changes (in a good way of course).

Later on, Naoko’s mother talks about a possible marriage between the two, but unfortunately, they decide that they were not meant for each other and mutually broke up and go their separate ways. They later meet each other on the streets by accident and happily greet each other. 

⇢ Q&A with Kai

Q: please let us know how you feel about you first Japanese drama experience.

KAI: I was excited and happy to shoot my first Japanese drama. (Unclear sentence) I would like to do my best and deliver good work to all my fans. And I think I can make lots of new friends with Japanese actors and staff.

Q: What are you looking forward to most while shooting in Japan?

KAI: it is my first time shooting in Japan so it will be different than shooting in Korea. It will be my first time staying in Japan so I look forward to experiencing different cultures and food in Japan and making nice memories with everyone in Japan.

Q: Please give a message for your Japanese fans.

KAI: hello it’s EXO’s Kai. I mainly saw you in concerts in Japan, but this time I can meet you through a drama. It’s special to me (?) though I still lack I will work hard and enjoy my shooting in Japan and deliver good work to everyone. Everyone, please look forward to “Spring has Arrived” thank you very much.

translation credit: kimkwon889496, kaaiikim, kimjoninis