Crinoline

5

JELLYFISH PILLOW

Quote from Welcome To Night Vale Episode 22: “The Whispering Forest”
Pattern based on this piece by Jedishywalker

OH MY GOD I FINISHED IT. MONTHS OF MY LIFE. Look at the jellyfish GAZE UPON THEIR WEIRDNESS AND BEAUTY. GAZE UPON THE COLORS. GAZE AND MOAN INTO THE ENDLESS VOID.

This is one of my very, very favorite quotes from Night Vale. It is now on my couch. This is how you nerd-adult.


Thank yous!
@crinoline-gremlin for talking me off the ledge during the pillowcase portion! <3

@jedishywalker for the pattern base!

My lovely co-worker for lending me all the jellyfish colors!

flickr

Windy hill por Magdalena Russocka

yesimweirdgetusedtoit  asked:

"let me tell you what I know about the feminist history of petticoats and crinolines some time" - Please do! All I've ever seen in media is the "girl-ditches-hindering-petticoats-for-pants" or other variations

Ok! I only just learned about this through my historical dress class, which is why you haven’t heard me shouting about it before, but apparently—ok. Wait. Back up. You know the 1830s/1840s/1850s, right? That was The Time When People Dressed in a Very Silly Manner.

I mean, it’s kinda pretty? if you ignore the weird proportions and hats and bows? but it’s also just so FLOOFY. And that floofy look was achieved by layering many, many petticoats on top of each other, which made getting through doors hard and made life very heavy and hard-to-move-in, carting around so many pounds of so many different skirts every day.

^1830s ladies, all day every day.

But then, thanks to the whaling industry, some clever soul realized that you could achieve the same floofy shape, without the floofs, by approximating it in steel or whalebone or canvas. resulting in this sexy, minimalistic, easy shape:

As you can see, the wire bits hang naturally from the waist, and allow for a lot of legroom beneath the dress. And because the wires are in nice clean circles that can crunch up into each other like an accordion, it’s easy to sit down, kneel, readust, or rebend your skirts to fit the occasion. And because you can control the shape of the structure, you can control the shape of the skirt placed on top of it, allowing for the design of more streamlined skirt shapes that, while still very full and floofy, can push the floofs to the back and allow one to get through doorways.

This was a revelation to the ladies of the 1850s. Look at that top image again, and imagine, like, 5-10 huge cotton or linen or wool petticoats straining to hold it up, all the weight of which is hanging from your waist and catching up against your legs all the time. Ever held a pile of cotton? It’s heavy. Wool is worse. But then you get this circular frame on instead, and you’re only holding up ONE or TWO sheets of fabric—like, your actual skirt and then just one extra petticoat for decency—and the frame lets you SPIN and SIT and SQUEEZE AROUND THINGS and oh my god!! you can move!!!!!! The ladies could get out and do things. And you know what happens when women are able to get out of their houses—they go demanding the right to own property, and the right to vote, and the right to do cool things while wearing their crinolines.

So, the crinoline (and then, later, the hoop skirt): while today maybe we don’t want them, yesterday they were the latest thing to help women get up and out from under the patriarchy, by giving them an option that preserved their femininity but let them move in freer ways. Crinolines were a stepping stone. And when it comes down to it, that’s what feminism is, in all its imperfect striding towards perfection—one stepping stone after another, with the triumph of one year seeming like the peak of sexism the next. We shouldn’t always beat up the past for trying its best—cuz how will our descendants view our push-up bras and 6-inch heels, when all is said and done?