Criminal Justice

When Ameneh Bahrami rejected a man’s marriage proposal, he turned bitter and threw acid into her face leaving her with extreme disfigurements. She went through 19 agonising operations and is permanently blind, but this didn’t stop her wanting justice on the man who ruined her life. In court, the judge wanted the accused to serve a lengthy prison sentence and pay full compensation to Ameneh, but she had different ideas: She asked if she could have exact revenge, by injecting acid into the man’s eyes. The court allowed it as a capital punishment, and arrangements were made for Ameneh to inject 20 drops of acid into her attacker’s eyes to blind him.

However, in a last-minute act of peace and bravery, Ameneh decided to pardon her attacker. Strapped to a bed, he kicked and spat at her while he awaited the injection, but she could not ruin someone else’s life, no matter what he’d done to her. She told everyone: “I couldn’t do it, I knew I could not live with it until the end of my life. I knew I would have suffered and burned twice had I done that.”

College Majors as lines from Hamilton
  • Psychology: Some men say that I'm intense or I'm insane
  • Chemistry: SHA-BOOM
  • Accounting: We need to handle our financial situation
  • History: But Jesus between all the bleeding and fighting I've been reading and writing
  • Business: Shake hands with him, charm her
  • English: He started retreatin and readin every treatise on the shelf
  • Creative writing: You built me palaces out of paragraphs
  • Criminal justice: Stay out of trouble and you double your choices
  • Pre Med/Nursing: Stay alive
  • Education: Give us a verse, drop some knowledge
  • Theater: Yo yo yo what time is it? SHOW TIME!
  • Music: You changed the melody every time
  • Foreign language: I came from afar just to say "bonsoir!"
  • Political Science: Don't modulate the key then not debate with me
  • Current Affairs: How lucky we are to be alive right now, history is happening
  • Fashion: I think your pants look hot
  • Philosophy: You want a revolution, I want a revelation
  • Theology: I'm searching and scanning for answers in every line

“Terrorism is different. People expect us to prevent it. And we can’t afford to lose. We can’t get anything wrong.” 

Meet Zainab Ahmad, the Assistant U.S. Attorney who has probably logged more hours talking to legitimate Al Qaeda members and hardened terrorist killers than any other prosecutor in America.

Since 2009, she has prosecuted thirteen international terrorist suspects for the American government. And she hasn’t lost a single case yet.

shit my criminal justice professor has pulled
  • On the second week of class wore a baseball cap and sunglasses and attempted to go undercover within the students before class started just to “catch wind” of the latest gossip
  • wore a maternity dress over his regular clothes and then another layer of regular clothes on top of that just to make a joke in the middle of class by stripping down to the maternity dress
  • This thing called “Mowen dollars” which is just a piece of paper with his face on it that counts as extra credit if you turn it in with a test or paper
  • Called us his “little ducklings” on multiple occasions
  • Told us to flip off the class in the hall as we were leaving because they interrupted the middle of his lecture
  • Also has this thing called “infinite generosity” where if you ask him to do something he won’t say no
  • For example, we can now use notes on every exam
  • Constantly photoshops his face onto pictures on his powerpoints
  • Got a speeding ticket and went to court to argue it with science about inclines and how it artificially adds speed to a car when they’re going down. 
  • Lost the case and had to pay the ticket anyways. 
  •  Used his infinite generosity to grant us the option of actually turning in our final term paper without repercussions
  •  Bargained with us that if 84% of the class responded to the teacher survey sent out by the university we could basically take the final test as a class
  • Has had the highest rate of teacher survey response in the department for 4 years running and considers it a personal victory
  • Took multiple pictures of the armored trucks that our local police department has purchased from his home while only wearing underwear
  • In his infinite generosity, he made the final term paper optional because some kid asked him to like a week before it was supposed to be due
buzzfeed.com
Above The Law: How Canadian Police Are Rarely Held To Account When Accused Of Misconduct
Canadian police are rarely held to account when accused of breaking the law.
By Bruce Livesey

[…]

Like the United States, Canada has a poor track record of prosecuting police who break the law, despite the emergence in some provinces of agencies specifically designed to investigate police.

BuzzFeed News examined court records, data from police investigatory bodies, and media accounts, and spoke with experts, former police officers, victims, lawyers, and advocates and found that Canadian police who kill, wound, assault, allegedly plant evidence, or are found to have lied in court are rarely held to account. We found many examples of officers who were reprimanded by judges for fabricating testimony, or whose unethical conduct caused charges to be dismissed, and who went on to commit similar acts — and even be promoted.

“It’s like Groundhog Day,” said André Marin, a former Ontario Ombudsman and former head of the Special Investigations Unit (SIU), an agency that investigates police in Ontario when they cause injury. “When there is a [police] shooting, everybody freaks out, ‘Oh my god, oh my god, oh my god,’ and nothing seems to happen.”

Alan Young, a criminal law professor at Osgoode Hall Law School, agrees. “Basically when it comes to accountability for misconduct, police get a free pass,” he said. “It’s always been that way and it will probably continue that way until somebody wants to champion the issue of police accountability.”

One significant challenge in evaluating the accountability of police in Canada is that no nationwide data exists that accurately tracks how many police officers are accused or investigated for misconduct, what happens when they are investigated, how often they are prosecuted or cleared, and which offenses they are most often accused of committing. But the few statistics that do exist on police accountability paint a bleak picture.

Continue Reading.

This is the criminal justice system under #capitalism: Defraud investors and the punishment is 20 years in prison. But, where’s the justice when life saving drugs is being exploited for profit?

Capitalism only leads to greed and reckless behavior where no one is held accountable. Just like Martin Shkreli who’s now the poster boy with what’s wrong with capitalism.

In 2010, a sixteen-year-old boy was accused of stealing a backpack. He spent three years in Rikers Island, enduring abuse and solitary confinement, yet he was never convicted of a crime and charges were ultimately dropped. 

How did this happen?

Find out when Spike presents “TIME: The Kalief Browder Story,” a six-part documentary event beginning tonight at 10/9c.

Help spread the word on social media using the hashtag #KaliefBrowder and these assets: http://spike.tumblr.com/kalief